ASCL.net

Astrophysics Source Code Library

Making codes discoverable since 1999

Welcome to the ASCL

The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) is a free online registry for source codes of interest to astronomers and astrophysicists and lists codes that have been used in research that has appeared in, or been submitted to, peer-reviewed publications. The ASCL is indexed by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) and is citable by using the unique ascl ID assigned to each code. The ascl ID can be used to link to the code entry by prefacing the number with ascl.net (i.e., ascl.net/1201.001).


Most Recently Added Codes

2018 May 21

[submitted] CUBE: An information-optimized parallel cosmological N-body simulation Code

CUBE, written in Coarray Fortran, is a particle-mesh based parallel cosmological N-body simulation code. The memory usage of CUBE can approach as low as 6 bytes per particle. Particle pairwise (PP) force, cosmological neutrinos, spherical overdensity (SO) halofinder are included.

[submitted] SN SED Extrapolation Toolkit

SNSEDextend is a software package designed to extrapolate core-collapse and Type Ia Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) into the UV and IR, for use in simulations and photometric classifications. The user provides a library of existing SED templates (such as those in the SN SED Repository linked below), along with new photometric constraints in the UV and/or NIR wavelength ranges. This software then extends the existing template SEDs so that their colors match the input data at all phases.

This package also provides capabilities for extending the SALT2 spectral time-series model for Type Ia SN. Note that the SALT2 modifications enabled by this package are designed to do a "first-order" extrapolation of the SALT2 model components, suitable for use in survey simulations and photometric classification tools. This software does not do a rigorous re-training of the SALT2 model, so the results should not be relied on for precision applications, such as light curve fitting for cosmology.

[submitted] SN SED Repository

Repository of extrapolated Core-Collapse supernova (CC SN) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and an extended version of the Type Ia SALT2 model, constructed with the SNSEDextend Python package. These extended SN SEDs are suitable for use in survey simulations and photometric classification tools. See http://snsedextend.readthedocs.io for a description of the algorithm for extrapolation and the software toolkit available for users to make their own extrapolations.

2018 May 15

[ascl:1805.015] BinMag: Widget for comparing stellar observed with theoretical spectra

BinMag examines theoretical stellar spectra computed with Synth/SynthMag/Synmast/Synth3/SME spectrum synthesis codes and compare them to observations. An IDL widget program, BinMag applies radial velocity shift and broadening to the theoretical spectra to account for the effects of stellar rotation, radial-tangential macroturbulence, instrumental smearing. The code can also simulate spectra of spectroscopic binary stars by appropriate coaddition of two synthetic spectra. Additionally, BinMag can be used to measure equivalent width, fit line profile shapes with analytical functions, and to automatically determine radial velocity and broadening parameters. BinMag interfaces with the Synth3 (ascl:1212.010) and SME (ascl:1202.013) codes, allowing the user to determine chemical abundances and stellar atmospheric parameters from the observed spectra.

[ascl:1805.014] OSS: OSSOS Survey Simulator

Comparing properties of discovered trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs) with dynamical models is impossible due to the observational biases that exist in surveys. The OSSOS Survey Simulator takes an intrinsic orbital model (from, for example, the output of a dynamical Kuiper belt emplacement simulation) and applies the survey biases, so the biased simulated objects can be directly compared with real discoveries.

2018 May 13

[ascl:1805.013] grid-model: Semi-numerical reionization code

grid-model computes the time and spatially dependent ionization of neutral hydrogen (HI), neutral (HeI) and singly ionized helium (HeII) in the intergalactic medium (IGM). It accounts for recombinations and provides different descriptions for the photoionization rate that are used to calculate the residual HI fraction in ionized regions. The ionizing emissivity is directly derived from the RT simulation spectra.

[ascl:1805.012] Arcmancer: Geodesics and polarized radiative transfer library

Arcmancer computes geodesics and performs polarized radiative transfer in user-specified spacetimes. The library supports Riemannian and semi-Riemannian spaces of any dimension and metric; it also supports multiple simultaneous coordinate charts, embedded geometric shapes, local coordinate systems, and automatic parallel propagation. Arcmancer can be used to solve various problems in numerical geometry, such as solving the curve equation of motion using adaptive integration with configurable tolerances and differential equations along precomputed curves. It also provides support for curves with an arbitrary acceleration term and generic tools for generating ray initial conditions and performing parallel computation over the image, among other tools.

2018 May 09

[ascl:1805.011] PoMiN: A Post-Minkowskian N-Body Solver

PoMiN is a lightweight N-body code based on the Post-Minkowskian N-body Hamiltonian of Ledvinka, Schafer, and Bicak, which includes General Relativistic effects up to first order in Newton's constant G, and all orders in the speed of light c. PoMiN is a single file written in C and uses a fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration scheme. PoMiN has also been written to handle an arbitrary number of particles (both massive and massless) with a computational complexity that scales as O(N^2).

[submitted] xspec_emcee: XSPEC-friendly interface for the Python EMCEE package

XSPEC_EMCEE is an XSPEC-friendly interface for the pure-Python implementation of Goodman & Weare's Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) Hammer (ascl:1303.002) that allows to carry out MCMC analyses of X-ray spectra in the X-ray spectral fitting program XSPEC (ascl:9910.005). This program is able to run multiple xspec processes simultaneously, speeding up the analysis. It requires Python (2.5 or higher), numpy, argparse, h5py, emcee (ascl:1303.002), and xspec (ascl:9910.005).

[ascl:1805.010] StarSmasher: Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics code for smashing stars and planets

Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a Lagrangian particle method that approximates a continuous fluid as discrete nodes, each carrying various parameters such as mass, position, velocity, pressure, and temperature. In an SPH simulation the resolution scales with the particle density; StarSmasher is able to handle both equal-mass and equal number-density particle models. StarSmasher solves for hydro forces by calculating the pressure for each particle as a function of the particle's properties - density, internal energy, and internal properties (e.g. temperature and mean molecular weight). The code implements variational equations of motion and libraries to calculate the gravitational forces between particles using direct summation on NVIDIA graphics cards. Using a direct summation instead of a tree-based algorithm for gravity increases the accuracy of the gravity calculations at the cost of speed. The code uses a cubic spline for the smoothing kernel and an artificial viscosity prescription coupled with a Balsara Switch to prevent unphysical interparticle penetration. The code also implements an artificial relaxation force to the equations of motion to add a drag term to the calculated accelerations during relaxation integrations. Initially called StarCrash, StarSmasher was developed originally by Rasio.