ASCL.net

Astrophysics Source Code Library

Making codes discoverable since 1999

Keywords

A list of keywords associated with codes in the ASCL.

NASA (134), Kepler (28), Spitzer (13), TESS (8), Fermi (6), HITS (5), HST (5), ROSAT (4), CGRO (3), RXTE (3), Swift (3), ASCA (2), Chandra (2), COBE (2), Geotail (2), Heliophysics (2), Herschel (2), LRO (2), Magellan (2), MRO (2), NICER (2), Polar (2), Rosetta (2), Wind (2), WISE (2), WMAP (2), Apollo (1), Cassini (1), Dawn (1), GOES (1), Hinode (1), Hitomi (1), InSight (1), INTEGRAL (1), ISO (1), Juno (1), JWST (1), Lucy (1), Lunar Quest (1), MAVEN (1), MESSENGER (1), MGS (1), NEAR (1), New Horizons (1), NISAR (1), NuSTAR (1), OSIRIS-REx (1), Parker Solar Probe (1), Psyche (1), RHESSI (1), SOFIA (1), SOHO (1), STEREO (1), Suzaku (1), THEMIS (1), TRMM (1)

Codes associated with 'TESS'

[ascl:1611.008] Transit Clairvoyance: Predicting multiple-planet systems for TESS

Transit Clairvoyance uses Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) to predict the most likely short period transiters to have additional transiters, which may double the discovery yield of the TESS (Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite). Clairvoyance is a simple 2-D interpolant that takes in the number of planets in a system with period less than 13.7 days, as well as the maximum radius amongst them (in Earth radii) and orbital period of the planet with maximum radius (in Earth days) in order to predict the probability of additional transiters in this system with period greater than 13.7 days.

[ascl:1807.029] EVEREST: Tools for de-trending stellar photometry

EVEREST (EPIC Variability Extraction and Removal for Exoplanet Science Targets) removes instrumental noise from light curves with pixel level decorrelation and Gaussian processes. The code, written in Python, generates the EVEREST catalog and offers tools for accessing and interacting with the de-trended light curves. EVEREST exploits correlations across the pixels on the CCD to remove systematics introduced by the spacecraft’s pointing error. For K2, it yields light curves with precision comparable to that of the original Kepler mission. Interaction with the EVEREST catalog catalog is available via the command line and through the Python interface. Though written for K2, EVEREST can be applied to additional surveys, such as the TESS mission, to correct for instrumental systematics and enable the detection of low signal-to-noise transiting exoplanets.

[ascl:1812.013] Lightkurve: Kepler and TESS time series analysis in Python

Lightkurve analyzes astronomical flux time series data, in particular the pixels and light curves obtained by NASA’s Kepler, K2, and TESS exoplanet missions. This community-developed Python package is designed to be user friendly to lower the barrier for students, astronomers, and citizen scientists interested in analyzing data from these missions. Lightkurve provides easy tools to download, inspect, and analyze time series data and its documentation is supported by a large syllabus of tutorials.

[ascl:1904.022] eleanor: Extracted and systematics-corrected light curves for TESS-observed stars

eleanor extracts target pixel files from TESS Full Frame Images and produces systematics-corrected light curves for any star observed by the TESS mission. eleanor takes a TIC ID, a Gaia source ID, or (RA, Dec) coordinates of a star observed by TESS and returns, as a single object, a light curve and accompanying target pixel data. The process can be customized, allowing, for example, examination of intermediate data products and changing the aperture used for light curve extraction. eleanor also offers tools that make it easier to work with stars observed in multiple TESS sectors.

[ascl:1907.014] sbpy: Small-body planetary astronomy

sbpy, an Astropy affiliated package, supplements functionality provided by Astropy (ascl:1304.002) with functions and methods that are frequently used for planetary astronomy with a clear focus on asteroids and comets. It offers access tools for various databases for orbital and physical data, spectroscopy analysis tools and models, photometry models for resolved and unresolved observations, ephemerides services, and other tools useful for small-body planetary astronomy.

[ascl:1908.005] dips: Detrending periodic signals in timeseries

dips detrends timeseries of strictly periodic signals. It does not assume any functional form for the signal or the background or the noise; it disentangles the strictly periodic component from everything else. It has been used for detrending Kepler, K2 and TESS timeseries of periodic variable stars, eclipsing binary stars, and exoplanets.

[ascl:2002.004] triceratops: Candidate exoplanet rating tool

triceratops (Tool for Rating Interesting Candidate Exoplanets and Reliability Analysis of Transits Originating from Proximate Stars) validates planet candidates from the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS). The code calculates the probabilities of a wide range of transit-producing scenarios using the primary transit of the planet candidate and preexisting knowledge of its host and nearby stars. It then uses the known properties of these stars to calculate star-specific priors for each scenario with estimates of stellar multiplicity and planet occurrence rates.

[ascl:2003.001] TESS-Point: High precision TESS pointing tool

TESS-Point converts astronomical target coordinates given in right ascension and declination to detector pixel coordinates for the MIT-led NASA Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) spacecraft. The program can also provide detector pixel coordinates for a star by TESS input catalog identifier number and common astronomical name. Tess-point outputs the observing sector number, camera number, detector number, and pixel column and row.