ASCL.net

Astrophysics Source Code Library

Making codes discoverable since 1999

Welcome to the ASCL

The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) is a free online registry for source codes of interest to astronomers and astrophysicists and lists codes that have been used in research that has appeared in, or been submitted to, peer-reviewed publications. The ASCL is indexed by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) and is citable by using the unique ascl ID assigned to each code. The ascl ID can be used to link to the code entry by prefacing the number with ascl.net (i.e., ascl.net/1201.001).


Most Recently Added Codes

2015 Sep 04

[ascl:1509.001] XSHPipelineManager: Wrapper for the VLT/X-shooter Data Reduction Pipeline

XSHPipelineManager provides a framework for reducing spectroscopic observations taken by the X-shooter spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope. This Python code wraps recipes developed by the European Southern Observatory and runs the full X-shooter data reduction pipeline. The code offers full flexibility in terms of what data reduction recipes to include and which calibration files to use. During the data reduction chain restart-files are saved, making it possible to restart at any step in the chain.

2015 Sep 03

[submitted] MSWAVEF: Momentum-Space Wavefunctions

Code to calculate hydrogenic and non-hydrogenic momentum-space electronic wavefunctions is presented. Such wavefunctions are often required to calculate various collision processes, such as excitation and line broadening cross sections. The hydrogenic functions are calculated using the standard analytical expressions. The non-hydrogenic functions are calculated within quantum defect theory according to the method of Hoang Binh and van Regemorter (1997). Required Hankel transforms have been determined analytically for angular momentum quantum numbers ranging from zero to 13 using Mathematica. Calculations for higher angular momentum quantum numbers are possible, but slow. The code is written in IDL.

2015 Aug 31

[ascl:1508.010] SHDOM: Spherical Harmonic Discrete Ordinate Method for atmospheric radiative transfer

The Spherical Harmonic Discrete Ordinate Method (SHDOM) radiative transfer model computes polarized monochromatic or spectral band radiative transfer in a one, two, or three-dimensional medium for either collimated solar and/or thermal emission sources of radiation. The model is written in a variant of Fortran 77 and in Fortran90 and requires a Fortran 90 compiler. Also included are programs for generating the optical property files input to SHDOM from physical properties of water cloud particles and aerosols.

[submitted] TRUVOT: True Background Technique for the Swift UVOT Grisms

TRUVOT decontaminates Swift UVOT grism spectra for transient objects. The technique makes use of template images in a process similar to image subtraction.

2015 Aug 30

[ascl:1508.009] Trilogy: FITS image conversion software

Trilogy automatically scales and combines FITS images to produce color or grayscale images using Python scripts. The user assigns images to each color channel (RGB) or a single image to grayscale luminosity. Trilogy determines the intensity scaling automatically and independently in each channel to display faint features without saturating bright features. Each channel's scaling is determined based on a sample of the image (or summed images) and two input parameters. One parameter sets the output luminosity of "the noise," currently determined as 1-sigma above the sigma-clipped mean. The other parameter sets what fraction of the data (if any) in the sample region should be allowed to saturate. Default values for these parameters (0.15% and 0.001%, respectively) work well, but the user is able to adjust them. The scaling is accomplished using the logarithmic function y = a log(kx + 1) clipped between 0 and 1, where a and k are constants determined based on the data and desired scaling parameters as described above.

2015 Aug 29

[ascl:1508.008] NGMIX: Gaussian mixture models for 2D images

NGMIX implements Gaussian mixture models for 2D images. Both the PSF profile and the galaxy are modeled using mixtures of Gaussians. Convolutions are thus performed analytically, resulting in fast model generation as compared to methods that perform the convolution in Fourier space. For the galaxy model, NGMIX supports exponential disks and de Vaucouleurs and Sérsic profiles; these are implemented approximately as a sum of Gaussians using the fits from Hogg & Lang (2013). Additionally, any number of Gaussians can be fit, either completely free or constrained to be cocentric and co-elliptical.

[ascl:1508.007] TreeCorr: Two-point correlation functions

TreeCorr efficiently computes two-point correlation functions. It can compute correlations of regular number counts, weak lensing shears, or scalar quantities such as convergence or CMB temperature fluctuations. Two-point correlations may be auto-correlations or cross-correlations, including any combination of shear, kappa, and counts. Two-point functions can be done with correct curved-sky calculation using RA, Dec coordinates, on a Euclidean tangent plane, or in 3D using RA, Dec and a distance. The front end is written in Python, which can be used as a Python module or as a standalone executable using configuration files; the actual computation of the correlation functions is done in C++ using ball trees (similar to kd trees), making the calculation extremely efficient, and when available, OpenMP is used to run in parallel on multi-core machines.

[ascl:1508.006] SExSeg: SExtractor segmentation

SExSeg forces SExtractor (ascl:1010.064) to run using a pre-defined segmentation map (the definition of objects and their borders). The defined segments double as isophotal apertures. SExSeg alters the detection image based on a pre-defined segmenation map while preparing your "analysis image" by subtracting the background in a separate SExtractor run (using parameters you specify). SExtractor is then run in "double-image" mode with the altered detection image and background-subtracted analysis image.

[ascl:1508.005] ColorPro: PSF-corrected aperture-matched photometry

ColorPro automatically obtains robust colors across images of varied PSF. To correct for the flux lost in images with poorer PSF, the "detection image" is blurred to match the PSF of these other images, allowing observation of how much flux is lost. All photometry is performed in the highest resolution frame (images being aligned given WCS information in the FITS headers), and identical apertures are used in every image. Usually isophotal apertures are used, as determined by SExtractor (ascl:1010.064). Using SExSeg (ascl:1508.006), object aperture definitions can be pre-defined and object detections from different image filters can be combined automatically into a single comprehensive "segmentation map." After producing the final photometric catalog, ColorPro can automatically run BPZ (ascl:1108.011) to obtain Bayesian Photometric Redshifts.

[ascl:1508.004] FRELLED: FITS Realtime Explorer of Low Latency in Every Dimension

FRELLED (FITS Realtime Explorer of Low Latency in Every Dimension) creates 3D images in real time from 3D FITS files and is written in Python for the 3D graphics suite Blender. Users can interactively generate masks around regions of arbitrary geometry and use them to catalog sources, hide regions, and perform basic analysis (e.g., image statistics within the selected region, generate contour plots, query NED and the SDSS). World coordinates are supported and multi-volume rendering is possible. FRELLED is designed for viewing HI data cubes and provides a number of tasks to commonly-used MIRIAD (ascl:1106.007) tasks (e.g. mbspect); however, many of its features are suitable for any type of data set. It also includes an n-body particle viewer with the ability to display 3D vector information as well as the ability to render time series movies of multiple FITS files and setup simple turntable rotation movies for single files.