ASCL.net

Astrophysics Source Code Library

Making codes discoverable since 1999

Welcome to the ASCL

The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) is a free online registry for source codes of interest to astronomers and astrophysicists, including solar system astronomers, and lists codes that have been used in research that has appeared in, or been submitted to, peer-reviewed publications. The ASCL is indexed by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) and Web of Science and is citable by using the unique ascl ID assigned to each code. The ascl ID can be used to link to the code entry by prefacing the number with ascl.net (i.e., ascl.net/1201.001).


Most Recently Added Codes

2020 Apr 01

[ascl:2003.014] Torch: Coupled gas and N-body dynamics simulator

Torch simulates coupled gas and N-body dynamics in astrophysical systems such as newly forming star clusters. It combines the FLASH (ascl:1010.082) code for gas dynamics and the ph4 code for direct N-body evolution via the AMUSE framework.

2020 Mar 31

[ascl:2003.013] AstroHOG: Analysis correlations using the Histograms of Oriented Gradients

AstroHOG compares extended spectral-line observations (PPV cubes); the histogram of oriented gradients (HOG) technique takes as input two PPV cubes and provides an estimate of their spatial correlation across velocity channels to study spatial correlation between different tracers of the ISM.

[ascl:2003.012] PYSOLATOR: Remove orbital modulation from a binary pulsar and/or its companion

PYSOLATOR removes the orbital modulation from a binary pulsar and/or its companion. In essence, it subtracts the predicted Roemer delay for the given orbit and then resamples the time series so as to make the signal appear as if it were emitted from the barycenter of the binary system, making the search for pulses easier and faster.

[ascl:2003.011] HOMER: MCMC-based inverse modeling code

HOMER (Helper Of My Eternal Retrievals) is an MCMC-based inverse modeling code. Given some data and uncertainties, the code determines the posterior distribution of a model. HOMER uses MC3 (ascl:1610.013) for its MCMC; its forward model is a neural network (NN) surrogate model trained by MARGE (ascl:2003.010). The code produces plots of the 1D marginalized posteriors, 2D pairwise posteriors, and parameter history traces, and can also overplot the 1D and 2D posteriors for multiple MCMC runs for comparison with other retrieval results. HOMER also computes the Bhattacharyya coefficient to compare the similarity of 1D marginalized posteriors.

[ascl:2003.010] MARGE: Machine learning Algorithm for Radiative transfer of Generated Exoplanets

MARGE (Machine learning Algorithm for Radiative transfer of Generated Exoplanets) generates exoplanet spectra across a defined parameter space, processes the output, and trains, validates, and tests machine learning models as a fast approximation to radiative transfer. It uses BART (ascl:1608.004) for spectra generation and modifies BART’s Bayesian sampler with a random uniform sampler to propose models within a defined parameter space. Due to the possible data size, MARGE also modifies MC3 (ascl:1610.013) to save out the evaluated models in batches.

[ascl:2003.009] TOASTER: Times-Of-Arrival Tracker

TOASTER is a pulse times-of-arrival (TOA) tracker. It stores reduced/folded observations, meta data, templates, parfiles, TOAs, and timefiles in an organized manner using an SQL database. TOASTER also provides a full-featured python toolkit for reliably interacting with the data and database, and provides scripts that, for example, list and summarize the TOAs in the data base, and generate TOA files in multiple formats. The framework can also be used to generate TOAs from observations using flexible and reproducible plugins referred to as "manipulators".

[ascl:2003.008] CoastGuard: Automated timing data reduction pipeline

CoastGuard reduces Effelsberg data; it is written in python and based on PSRCHIVE (ascl:1105.014). Though primarily designed for Effelsberg PSRIX data, it contains components sufficiently general for use with psrchive-compatible data files from other observing systems. In particular, the radio frequency interference (RFI) removal algorithm has been applied to data from the Parkes Telescope and has also been adopted by the LOFAR pulsar timing data reduction pipeline.

[ascl:2003.007] RAPID: Real-time Automated Photometric IDentification

RAPID (Real-time Automated Photometric IDentification) classifies multiband photometric light curves into several different transient classes. It uses a deep recurrent neural network to produce time-varying classifications, and because it does not rely on deriving computationally expensive features from the data, it is well suited for processing alerts that wide-field surveys such as the Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will produce.

[ascl:2003.006] PORTAL: POlarized Radiative Transfer Adapted to Lines

PORTAL (POlarized Radiative Transfer Adapted to Lines), a 3D polarized radiative transfer code, simulates the emergence of polarization in the emission of atomic or molecular (sub-)millimeter lines. Written in Fortran90, PORTAL can be used in standalone mode or can process the output of other 3D radiative transfer codes

[ascl:2003.005] RHT: Rolling Hough Transform

The RHT (Rolling Hough Transform) measures linear intensity as a function of orientation in images. The machine vision algorithm quantifies the alignment of H I fibers with the magnetic field, and allows mapping of detailed structure in a magnetic field, suggesting that this technique can be used for for resolved field strength estimation.