Astrophysics Source Code Library

Making codes discoverable since 1999

Welcome to the ASCL

The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) is a free online registry for source codes of interest to astronomers and astrophysicists and lists codes that have been used in research that has appeared in, or been submitted to, peer-reviewed publications. The ASCL is indexed by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) and is citable by using the unique ascl ID assigned to each code. The ascl ID can be used to link to the code entry by prefacing the number with (i.e.,

Most Recently Added Codes

2018 Mar 16

[submitted] DaCHS

DaCHS, the Data Center Helper Suite, is an integrated package for publishing astronomical data sets to the Virtual Observatory. Network-facing, it speaks the major VO protocols (SCS, SIAP, SSAP, TAP, Datalink, etc). Operator-facing, many input formats, including FITS/WCS, ASCII files, and VOTable, can be processed to publication-ready data. DaCHS puts particular emphasis on integrated metadata handling, which facilitates a tight integration with the VO's Registry

2018 Mar 14

[submitted] AstroCV - A computer vision library for Astronomy

We present AstroCV, a computer vision library for processing and analyzing big astronomical datasets.
The goal of AstroCV is to provide a community repository of high performance Python and C++ algorithms used in the areas of image processing and computer vision.

The current AstroCV library includes methods for the tasks of object recognition, segmentation and classification, with emphasis in the automatic detection and classification of galaxies.
The underlying models were trained using convolutional neural networks and deep learning techniques, which provide better results than methods based on manual feature engineering and SVMs.
The detection and classification methods were trained end-to-end using public datasets such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the Galaxy Zoo, and private datasets such as the Next Generation Virgo (NGVS) and Fornax (NGFS) surveys.

Training results are strongly bound to the conversion method from raw FITS data for each band into a 3-channel color image. Therefore, we propose data augmentation for the training using 5 conversion methods. This greatly improves the overall galaxy detection and classification for images produced from different instruments, bands and data reduction procedures.

The detection and classification methods were trained using the deep learning framework DARKNET and the real-time object detection system YOLO. These methods are implemented in C and CUDA languages and makes intensive use of graphical processing units (GPU). Using a single high-end Nvidia GPU card, it can process a SDSS image in 50 milliseconds and a DECam image in less than 3 seconds.

We provide the open source code, documentation, pre-trained networks, python tutorials for using the AstroCV library and train your own datasets.

2018 Mar 13

[ascl:1803.006] MulensModel: Microlensing light curves modeling

MulensModel calculates light curves of microlensing events. Both single and binary lens events are modeled and various higher-order effects can be included: extended source (with limb-darkening), annual microlensing parallax, and satellite microlensing parallax. The code is object-oriented and written in Python3, and requires AstroPy (ascl:1304.002).

2018 Mar 08

[ascl:1803.005] Kadenza: Kepler/K2 Raw Cadence Data Reader

Kadenza enables time-critical data analyses to be carried out using NASA's Kepler Space Telescope. It enables users to convert Kepler's raw data files into user-friendly Target Pixel Files upon downlink from the spacecraft. The primary motivation for this tool is to enable the microlensing, supernova, and exoplanet communities to create quicklook lightcurves for transient events which require rapid follow-up.

[ascl:1803.004] nanopipe: Calibration and data reduction pipeline for pulsar timing

nanopipe is a data reduction pipeline for calibration, RFI removal, and pulse time-of-arrival measurement from radio pulsar data. It was developed primarily for use by the NANOGrav project. nanopipe is written in Python, and depends on the PSRCHIVE (ascl:1105.014) library.

[ascl:1803.003] scarlet: Source separation in multi-band images by Constrained Matrix Factorization

SCARLET performs source separation (aka "deblending") on multi-band images. It is geared towards optical astronomy, where scenes are composed of stars and galaxies, but it is straightforward to apply it to other imaging data. Separation is achieved through a constrained matrix factorization, which models each source with a Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) and a non-parametric morphology, or multiple such components per source. The code performs forced photometry (with PSF matching if needed) using an optimal weight function given by the signal-to-noise weighted morphology across bands. The approach works well if the sources in the scene have different colors and can be further strengthened by imposing various additional constraints/priors on each source. Because of its generic utility, this package provides a stand-alone implementation that contains the core components of the source separation algorithm. However, the development of this package is part of the LSST Science Pipeline; the meas_deblender package contains a wrapper to implement the algorithms here for the LSST stack.

[ascl:1803.002] CIFOG: Cosmological Ionization Fields frOm Galaxies

CIFOG is a versatile MPI-parallelised semi-numerical tool to perform simulations of the Epoch of Reionization. From a set of evolving cosmological gas density and ionizing emissivity fields, it computes the time and spatially dependent ionization of neutral hydrogen (HI), neutral (HeI) and singly ionized helium (HeII) in the intergalactic medium (IGM). The code accounts for HII, HeII, HeIII recombinations, and provides different descriptions for the photoionization rate that are used to calculate the residual HI fraction in ionized regions. This tool has been designed to be coupled to semi-analytic galaxy formation models or hydrodynamical simulations. The modular fashion of the code allows the user to easily introduce new descriptions for recombinations and the photoionization rate.

2018 Mar 05

[submitted] PyVO: a package providing access to the Virtual observatory (VO) using Python

PyVO is a package providing access to remote data and services of the Virtual observatory (VO) using Python. It takes advantage VO standards to interface to tens of thousands of catalogs, data archives, information services, and analysis tools. PyVO is built on top of Astopy (and numpy).

The VO protocols support by pyVO include the Table Access Protocol TAP, the Simple Image and Spectra Access Protocols (SIAP, SSAP), Simple Cone Search (SCS), the VO services interface VOSI, and Datalink.

2018 Mar 02

[ascl:1803.001] DaMaSCUS-CRUST: Dark Matter Simulation Code for Underground Scatterings - Crust Edition

DaMaSCUS-CRUST determines the critical cross-section for strongly interacting DM for various direct detection experiments systematically and precisely using Monte Carlo simulations of DM trajectories inside the Earth's crust, atmosphere, or any kind of shielding. Above a critical dark matter-nucleus scattering cross section, any terrestrial direct detection experiment loses sensitivity to dark matter, since the Earth crust, atmosphere, and potential shielding layers start to block off the dark matter particles. This critical cross section is commonly determined by describing the average energy loss of the dark matter particles analytically. However, this treatment overestimates the stopping power of the Earth crust; therefore, the obtained bounds should be considered as conservative. DaMaSCUS-CRUST is a modified version of DaMaSCUS (ascl:1706.003) that accounts for shielding effects and returns a precise exclusion band.

2018 Mar 01

[ascl:1802.016] eqpair: Electron energy distribution calculator

eqpair computes the electron energy distribution resulting from a balance between heating and direct acceleration of particles, and cooling processes. Electron-positron pair balance, bremstrahlung, and Compton cooling, including external soft photon input, are among the processes considered, and the final electron distribution can be hybrid, thermal, or non-thermal.