ASCL.net

Astrophysics Source Code Library

Making codes discoverable since 1999

Welcome to the ASCL

The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) is a free online registry for source codes of interest to astronomers and astrophysicists, including solar system astronomers, and lists codes that have been used in research that has appeared in, or been submitted to, peer-reviewed publications. The ASCL is indexed by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) and Web of Science and is citable by using the unique ascl ID assigned to each code. The ascl ID can be used to link to the code entry by prefacing the number with ascl.net (i.e., ascl.net/1201.001).


Most Recently Added Codes

2019 Nov 01

[submitted] PLAN: A Clump-finder for Planetesimal Formation Simulations

PLAN (PLanetesimal ANalyzer) identifies and characterizes planetesimals produced in numerical simulations of the Streaming Instability that includes particle self-gravity with code Athena (ascl:1010.014). PLAN works with the 3D particle output of Athena and finds gravitationally bound clumps robustly and efficiently. PLAN — written in C++ with OpenMP/MPI — is massively parallelized, memory-efficient, and scalable to analyze billions of particles and multiple snapshots simultaneously. The approach of PLAN is based on the dark matter halo finder HOP (ascl:1102.019), but with many customizations for planetesimal formation. PLAN can be easily adapted to analyze other object formation simulations that use Lagrangian particles (e.g., Athena++ simulations). PLAN is also equipped with a toolkit to analyze the grid-based hydro data (VTK dumps of primitive variables) from Athena, which requires Boost MultiDimensional Array Library.

2019 Oct 31

[ascl:1910.022] qnm: Kerr quasinormal modes, separation constants, and spherical-spheroidal mixing coefficients calculator

qnm computes the Kerr quasinormal mode frequencies, angular separation constants, and spherical-spheroidal mixing coefficients. The qnm package includes a Leaver solver with the Cook-Zalutskiy spectral approach to the angular sector, and a caching mechanism to avoid repeating calculations. A large cache of low ℓ, m, n modes is available for download and can be installed with a single function call and interpolated to provide good initial guess for root-polishing at new values of spin.

[ascl:1910.021] AOtools: Adaptive optics modeling and analysis toolkit

The AOtools package offers generic adaptive optics processing tools in addition to astronomy-specific methods; among these are analyzing data in the pupil plane, images and point spread functions in the focal plane, wavefront sensors, modeling of atmospheric turbulence, physical optical propagation of wavefronts, and conversion functions to convert stellar brightness into photon flux for a given waveband. The software also calculates integrated atmospheric parameters, such as coherence time and isoplanatic angle from atmospheric turbulence and wind speed profile.

[ascl:1910.020] OCD: O'Connell Effect Detector using push-pull learning

OCD (O'Connell Effect Detector) detects eclipsing binaries that demonstrate the O'Connell Effect. This time-domain signature extraction methodology uses a supporting supervised pattern detection algorithm. The methodology maps stellar variable observations (time-domain data) to a new representation known as Distribution Fields (DF), the properties of which enable efficient handling of issues such as irregular sampling and multiple values per time instance. Using this representation, the code applies a metric learning technique directly on the DF space capable of specifically identifying the stars of interest; the metric is tuned on a set of labeled eclipsing binary data from the Kepler survey, targeting particular systems exhibiting the O’Connell Effect. This code is useful for large-scale data volumes such as that expected from next generation telescopes such as LSST.

[ascl:1910.019] Cobaya: Bayesian analysis in cosmology

Cobaya (Code for BAYesian Analysis) provides a framework for sampling and statistical modeling and enables exploration of an arbitrary prior or posterior using a range of Monte Carlo samplers, including the advanced MCMC sampler from CosmoMC (ascl:1106.025) and the advanced nested sampler PolyChord (ascl:1502.011). The results of the sampling can be analyzed with GetDist (ascl:1910.018). It supports MPI parallelization and is highly extensible, allowing the user to define priors and likelihoods and create new parameters as functions of other parameters.

It includes interfaces to the cosmological theory codes CAMB (ascl:1102.026) and CLASS (ascl:1106.020) and likelihoods of cosmological experiments, such as Planck, Bicep-Keck, and SDSS. Automatic installers are included for those external modules; Cobaya can also be used as a wrapper for cosmological models and likelihoods, and integrated it in other samplers and pipelines. The interfaces to most cosmological likelihoods are agnostic as to which theory code is used to compute the observables, which facilitates comparison between those codes. Those interfaces are also parameter-agnostic, allowing use of modified versions of theory codes and likelihoods without additional editing of Cobaya’s source.

[ascl:1910.018] GetDist: Monte Carlo sample analyzer

GetDist analyzes Monte Carlo samples, including correlated samples from Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). It offers a point and click GUI for selecting chain files, viewing plots, marginalized constraints, and LaTeX tables, and includes a plotting library for making custom publication-ready 1D, 2D, 3D-scatter, triangle and other plots. Its convergence diagnostics include correlation length and diagonalized Gelman-Rubin statistics, and the optimized kernel density estimation provides an automated optimal bandwidth choice for 1D and 2D densities with boundary and bias correction. It is available as a standalong package and with CosmoMC (ascl:1106.025).

[ascl:1910.017] ChainConsumer: Corner plots, LaTeX tables and plotting walks

ChainConsumer consumes the chains output from Monte Carlo processes such as MCMC to produce plots of the posterior surface inferred from the chain distributions, to plot the chains as walks to check for mixing and convergence, and to output parameter summaries in the form of LaTeX tables. It handles multiple models (chains), allowing for model comparison using AIC, BIC or DIC metrics.

[ascl:1910.016] MiSTree: Construct and analyze Minimum Spanning Tree graphs

MiSTree quickly constructs minimum spanning tree graphs for various coordinate systems, including Celestial coordinates, by using a k-nearest neighbor graph (k NN, rather than a matrix of pairwise distances) which is then fed to Kruskal's algorithm to create the graph. MiSTree bins the MST statistics into histograms and plots the distributions; enabling the inclusion of high-order statistics information from the cosmic web to provide additional information that improves cosmological parameter constraints. Though MiSTree was designed for use in cosmology, it can be used in any field requiring extracting non-Gaussian information from point distributions.

2019 Oct 30

[ascl:1910.015] MarsLux: Illumination Mars maps generator

MarsLux generates illumination maps of Mars from Digital Terrain Model (DTM), permitting users to investigate in detail the illumination conditions on Mars based on its topography and the relative position of the Sun. MarsLux consists of two Python codes, SolaPar and MarsLux. SolaPar calculates the matrix with solar parameters for one date or a range between the two. The Marslux code generates the illumination maps using the same DTM and the files generated by SolaPar. The resulting illumination maps show areas that are fully illuminated, areas in total shadow, and areas with partial shade, and can be used for geomorphological studies to examine gullies, thermal weathering, or mass wasting processes as well as for producing energy budget maps for future exploration missions.

[ascl:1910.014] ANNz2: Estimating photometric redshift and probability density functions using machine learning methods

ANNz2, a newer implementation of ANNz (ascl:1209.009), utilizes multiple machine learning methods such as artificial neural networks, boosted decision/regression trees and k-nearest neighbors to measure photo-zs based on limited spectral data. The code dynamically optimizes the performance of the photo-z estimation and properly derives the associated uncertainties. In addition to single-value solutions, ANNz2 also generates full probability density functions (PDFs) in two different ways. In addition, estimators are incorporated to mitigate possible problems of spectroscopic training samples which are not representative or are incomplete. ANNz2 is also adapted to provide optimized solutions to general classification problems, such as star/galaxy separation.