ASCL.net

Astrophysics Source Code Library

Making codes discoverable since 1999

Welcome to the ASCL

The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) is a free online registry for source codes of interest to astronomers and astrophysicists and lists codes that have been used in research that has appeared in, or been submitted to, peer-reviewed publications. The ASCL is indexed by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) and is citable by using the unique ascl ID assigned to each code. The ascl ID can be used to link to the code entry by prefacing the number with ascl.net (i.e., ascl.net/1201.001).


Most Recently Added Codes

2016 Sep 28

[ascl:1609.013] 21cmSense: Calculating the sensitivity of 21cm experiments to the EoR power spectrum

21cmSense calculates the expected sensitivities of 21cm experiments to the Epoch of Reionization power spectrum. Written in Python, it requires NumPy, SciPy, and AIPY (ascl:1609.012).

[ascl:1609.012] AIPY: Astronomical Interferometry in PYthon

AIPY collects together tools for radio astronomical interferometry. In addition to pure-python phasing, calibration, imaging, and deconvolution code, this package includes interfaces to MIRIAD (ascl:1106.007) and HEALPix (ascl:1107.018), and math/fitting routines from SciPy.

[ascl:1609.011] Photutils: Photometry tools

Photutils provides tools for detecting and performing photometry of astronomical sources. It can estimate the background and background rms in astronomical images, detect sources in astronomical images, estimate morphological parameters of those sources (e.g., centroid and shape parameters), and perform aperture and PSF photometry. Written in Python, it is an affiliated package of Astropy (ascl:1304.002).

[ascl:1609.010] CuBANz: Photometric redshift estimator

CuBANz is a photometric redshift estimator code for high redshift galaxies that uses the back propagation neural network along with clustering of the training set, making it very efficient. The training set is divided into several self learning clusters with galaxies having similar photometric properties and spectroscopic redshifts within a given span. The clustering algorithm uses the color information (i.e. u-g, g-r etc.) rather than the apparent magnitudes at various photometric bands, as the photometric redshift is more sensitive to the flux differences between different bands rather than the actual values. The clustering method enables accurate determination of the redshifts. CuBANz considers uncertainty in the photometric measurements as well as uncertainty in the neural network training. The code is written in C.

[ascl:1609.009] NSCool: Neutron star cooling code

NSCool is a 1D (i.e., spherically symmetric) neutron star cooling code written in Fortran 77. The package also contains a series of EOSs (equation of state) to build stars, a series of pre-built stars, and a TOV (Tolman- Oppenheimer-Volkoff) integrator to build stars from an EOS. It can also handle “strange stars” that have a huge density discontinuity between the quark matter and the covering thin baryonic crust. NSCool solves the heat transport and energy balance equations in whole GR, resulting in a time sequence of temperature profiles (and, in particular, a Teff - age curve). Several heating processes are included, and more can easily be incorporated. In particular it can evolve a star undergoing accretion with the resulting deep crustal heating, under a steady or time-variable accretion rate. NSCool is robust, very fast, and highly modular, making it easy to add new subroutines for new processes.

[ascl:1609.008] GRASP: General-purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Package

GRASP (General-purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Package) calculates atomic structure, including energy levels, radiative rates (A-values) and lifetimes; it is a fully relativistic code based on the jj coupling scheme.

[ascl:1609.007] Weighted EMPCA: Weighted Expectation Maximization Principal Component Analysis

Weighted EMPCA performs principal component analysis (PCA) on noisy datasets with missing values. Estimates of the measurement error are used to weight the input data such that the resulting eigenvectors, when compared to classic PCA, are more sensitive to the true underlying signal variations rather than being pulled by heteroskedastic measurement noise. Missing data are simply limiting cases of weight = 0. The underlying algorithm is a noise weighted expectation maximization (EM) PCA, which has additional benefits of implementation speed and flexibility for smoothing eigenvectors to reduce the noise contribution.

[ascl:1609.006] SCIMES: Spectral Clustering for Interstellar Molecular Emission Segmentation

SCIMES identifies relevant molecular gas structures within dendrograms of emission using the spectral clustering paradigm. It is useful for decomposing objects in complex environments imaged at high resolution.

[ascl:1609.005] FISHPACK90: Efficient FORTRAN Subprograms for the Solution of Separable Elliptic Partial Differential Equations

FISHPACK90 is a modernization of the original FISHPACK (ascl:1609.004), employing Fortran90 to slightly simplify and standardize the interface to some of the routines. This collection of Fortran programs and subroutines solves second- and fourth-order finite difference approximations to separable elliptic Partial Differential Equations (PDEs). These include Helmholtz equations in cartesian, polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates, as well as more general separable elliptic equations. The solvers use the cyclic reduction algorithm. When the problem is singular, a least-squares solution is computed. Singularities induced by the coordinate system are handled, including at the origin r=0 in cylindrical coordinates, and at the poles in spherical coordinates. Test programs are provided for the 19 solvers. Each serves two purposes: as a template to guide you in writing your own codes utilizing the FISHPACK90 solvers, and as a demonstration on your computer that you can correctly produce FISHPACK90 executables.

[ascl:1609.004] FISHPACK: Efficient FORTRAN Subprograms for the Solution of Separable Elliptic Partial Differential Equations

The FISHPACK collection of Fortran77 subroutines solves second- and fourth-order finite difference approximations to separable elliptic Partial Differential Equations (PDEs). These include Helmholtz equations in cartesian, polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates, as well as more general separable elliptic equations. The solvers use the cyclic reduction algorithm. When the problem is singular, a least-squares solution is computed. Singularities induced by the coordinate system are handled, including at the origin r=0 in cylindrical coordinates, and at the poles in spherical coordinates.