ASCL.net

Astrophysics Source Code Library

Making codes discoverable since 1999

Welcome to the ASCL

The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) is a free online registry for source codes of interest to astronomers and astrophysicists, including solar system astronomers, and lists codes that have been used in research that has appeared in, or been submitted to, peer-reviewed publications. The ASCL is indexed by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) and Web of Science and is citable by using the unique ascl ID assigned to each code. The ascl ID can be used to link to the code entry by prefacing the number with ascl.net (i.e., ascl.net/1201.001).


Most Recently Added Codes

2022 Nov 22

[submitted] PAHDecomp: Decomposing the mid-IR spectra of extremely obscured galaxies.

PAHDecomp (Donnan et al. 2022a) is a tool for modelling mid-infrared spectra of galaxies based on the popular PAHFIT code Smith et al. 2007. Unlike PAHFIT this model decomposes the continuum into a star-forming component and an obscured nuclear component based on Bayesian priors on the shape of the star-forming component (using templates + prior on extinction). This makes this tool ideally suited for modelling the spectra of heavily obscured galaxies, where PAHFIT struggles. This tool successfully recovers properties of Compact Obscured Nuclei (CONs) where the inferred nuclear optical depth strongly correlates with the surface brightness of HCN-vib emission in the millimetre. This is currently set up to run on the short low modules of Spitzer IRS data (5.2 - 14.2 microns) but will be ideal for JWST/MIRI MRS data in the future.

2022 Nov 18

[submitted] AMBER

The Abundance Matching Box for the Epoch of Reionization (AMBER) is a semi-numerical code for modeling the cosmic dawn. The code has the unique advantage of allowing users to directly specify the reionization history through the redshift midpoint, duration, and asymmetry input parameters. The reionization process is further controlled through the minimum halo mass for galaxy formation and the radiation mean free path for radiative transfer. The parallelized code is over four orders of magnitude faster than radiative transfer simulations and will efficiently enable large-volume models, full-sky mock observations, and parameter-space studies.

2022 Nov 17

[submitted] Analytical propagator with collision detection for Keplerian systems

This code is an analytic propagator with collision detection for Keplerian systems.
The algorithm maintains a list of collision possibilities and jumps from one collision to the next.
It was used in the thesis that can be found here: http://resolver.tudelft.nl/uuid:a5764b08-9dca-4398-9309-fb99fe3a271d.

2022 Nov 15

[submitted] PTAfast

Fast python code for the calculation of stochastic gravitational wave background spatial correlations in a pulsar timing array. This is based on a power spectrum formalism discussed in detail in arXiv:2208.12538 and arXiv:2209.14834.

2022 Oct 30

[ascl:2210.030] cuvarbase: fast period finding utilities for GPUs

cuvarbase provides a Python library for performing period finding (Lomb-Scargle, Phase Dispersion Minimization, Conditional Entropy, Box-least squares) on astronomical time-series datasets. Speedups over CPU implementations depend on the algorithm, dataset, and GPU capabilities but are typically ~1-2 orders of magnitude and are especially high for BLS and Lomb-Scargle.

[ascl:2210.029] paltas: Simulation-based inference on strong gravitational lensing systems

paltas conducts simulation-based inference on strong gravitational lensing images. It builds on lenstronomy (ascl:1804.012) to create large datasets of strong lensing images with realistic low-mass halos, Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observational effects, and galaxy light from HST's COSMOS field. paltas also includes the capability to easily train neural posterior estimators of the parameters of the lensing system and to run hierarchical inference on test populations.

[ascl:2210.028] CK: Cloud modeling and removal

Cloud Killer recovers surface albedo maps by using reflected light photometry to map the clouds and surface of unresolved exoplanets. For light curves with negligible photometric uncertainties, the minimal top-of-atmosphere albedo at a location is a good estimate of its surface albedo. On synthetic data, it shows little bias, good precision, and accuracy, but slightly underestimated uncertainties; exoplanets with large, changing cloud structures observed near quadrature phases are good candidates for Cloud Killer cloud removal.

[ascl:2210.027] LensingETC: Lensing Exposure Time Calculator

LensingETC optimizes observing strategies for multi-filter imaging campaigns of galaxy-scale strong lensing systems. It uses the lens modelling software lenstronomy (ascl:1804.012) to simulate and model mock imaging data, forecasts the lens model parameter uncertainties, and optimizes observing strategies.

[ascl:2210.026] PGOPHER: Rotational, vibrational, and electronic spectra simulator

PGOPHER simulates and fits rotational, vibrational, and electronic spectra. It handles linear molecules and symmetric and asymmetric tops, including effects due to unpaired electrons and nuclear spin, with a separate mode for vibrational structure. The code performs many sorts of transitions, including Raman, multiphoton, and forbidden transitions. It can simulate multiple species and states simultaneously, including special effects such as perturbations and state dependent predissociation. Fitting can be to line positions, intensities, or band contours. PGOPHER uses a standard graphical user interface and makes comparison with, and fitting to, spectra from various sources easy. In addition to overlaying numerical spectra, it is also possible to overlay pictures from pdf files and even plate spectra to assist in checking that published constants are being used correctly.

2022 Oct 29

[ascl:2210.025] tvguide: Observability by TESS

tvguide determines whether stars and galaxies are observable by TESS. It uses an object's right ascension and declination and estimates the pointing of TESS's cameras using predicted spacecraft ephemerides to determine whether and for how long the object is observable with TESS. tvguide returns a file with two columns, the first the minimum number of sectors the target is observable for and the second the maximum.