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[ascl:1703.004] PHOTOMETRYPIPELINE: Automated photometry pipeline

PHOTOMETRYPIPELINE (PP) provides calibrated photometry from imaging data obtained with small to medium-sized observatories. PP uses Source Extractor (ascl:1010.064) and SCAMP (ascl:1010.063) to register the image data and perform aperture photometry. Calibration is obtained through matching of field stars with reliable photometric catalogs. PP has been specifically designed for the measurement of asteroid photometry, but can also be used to obtain photometry of fixed sources.

[ascl:1408.022] PhotoRApToR: PHOTOmetric Research APplication TO Redshifts

PhotoRApToR (PHOTOmetric Research APplication TO Redshifts) solves regression and classification problems and is specialized for photo-z estimation. PhotoRApToR offers data table manipulation capabilities and 2D and 3D graphics tools for data visualization; it also provides a statistical report for both classification and regression experiments. The code is written in Java; the machine learning model is in C++ to increase the core execution speed.

[ascl:1609.011] Photutils: Photometry tools

Photutils provides tools for detecting and performing photometry of astronomical sources. It can estimate the background and background rms in astronomical images, detect sources in astronomical images, estimate morphological parameters of those sources (e.g., centroid and shape parameters), and perform aperture and PSF photometry. Written in Python, it is an affiliated package of Astropy (ascl:1304.002).

[ascl:1112.004] PHOX: X-ray Photon Simulator

PHOX is a novel, virtual X-ray observatory designed to obtain synthetic observations from hydro-numerical simulations. The code is a photon simulator and can be apply to simulate galaxy clusters. In fact, X-ray observations of clusters of galaxies continue to provide us with an increasingly detailed picture of their structure and of the underlying physical phenomena governing the gaseous component, which dominates their baryonic content. Therefore, it is fundamental to find the most direct and faithful way to compare such observational data with hydrodynamical simulations of cluster-like objects, which can currently include various complex physical processes. Here, we present and analyse synthetic Suzaku observations of two cluster-size haloes obtained by processing with PHOX the hydrodynamical simulation of the large-scale, filament-like region in which they reside. Taking advantage of the simulated data, we test the results inferred from the X-ray analysis of the mock observations against the underlying, known solution. Remarkably, we are able to recover the theoretical temperature distribution of the two haloes by means of the multi-temperature fitting of the synthetic spectra. Moreover, the shapes of the reconstructed distributions allow us to trace the different thermal structure that distinguishes the dynamical state of the two haloes.

[ascl:1408.003] PIA: ISOPHOT Interactive Analysis

ISOPHOT is one of the instruments on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). ISOPHOT Interactive Analysis (PIA) is a scientific and calibration interactive data analysis tool for ISOPHOT data reduction. Written in IDL under Xwindows, PIA offers a full context sensitive graphical interface for retrieving, accessing and analyzing ISOPHOT data. It is available in two nearly identical versions; a general observers version omits the calibration sequences.

[ascl:1412.007] PIAO: Python spherIcAl Overdensity code

PIAO is an efficient memory-controlled Python code that uses the standard spherical overdensity (SO) algorithm to identify halos. PIAO employs two additional parameters besides the overdensity Δc. The first is the mesh-box size, which splits the whole simulation box into smaller ones then analyzes them one-by-one, thereby overcoming a possible memory limitation problem that can occur when dealing with high-resolution, large-volume simulations. The second is the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) neighbors number, which is used for the SPH density calculation.

[ascl:1610.001] Piccard: Pulsar timing data analysis package

Piccard is a Bayesian-inference pipeline for Pulsar Timing Array (PTA) data and interacts with Tempo2 (ascl:1210.015) through libstempo. The code is use mainly for single-pulsar analysis and gravitational-wave detection purposes of full Pulsar Timing Array datasets. Modeling of the data can include correlated signals per frequency or modeled spectrum, with uniform, dipolar, quadrupolar, or anisotropic correlations; multiple error bars and EFACs per pulsar; and white and red noise. Timing models can be numerically included, either by using the design matrix (linear timing model), or by calling libstempo for the full non-linear timing model. Many types of samplers are included. For common-mode mitigation, the signals can be reconstructed mitigating arbitrary signals simultaneously.

[ascl:1306.011] Pico: Parameters for the Impatient Cosmologist

Pico is an algorithm that quickly computes the CMB scalar, tensor and lensed power spectra, the matter transfer function and the WMAP 5 year likelihood. It is intended to accelerate parameter estimation codes; Pico can compute the CMB power spectrum and matter transfer function, as well as any computationally expensive likelihoods, in a few milliseconds. It is extremely fast and accurate over a large volume of parameter space and its accuracy can be improved by using a larger training set. More generally, Pico allows using massively parallel computing resources, including distributed computing projects such as Cosmology@Home, to speed up the slow steps in inherently sequential calculations.

[ascl:1607.009] PICsar: Particle in cell pulsar magnetosphere simulator

PICsar simulates the magnetosphere of an aligned axisymmetric pulsar and can be used to simulate other arbitrary electromagnetics problems in axisymmetry. Written in Fortran, this special relativistic, electromagnetic, charge conservative particle in cell code features stretchable body-fitted coordinates that follow the surface of a sphere, simplifying the application of boundary conditions in the case of the aligned pulsar; a radiation absorbing outer boundary, which allows a steady state to be set up dynamically and maintained indefinitely from transient initial conditions; and algorithms for injection of charged particles into the simulation domain. PICsar is parallelized using MPI and has been used on research problems with ~1000 CPUs.

[ascl:1408.014] pieflag: CASA task to efficiently flag bad data

pieflag compares bandpass-calibrated data to a clean reference channel and identifies and flags essentially all bad data. pieflag compares visibility amplitudes in each frequency channel to a 'reference' channel that is rfi-free (or manually ensured to be rfi-free). pieflag performs this comparison independently for each correlation on each baseline, but will flag all correlations if threshold conditions are met. To operate effectively, pieflag must be supplied with bandpass-calibrated data. pieflag has two core modes of operation (static and dynamic flagging) with an additional extend mode; the type of data largely determines which mode to choose. Instructions for pre-processing data and selecting the mode of operation are provided in the help file. Once pre-processing and selecting the mode of operation are done, pieflag should work well 'out of the box' with its default parameters.

[ascl:1407.012] PINGSoft2: Integral Field Spectroscopy Software

PINGSoft2 visualizes, manipulates and analyzes integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data based on either 3D cubes or Raw Stacked Spectra (RSS) format. Any IFS data can be adapted to work with PINGSoft2, regardless of the original data format and the size/shape of the spaxel. Written in IDL, PINGSoft2 is optimized for fast visualization rendering; it also includes various routines useful for generic astronomy and spectroscopy tasks.

[ascl:1305.007] PINOCCHIO: PINpointing Orbit-Crossing Collapsed HIerarchical Objects

PINOCCHIO generates catalogues of cosmological dark matter halos with known mass, position, velocity and merger history. It is able to reproduce, with very good accuracy, the hierarchical formation of dark matter halos from a realization of an initial (linear) density perturbation field, given on a 3D grid. Its setup is similar to that of a conventional N-body simulation, but it is based on the powerful Lagrangian Perturbation Theory. It runs in just a small fraction of the computing time taken by an equivalent N-body simulation, producing promptly the merging histories of all halos in the catalog.

[ascl:1007.001] PINTofALE: Package for Interactive Analysis of Line Emission

PINTofALE was originally developed to analyze spectroscopic data from optically-thin coronal plasmas, though much of the software is sufficiently general to be of use in a much wider range of astrophysical data analyses. It is based on a modular set of IDL tools that interact with an atomic database and with observational data. The tools are designed to allow easy identification of spectral features, measure line fluxes, and carry out detailed modeling. The basic philosophy of the package is to provide access to the innards of atomic line databases, and to have flexible tools to interactively compare with the observed data. It is motivated by the large amount of book-keeping, computation and iterative interaction that is required between the researcher and observational and theoretical data in order to derive astrophysical results. The tools link together transparently and automatically the processes of spectral "browsing", feature identification, measurement, and computation and derivation of results. Unlike standard modeling and fitting engines currently in use, PINTofALE opens up the "black box" of atomic data required for UV/X-ray analyses and allows the user full control over the data that are used in any given analysis.

[ascl:1611.015] Pippi: Parse and plot MCMC chains

Pippi (parse it, plot it) operates on MCMC chains and related lists of samples from a function or distribution, and can merge, parse, and plot sample ensembles ('chains') either in terms of the likelihood/fitness function directly, or as implied posterior probability densities. Pippi is compatible with ASCII text and hdf5 chains, operates out of core, and can post-process chains on the fly.

[ascl:1405.012] PISA: Position Intensity and Shape Analysis

PISA (Position, Intensity and Shape Analysis) routines deal with the location and parameterization of objects on an image frame. The core of this package is the routine PISAFIND which performs image analysis on a 2-dimensional data frame. The program searches the data array for objects that have a minimum number of connected pixels above a given threshold and extracts the image parameters (position, intensity, shape) for each object. The image parameters can be determined using thresholding techniques or an analytical stellar profile can be used to fit the objects. In crowded regions deblending of overlapping sources can be performed. PISA is distributed as part of the Starlink software collection (ascl:1110.012).

[ascl:1102.007] PixeLens: A Portable Modeler of Lensed Quasars

We introduce and implement two novel ideas for modeling lensed quasars. The first is to require different lenses to agree about H0. This means that some models for one lens can be ruled out by data on a different lens. We explain using two worked examples. One example models 1115+080 and 1608+656 (time-delay quadruple systems) and 1933+503 (a prospective time-delay system) all together, yielding time-delay predictions for the third lens and a 90% confidence estimate of H0-1=14.6+9.4-1.7 Gyr (H0=67+9-26 km s-1 Mpc-1) assuming ΩM=0.3 and ΩΛ=0.7. The other example models the time-delay doubles 1520+530, 1600+434, 1830-211, and 2149-275, which gives H0-1=14.5+3.3-1.5 Gyr (H0=67+8-13 km s-1 Mpc-1). Our second idea is to write the modeling software as a highly interactive Java applet, which can be used both for coarse-grained results inside a browser and for fine-grained results on a workstation. Several obstacles come up in trying to implement a numerically intensive method thus, but we overcome them.

[ascl:1305.005] PkdGRAV2: Parallel fast-multipole cosmological code

PkdGRAV2 is a high performance N-body treecode for self-gravitating astrophysical simulations. It is designed to run efficiently in serial and on a wide variety of parallel computers including both shared memory and message passing architectures. It can spatially adapt to large ranges in particle densities, and temporally adapt to large ranges in dynamical timescales. The code uses a non-standard data structure for efficiently calculating the gravitational forces, a variant on the k-D tree, and a novel method for treating periodic boundary conditions.

[ascl:1609.016] PKDGRAV3: Parallel gravity code

Pkdgrav3 is an 𝒪(N) gravity calculation method; it uses a binary tree algorithm with fifth order fast multipole expansion of the gravitational potential, using cell-cell interactions. Periodic boundaries conditions require very little data movement and allow a high degree of parallelism; the code includes GPU acceleration for all force calculations, leading to a significant speed-up with respect to previous versions (ascl:1305.005). Pkdgrav3 also has a sophisticated time-stepping criterion based on an estimation of the local dynamical time.

[ascl:1505.032] Planck Level-S: Planck Simulation Package

The Planck simulation package takes a cosmological model specified by the user and calculates a potential CMB sky consistent with this model, including astrophysical foregrounds, and then performs a simulated observation of this sky. This Simulation embraces many instrumental effects such as beam convolution and noise. Alternatively, the package can simulate the observation of a provided sky model, generated by another program such as the Planck Sky Model software. The Planck simulation package does not only provide Planck-like data, it can also be easily adopted to mimic the properties of other existing and upcoming CMB experiments.

[ascl:1607.005] Planetary3br: Three massive body resonance calculator

Given two planets P1 and P2 with arbitrary orbits, planetary3br calculates all possible semimajor axes that a third planet P0 can have in order for the system to be in a three body resonance; these are identified by the combination k0*P0 + k1*P1 + k2*P2. P1 and P2 are assumed to be not in an exact two-body resonance. The program also calculates three "strengths" of the resonance, one for each planet, which are only indicators of the dynamical relevance of the resonance on each planet. Sample input data are available along with the Fortran77 source code.

[ascl:1311.004] PlanetPack: Radial-velocity time-series analysis tool

PlanetPack facilitates and standardizes the advanced analysis of radial velocity (RV) data for the goal of exoplanets detection, characterization, and basic dynamical N-body simulations. PlanetPack is a command-line interpreter that can run either in an interactive mode or in a batch mode of automatic script interpretation.

[ascl:1506.003] PLATO Simulator: Realistic simulations of expected observations

PLATO Simulator is an end-to-end simulation software tool designed for the performance of realistic simulations of the expected observations of the PLATO mission but easily adaptable to similar types of missions. It models and simulates photometric time-series of CCD images by including models of the CCD and its electronics, the telescope optics, the stellar field, the jitter movements of the spacecraft, and all important natural noise sources.

[ascl:1106.003] PLplot: Cross-platform Software Package for Scientific Plots

PLplot is a cross-platform software package for creating scientific plots. To help accomplish that task it is organized as a core C library, language bindings for that library, and device drivers which control how the plots are presented in non-interactive and interactive plotting contexts. The PLplot core library can be used to create standard x-y plots, semi-log plots, log-log plots, contour plots, 3D surface plots, mesh plots, bar charts and pie charts. Multiple graphs (of the same or different sizes) may be placed on a single page, and multiple pages are allowed for those device formats that support them. PLplot has core support for Unicode. This means for our many Unicode-aware devices that plots can be labelled using the enormous selection of Unicode mathematical symbols. A large subset of our Unicode-aware devices also support complex text layout (CTL) languages such as Arabic, Hebrew, and Indic and Indic-derived CTL scripts such as Devanagari, Thai, Lao, and Tibetan. PLplot device drivers support a number of different file formats for non-interactive plotting and a number of different platforms that are suitable for interactive plotting. It is easy to add new device drivers to PLplot by writing a small number of device dependent routines.

[ascl:1206.007] Plumix: Generating mass segregated star clusters

Plumix is a small package for generating mass segregated star clusters. Its output can be directly used as input initial conditions for NBODY4 or NBODY6 code. Mass segregation stands as one of the most robust features of the dynamical evolution of self-gravitating star clusters. We formulate parametrized models of mass segregated star clusters in virial equilibrium. To this purpose we introduce mean inter-particle potentials for statistically described unsegregated systems and suggest a single-parameter generalization of its form which gives a mass-segregated state. Plumix is a numerical C-code generating the cluster according the algorithm given for construction of appropriate star cluster models. Their stability over several crossing-times is verified by following the evolution by means of direct N-body integration.

[ascl:1010.045] PLUTO: A Code for Flows in Multiple Spatial Dimensions

PLUTO is a modular Godunov-type code intended mainly for astrophysical applications and high Mach number flows in multiple spatial dimensions. The code embeds different hydrodynamic modules and multiple algorithms to solve the equations describing Newtonian, relativistic, MHD, or relativistic MHD fluids in Cartesian or curvilinear coordinates. PLUTO is entirely written in the C programming language and can run on either single processor machines or large parallel clusters through the MPI library. A simple user-interface based on the Python scripting language is available to setup a physical problem in a quick and self-explanatory way. Computations may be carried on either static or adaptive (structured) grids, the latter functionality being provided through the Chombo adaptive mesh refinement library.

[ascl:9909.001] PMCode: Particle-Mesh Code for Cosmological Simulations

Particle-Mesh (PM) codes are still very useful tools for testing predictions of cosmological models in cases when extra high resolution is not very important. We release for public use a cosmological PM N-body code. The code is very fast and simple. We provide a complete package of routines needed to set initial conditions, to run the code, and to analyze the results. The package allows you to simulate models with numerous combinations of parameters: open/flat/closed background, with or without the cosmological constant, different values of the Hubble constant, with or without hot neutrinos, tilted or non-tilted initial spectra, different amount of baryons.

[ascl:1102.008] PMFAST: Towards Optimal Parallel PM N-body Codes

The parallel PM N-body code PMFAST is cost-effective and memory-efficient. PMFAST is based on a two-level mesh gravity solver where the gravitational forces are separated into long and short range components. The decomposition scheme minimizes communication costs and allows tolerance for slow networks. The code approaches optimality in several dimensions. The force computations are local and exploit highly optimized vendor FFT libraries. It features minimal memory overhead, with the particle positions and velocities being the main cost. The code features support for distributed and shared memory parallelization through the use of MPI and OpenMP, respectively.

The current release version uses two grid levels on a slab decomposition, with periodic boundary conditions for cosmological applications. Open boundary conditions could be added with little computational overhead. Timing information and results from a recent cosmological production run of the code using a 3712^3 mesh with 6.4 x 10^9 particles are available.

[ascl:1102.015] PMFASTIC: Initial condition generator for PMFAST

PMFASTIC is a parallel initial condition generator, a slab decomposition Fortran 90 parallel cosmological initial condition generator for use with PMFAST. Files required for generating initial dark matter particle distributions and instructions are included, however one would require CMBFAST to create alternative transfer functions.

[ascl:1302.004] pNbody: A python parallelized N-body reduction toolbox

pNbody is a parallelized python module toolbox designed to manipulate and interactively display very large N-body systems. It allows the user to perform complicated manipulations with only very few commands and to load an N-body system and explore it interactively using the python interpreter. pNbody may also be used in python scripts. pNbody contains graphical facilities for creating maps of physical values of the system, such as density, temperature, and velocities maps. Stereo capabilities are also implemented. pNbody is not limited by file format; the user may use a parameter file to redefine how to read a preferred format.

[ascl:1408.005] POET: Planetary Orbital Evolution due to Tides

POET (Planetary Orbital Evolution due to Tides) calculates the orbital evolution of a system consisting of a single star with a single planet in orbit under the influence of tides. The following effects are The evolutions of the semimajor axis of the orbit due to the tidal dissipation in the star and the angular momentum of the stellar convective envelope by the tidal coupling are taken into account. In addition, the evolution includes the transfer of angular momentum between the stellar convective and radiative zones, effect of the stellar evolution on the tidal dissipation efficiency, and stellar core and envelope spins and loss of stellar convective zone angular momentum to a magnetically launched wind. POET can be used out of the box, and can also be extended and modified.

[ascl:1505.018] POKER: P Of K EstimatoR

POKER (P Of K EstimatoR) estimates the angular power spectrum of a 2D map or the cross-power spectrum of two 2D maps in the flat sky limit approximation in a realistic data context: steep power spectrum, non periodic boundary conditions, arbitrary pixel resolution, non trivial masks and observation patch geometry.

[ascl:1406.012] POLMAP: Interactive data analysis package for linear spectropolarimetry

POLMAP provides routines for displaying and analyzing spectropolarimetry data that are not available in the complementary TSP package. Commands are provided to read and write TSP (ascl:1406.011) polarization spectrum format files from within POLMAP. This code is distributed as part of the Starlink software collection (ascl:1110.012).

[ascl:1405.014] POLPACK: Imaging polarimetry reduction package

POLPACK maps the linear or circular polarization of extended astronomical objects, either in a single waveband, or in multiple wavebands (spectropolarimetry). Data from both single and dual beam polarimeters can be processed. It is part of the Starlink software collection (ascl:1110.012).

[ascl:1603.018] PolRadTran: Polarized Radiative Transfer Model Distribution

PolRadTran is a plane-parallel polarized radiative transfer model. It is used to compute the radiance exiting a vertically inhomogeneous atmosphere containing randomly-oriented particles. Both solar and thermal sources of radiation are considered. A direct method of incorporating the polarized scattering information is combined with the doubling and adding method to produce a relatively simple formulation.

[ascl:1109.005] PolSpice: Spatially Inhomogeneous Correlation Estimator for Temperature and Polarisation

PolSpice (aka Spice) is a tool to statistically analyze Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data, as well as any other diffuse data pixelized on the sphere.

This Fortran90 program measures the 2 point auto (or cross-) correlation functions w(θ) and the angular auto- (or cross-) power spectra C(l) from one or (two) sky map(s) of Stokes parameters (intensity I and linear polarisation Q and U). It is based on the fast Spherical Harmonic Transforms allowed by isolatitude pixelisations such as Healpix [for Npix pixels over the whole sky, and a C(l) computed up to l=lmax, PolSpice complexity scales like Npix1/2 lmax2 instead of Npix lmax2]. It corrects for the effects of the masks and can deal with inhomogeneous weights given to the pixels of the map. In the case of polarised data, the mixing of the E and B modes due to the cut sky and pixel weights can be corrected for to provide an unbiased estimate of the "magnetic" (B) component of the polarisation power spectrum. Most of the code is parallelized for shared memory (SMP) architecture using OpenMP.

[ascl:1502.011] PolyChord: Nested sampling for cosmology

PolyChord is a Bayesian inference tool for the simultaneous calculation of evidences and sampling of posterior distributions. It is a variation on John Skilling's Nested Sampling, utilizing Slice Sampling to generate new live points. It performs well on moderately high dimensional (~100s D) posterior distributions, and can cope with arbitrary degeneracies and multimodality.

[ascl:1602.018] POPPY: Physical Optics Propagation in PYthon

POPPY (Physical Optics Propagation in PYthon) simulates physical optical propagation including diffraction. It implements a flexible framework for modeling Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction and point spread function formation, particularly in the context of astronomical telescopes. POPPY provides the optical modeling framework for WebbPSF (ascl:1504.007) and was developed as part of a simulation package for JWST, but is available separately and is broadly applicable to many kinds of imaging simulations.

[ascl:0202.001] PopRatio: A program to calculate atomic level populations in astrophysical plasmas

PopRatio is a Fortran 90 code to calculate atomic level populations in astrophysical plasmas. The program solves the equations of statistical equilibrium considering all possible bound-bound processes: spontaneous, collisional or radiation induced (the later either directly or by fluorescence). There is no limit on the number of levels or in the number of processes that may be taken into account. The program may find a wide range of applicability in astronomical problems, such as interpreting fine-structure absorption lines or collisionally excited emission lines and also in calculating the cooling rates due to collisional excitation.

[ascl:1411.021] POSTMORTEM: Visibility data reduction and map making package

POSTMORTEM is the visibility data reduction and map making package from MRAO (Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory) and is used with the Ryle and CLFST telescopes at Cambridge. It contains sub-systems for nonitoring telescope performance, displaying and editing the visibility data, performing calibrations, removing flux from interfering bright sources, and map-making. It requires PGPLOT (ascl:1103.002), SLALIB (ascl:1403.025), and NAG numerical routines, all of which are distributed with the STARLINK software collection (ascl:1110.012) or available separately.

[ascl:1110.017] POWMES: Measuring the Power Spectrum in an N-body Simulation

POWMES is a F90 program to measure very accurately the power spectrum in a N-body simulation, using Taylor expansion of some order on the cosine and sine transforms. It can read GADGET format and requires FFTW2 to be installed.

[ascl:1401.009] PPF module for CAMB

The main CAMB code supports smooth dark energy models with constant equation of state and sound speed of one, or a quintessence model based on a potential. This modified code generalizes it to support a time-dependent equation of state w(a) that is allowed to cross the phantom divide, i.e. w=-1 multiple times by implementing a Parameterized Post-Friedmann(PPF) prescription for the dark energy perturbations.

[ascl:1507.009] PPInteractions: Secondary particle spectra from proton-proton interactions

PPInteractions generates the secondary particle energy spectra produced in proton-proton interactions over the entire chosen energy range for any value of the primary proton spectral index by adjusting the low energy part of the spectra (below 0.1TeV) to the high energy end of the spectra (above 0.1TeV). This code is based on the parametrization of Kelner et al (2006), in which the normalization of the low energy part of the spectra is given only for 3 values of the primary proton spectral indices (2, 2.5, 3).

[ascl:1210.002] pPXF: Penalized Pixel-Fitting stellar kinematics extraction

pPXF is an IDL (and free GDL or FL) program which extracts the stellar kinematics or stellar population from absorption-line spectra of galaxies using the Penalized Pixel-Fitting method (pPXF) developed by Cappellari & Emsellem (2004, PASP, 116, 138). Additional features implemented in the pPXF routine include:

  • Optimal template: Fitted together with the kinematics to minimize template-mismatch errors. Also useful to extract gas kinematics or derive emission-corrected line-strengths indexes. One can use synthetic templates to study the stellar population of galaxies via "Full Spectral Fitting" instead of using traditional line-strengths.
  • Regularization of templates weights: To reduce the noise in the recovery of the stellar population parameters and attach a physical meaning to the output weights assigned to the templates in term of the star formation history (SFH) or metallicity distribution of an individual galaxy.
  • Iterative sigma clipping: To clean the spectra from residual bad pixels or cosmic rays.
  • Additive/multiplicative polynomials: To correct low frequency continuum variations. Also useful for calibration purposes.

[ascl:1611.004] PRECESSION: Python toolbox for dynamics of spinning black-hole binaries

PRECESSION is a comprehensive toolbox for exploring the dynamics of precessing black-hole binaries in the post-Newtonian regime. It allows study of the evolution of the black-hole spins along their precession cycles, performs gravitational-wave-driven binary inspirals using both orbit-averaged and precession-averaged integrations, and predicts the properties of the merger remnant through fitting formulas obtained from numerical-relativity simulations. PRECESSION can add the black-hole spin dynamics to larger-scale numerical studies such as gravitational-wave parameter estimation codes, population synthesis models to predict gravitational-wave event rates, galaxy merger trees and cosmological simulations of structure formation, and provides fast and reliable integration methods to propagate statistical samples of black-hole binaries from/to large separations where they form to/from small separations where they become detectable, thus linking gravitational-wave observations of spinning black-hole binaries to their astrophysical formation history. The code is also useful for computing initial parameters for numerical-relativity simulations targeting specific precessing systems.

[ascl:1112.016] PREDICT: Satellite tracking and orbital prediction

PREDICT is an open-source, multi-user satellite tracking and orbital prediction program written under the Linux operating system. PREDICT provides real-time satellite tracking and orbital prediction information to users and client applications through:

  • the system console
  • the command line
  • a network socket
  • the generation of audio speech
Data such as a spacecraft's sub-satellite point, azimuth and elevation headings, Doppler shift, path loss, slant range, orbital altitude, orbital velocity, footprint diameter, orbital phase (mean anomaly), squint angle, eclipse depth, the time and date of the next AOS (or LOS of the current pass), orbit number, and sunlight and visibility information are provided on a real-time basis. PREDICT can also track (or predict the position of) the Sun and Moon. PREDICT has the ability to control AZ/EL antenna rotators to maintain accurate orientation in the direction of communication satellites. As an aid in locating and tracking satellites through optical means, PREDICT can articulate tracking coordinates and visibility information as plain speech.

[ascl:1305.006] Pressure-Entropy SPH: Pressure-entropy smooth-particle hydrodynamics

Pressure-Entropy SPH, a modified version of GADGET-2, uses the Lagrangian “Pressure-Entropy” formulation of the SPH equations. This removes the spurious “surface tension” force substantially improving the treatment of fluid mixing and contact discontinuities. Pressure-Entropy SPH shows good performance in mixing experiments (e.g. Kelvin-Helmholtz & blob tests), with conservation maintained even in strong shock/blastwave tests, where formulations without manifest conservation produce large errors. This improves the treatment of sub-sonic turbulence and lessens the need for large kernel particle numbers.

[ascl:1107.017] PRESTO: PulsaR Exploration and Search TOolkit

PRESTO is a large suite of pulsar search and analysis software. It was primarily designed to efficiently search for binary millisecond pulsars from long observations of globular clusters (although it has since been used in several surveys with short integrations and to process a lot of X-ray data as well). To date, PRESTO has discovered well over a hundred and fifty pulsars, including approximately 100 recycled pulsars, about 80 of which are in binaries. It is written primarily in ANSI C, with many of the recent routines in Python.

Written with portability, ease-of-use, and memory efficiency in mind, it can currently handle raw data from the following pulsar machines or formats:

  • PSRFITS search-format data (as from GUPPI at the GBT and the Mock Spectrometers at Arecibo)
  • SPIGOT at the GBT
  • Most Wideband Arecibo Pulsar Processor (WAPP) at Arecibo
  • The Parkes and Jodrell Bank 1-bit filterbank formats
  • Berkeley-Caltech Pulsar Machine (BCPM) at the GBT (may it RIP...)
  • 8-bit filterbank format from SIGPROC (other formats will be added if required)
  • A time series composed of single precision (i.e. 4-byte) floating point data
  • Photon arrival times (or events) in ASCII or double-precision binary formats

[ascl:1601.020] ProC: Process Coordinator

ProC (short for Process Coordinator) is a versatile workflow engine that allows the user to build, run and manage workflows with just a few clicks. It automatically documents every processing step, making every modification to data reproducible. ProC provides a graphical user interface for constructing complex data processing workflows out of a given set of computer programs. The user can, for example, specify that only data products which are affected by a change in the input data are updated selectively, avoiding unnecessary computations. The ProC suite is flexible and satisfies basic needs of data processing centers that have to be able to restructure their data processing along with the development of a project.

[ascl:1608.011] PROFFIT: Analysis of X-ray surface-brightness profiles

PROFFIT analyzes X-ray surface-brightness profiles for data from any X-ray instrument. It can extract surface-brightness profiles in circular or elliptical annuli, using constant or logarithmic bin size, from the image centroid, the surface-brightness peak, or any user-given center, and provides surface-brightness profiles in any circular or elliptical sectors. It offers background map support to extract background profiles, can excise areas using SAO DS9-compatible (ascl:0003.002) region files to exclude point sources, provides fitting with a number of built-in models, including the popular beta model, double beta, cusp beta, power law, and projected broken power law, uses chi-squared or C statistic, and can fit on the surface-brightness or counts data. It has a command-line interface similar to HEASOFT’s XSPEC (ascl:9910.005) package, provides interactive help with a description of all the commands, and results can be saved in FITS, ROOT or TXT format.

[ascl:1705.010] PROFILER: 1D galaxy light profile decomposition

Written in Python, PROFILER analyzes the radial surface brightness profiles of galaxies. It accurately models a wide range of galaxies and galaxy components, such as elliptical galaxies, the bulges of spiral and lenticular galaxies, nuclear sources, discs, bars, rings, and spiral arms with a variety of parametric functions routinely employed in the field (Sérsic, core-Sérsic, exponential, Gaussian, Moffat and Ferrers). In addition, Profiler can employ the broken exponential model (relevant for disc truncations or antitruncations) and two special cases of the edge-on disc model: namely along the major axis (in the disc plane) and along the minor axis (perpendicular to the disc plane).

[ascl:1612.004] ProFit: Bayesian galaxy fitting tool

ProFit is a Bayesian galaxy fitting tool that uses the fast C++ image generation library libprofit (ascl:1612.003) and a flexible R interface to a large number of likelihood samplers. It offers a fully featured Bayesian interface to galaxy model fitting (also called profiling), using mostly the same standard inputs as other popular codes (e.g. GALFIT ascl:1104.010), but it is also able to use complex priors and a number of likelihoods.

[ascl:1204.015] PROFIT: Emission-line PROfile FITting routine

The PROFIT is an IDL routine to do automated fitting of emission-line profiles by Gaussian curves or Gauss-Hermite series optimized for use in Integral Field and Fabry-Perot data cubes. As output PROFIT gives two-dimensional FITS files for the emission-line flux distribution, centroid velocity, velocity dispersion and higher order Gauss-Hermite moments (h3 and h4).

[ascl:1306.004] PROM4: 1D isothermal and isobaric modeler for solar prominences

PROM4 computes simple models of solar prominences which consist of plane-parallel slabs standing vertically above the solar surface. Each model is defined by 5 parameters: temperature, density, geometrical thickness, microturbulent velocity and height above the solar surface. PROM4 solves the equations of radiative transfer, statistical equilibrium, ionization and pressure equilibria, and computes electron and hydrogen level populations and hydrogen line profiles. Written in Fortran 90 and with two versions available (one with text in English, one with text in French), the code needs 64-bit arithmetic for real numbers.

[ascl:1511.023] PromptNuFlux: Prompt atmospheric neutrino flux calculator

PromptNuFlux computes the prompt atmospheric neutrino flux E3Φ(GeV2/(cm2ssr)), including the total associated theory uncertainty, for a range of energies between E=103 GeV and E=107.5 GeV. Results are available for five different parametrizations of the input cosmic ray flux: BPL, H3P, H3A, H14a, H14b.

[ascl:1405.006] PROPER: Optical propagation routines

PROPER simulates the propagation of light through an optical system using Fourier transform algorithms (Fresnel, angular spectrum methods). Distributed as IDL source code, it includes routines to create complex apertures, aberrated wavefronts, and deformable mirrors. It is especially useful for the simulation of high contrast imaging telescopes (extrasolar planet imagers like TPF).

[ascl:1306.005] PROS: Multi-mission X-ray analysis software system

PROS is a multi-mission x-ray analysis software system designed to run under IRAF. The PROS software includes spatial, spectral, timing, data I/O and conversion routines, plotting applications, and general algorithms for performing arithmetic operations with imaging data.

[ascl:1301.001] PSFEx: Point Spread Function Extractor

PSFEx (“PSF Extractor”) extracts models of the Point Spread Function (PSF) from FITS images processed with SExtractor and measures the quality of images. The generated PSF models can be used for model-fitting photometry or morphological analyses.

[ascl:1208.005] PSM: Planck Sky Model

The Planck Sky Model (PSM) is a global representation of the multi-component sky at frequencies ranging from a few GHz to a few THz. It summarizes in a synthetic way as much of our present knowledge as possible of the GHz sky. PSM is a complete and versatile set of programs and data that can be used for the simulation or the prediction of sky emission in the frequency range of typical CMB experiments, and in particular of the Planck sky mission. It was originally developed as part of the activities of Planck component separation Working Group (or "Working Group 2" - WG2), and of the ADAMIS team at APC.

PSM gives users the opportunity to investigate the model in some depth: look at its parameters, visualize its predictions for all individual components in various formats, simulate sky emission compatible with a given parameter set, and observe the modeled sky with a synthetic instrument. In particular, it makes possible the simulation of sky emission maps as could be plausibly observed by Planck or other CMB experiments that can be used as inputs for the development and testing of data processing and analysis techniques.

[ascl:1705.013] PSOAP: Precision Spectroscopic Orbits A-Parametrically

PSOAP (Precision Spectroscopic Orbits A-Parametrically) uses Gaussian processes to infer component spectra of single-lined and double-lined spectroscopic binaries, while simultaneously exploring the posteriors of the orbital parameters and the spectra themselves. PSOAP accounts for the natural λ-covariances in each spectrum, thus providing a natural "de-noising" of the spectra typically offered by Fourier techniques.

[ascl:1010.011] PSpectRe: A Pseudo-Spectral Code for (P)reheating

PSpectRe, written in C++, uses Fourier-space pseudo-spectral methods to evolve interacting scalar fields in an expanding universe. The code is optimized for the analysis of parametric resonance in the post-inflationary universe and provides an alternative to finite differencing codes. PSpectRe has both second- (Velocity-Verlet) and fourth-order (Runge-Kutta) time integrators. In some circumstances PSpectRe obtains reliable results while using substantially fewer points than a finite differencing code by computing the post-resonance equation of state. PSpectRe is designed to be easily extended to other problems in early-universe cosmology, including the generation of gravitational waves during phase transitions and pre-inflationary bubble collisions.

[ascl:1105.014] PSRCHIVE: Development Library for the Analysis of Pulsar Astronomical Data

PSRCHIVE is an Open Source C++ development library for the analysis of pulsar astronomical data. It implements an extensive range of algorithms for use in pulsar timing, polarimetric calibration, single-pulse analyses, RFI mitigation, scintillation studies, etc. These tools are utilized by a powerful suite of user-end programs that come with the library.

[ascl:1107.019] PSRPOP: Pulsar Population Modelling Programs

PSRPOP is a package developed to model the Galactic population and evolution of radio pulsars. It is a collection of modules written in Fortran77 for an analysis of a large sample of pulsars detected by the Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey. The main programs are:

  • populate - creates a model Galaxy of pulsars distributed according according to various assumptions
  • survey - searches the model galaxies generated using populate using realistic models of pulsar surveys
  • visualize - a Tk/PGPLOT script to plot various aspects of model detected pulsars from survey
A sample screenshot from visualize can be found here.

[ascl:1501.006] PsrPopPy: Pulsar Population Modelling Programs in Python

PsrPopPy is a Python implementation of the Galactic population and evolution of radio pulsars modelling code PSRPOP.

[ascl:1606.013] Pulse Portraiture: Pulsar timing

Pulse Portraiture is a wideband pulsar timing code written in python. It uses an extension of the FFTFIT algorithm (Taylor 1992) to simultaneously measure a phase (TOA) and dispersion measure (DM). The code includes a Gaussian-component-based portrait modeling routine. The code uses the python interface to the pulsar data analysis package PSRCHIVE (ascl:1105.014) and also requires the non-linear least-squares minimization package lmfit (ascl:1606.014).

[ascl:1110.014] pureS2HAT: S 2HAT-based Pure E/B Harmonic Transforms

The pS2HAT routines allow efficient, parallel calculation of the so-called 'pure' polarized multipoles. The computed multipole coefficients are equal to the standard pseudo-multipoles calculated for the apodized sky maps of the Stokes parameters Q and U subsequently corrected by so-called counterterms. If the applied apodizations fullfill certain boundary conditions, these multipoles correspond to the pure multipoles. Pure multipoles of one type, i.e., either E or B, are ensured not to contain contributions from the other one, at least to within numerical artifacts. They can be therefore further used in the estimation of the sky power spectra via the pseudo power spectrum technique, which has to however correctly account for the applied apodization on the one hand, and the presence of the counterterms, on the other.

In addition, the package contains the routines permitting calculation of the spin-weighted apodizations, given an input scalar, i.e., spin-0 window. The former are needed to compute the counterterms. It also provides routines for maps and window manipulations. The routines are written in C and based on the S2HAT library, which is used to perform all required spherical harmonic transforms as well as all inter-processor communication. They are therefore parallelized using MPI and follow the distributed-memory computational model. The data distribution patterns, pixelization choices, conventions etc are all as those assumed/allowed by the S2HAT library.

[ascl:1307.019] PURIFY: Tools for radio-interferometric imaging

PURIFY is a collection of routines written in C that implements different tools for radio-interferometric imaging including file handling (for both visibilities and fits files), implementation of the measurement operator and set-up of the different optimization problems used for image deconvolution. The code calls the generic Sparse OPTimization (SOPT) package to solve the imaging optimization problems.

[ascl:1608.010] pvextractor: Position-Velocity Diagram Extractor

Given a path defined in sky coordinates and a spectral cube, pvextractor extracts a slice of the cube along that path and along the spectral axis to produce a position-velocity or position-frequency slice. The path can be defined programmatically in pixel or world coordinates, and can also be drawn interactively using a simple GUI. Pvextractor is the main function, but also includes a few utilities related to header trimming and parsing.

[ascl:1210.026] PVS-GRMHD: Conservative GRMHD Primitive Variable Solvers

Conservative numerical schemes for general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (GRMHD) require a method for transforming between "conserved'' variables such as momentum and energy density and "primitive" variables such as rest-mass density, internal energy, and components of the four-velocity. The forward transformation (primitive to conserved) has a closed-form solution, but the inverse transformation (conserved to primitive) requires the solution of a set of five nonlinear equations. This code performs the inversion.

[ascl:1704.001] pwkit: Astronomical utilities in Python

pwkit is a collection of miscellaneous astronomical utilities in Python, with an emphasis on radio astronomy, reading and writing various data formats, and convenient command-line utilities. Utilities include basic astronomical calculations, data visualization tools such as mapping arbitrary data to color scales and tracing contours, and data input and output utilities such as streaming output from other programs.

[ascl:1707.003] pyaneti: Multi-planet radial velocity and transit fitting

Pyaneti is a multi-planet radial velocity and transit fit software. The code uses Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods with a Bayesian approach and a parallelized ensemble sampler algorithm in Fortran which makes the code fast. It creates posteriors, correlations, and ready-to-publish plots automatically, and handles circular and eccentric orbits. It is capable of multi-planet fitting and handles stellar limb darkening, systemic velocities for multiple instruments, and short and long cadence data, and offers additional capabilities.

[ascl:1502.007] PyBDSF: Python Blob Detection and Source Finder

PyBDSF (Python Blob Detector and Source Finder, formerly PyBDSM) decomposes radio interferometry images into sources and makes their properties available for further use. PyBDSF can decompose an image into a set of Gaussians, shapelets, or wavelets as well as calculate spectral indices and polarization properties of sources and measure the psf variation across an image. PyBDSF uses an interactive environment based on CASA (ascl:1107.013); PyBDSF may also be used in Python scripts.

[ascl:1204.002] pyBLoCXS: Bayesian Low-Count X-ray Spectral analysis

pyBLoCXS is a sophisticated Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) based algorithm designed to carry out Bayesian Low-Count X-ray Spectral (BLoCXS) analysis in the Sherpa environment. The code is a Python extension to Sherpa that explores parameter space at a suspected minimum using a predefined Sherpa model to high-energy X-ray spectral data. pyBLoCXS includes a flexible definition of priors and allows for variations in the calibration information. It can be used to compute posterior predictive p-values for the likelihood ratio test. The pyBLoCXS code has been tested with a number of simple single-component spectral models; it should be used with great care in more complex settings.

[ascl:1304.020] pyCloudy: Tools to manage astronomical Cloudy photoionization code

PyCloudy is a Python library that handles input and output files of the Cloudy photoionization code (Gary Ferland). It can also generate 3D nebula from various runs of the 1D Cloudy code. pyCloudy allows you to:

  • define and write input file(s) for Cloudy code. As you can have it in a code, you may generate automatically sets of input files, changing parameters from one to the other.
  • read the Cloudy output files and play with the data: you will be able to plot line emissivity ratio vs. the radius of the nebula, the electron temperature, or any Cloudy output.
  • build pseudo-3D models, a la Cloudy_3D, by running a set of models, changing parameters (e.g. inner radius, density) following angular laws, reading the outputs of the set of models and interpolating the results (Te, ne, line emissivities) in a 3D cube.

[ascl:1509.007] pycola: N-body COLA method code

pycola is a multithreaded Python/Cython N-body code, implementing the Comoving Lagrangian Acceleration (COLA) method in the temporal and spatial domains, which trades accuracy at small-scales to gain computational speed without sacrificing accuracy at large scales. This is especially useful for cheaply generating large ensembles of accurate mock halo catalogs required to study galaxy clustering and weak lensing. The COLA method achieves its speed by calculating the large-scale dynamics exactly using LPT while letting the N-body code solve for the small scales, without requiring it to capture exactly the internal dynamics of halos.

[ascl:1311.002] PyCOOL: Cosmological Object-Oriented Lattice code

PyCOOL is a Python + CUDA program that solves the evolution of interacting scalar fields in an expanding universe. PyCOOL uses modern GPUs to solve this evolution and to make the computation much faster. The code includes numerous post-processing functions that provide useful information about the cosmological model, including various spectra and statistics of the fields.

[ascl:1210.027] PyCosmic: Detecting cosmics in CALIFA and other fiber-fed integral-field spectroscopy datasets

The detection of cosmic ray hits (cosmics) in fiber-fed integral-field spectroscopy (IFS) data of single exposures is a challenging task because of the complex signal recorded by IFS instruments. Existing detection algorithms are commonly found to be unreliable in the case of IFS data, and the optimal parameter settings are usually unknown a priori for a given dataset. The Calar Alto legacy integral field area (CALIFA) survey generates hundreds of IFS datasets for which a reliable and robust detection algorithm for cosmics is required as an important part of the fully automatic CALIFA data reduction pipeline. PyCosmic combines the edge-detection algorithm of L.A.Cosmic with a point-spread function convolution scheme. PyCosmic is the only algorithm that achieves an acceptable detection performance for CALIFA data. Only for strongly undersampled IFS data does L.A.Cosmic exceed the performance of PyCosmic by a few percent. Thus, PyCosmic appears to be the most versatile cosmics detection algorithm for IFS data.

[ascl:1509.010] PyCS : Python Curve Shifting

PyCS is a software toolbox to estimate time delays between multiple images of strongly lensed quasars, from resolved light curves such as obtained by the COSMOGRAIL monitoring program. The pycs package defines a collection of classes and high level functions, that you can script in a flexible way. PyCS makes it easy to compare different point estimators (including your own) without much code integration. The package heavily depends on numpy, scipy, and matplotlib.

[ascl:1401.005] PyDrizzle: Python version of Drizzle

PyDrizzle provides a semi-automated interface for computing the parameters necessary for running Drizzle. PyDrizzle performs the task of determining the parameters necessary for aligning images based on the WCS information in the input image headers, as well as any supplemental alignment information provided in shift files, and combines the images onto the same WCS. Though it does not identify cosmic rays, it has the ability to ignore pixels flagged as bad, such as pixels identified by other programs as affected by cosmic rays.

[ascl:1112.014] PyEphem: Astronomical Ephemeris for Python

PyEphem provides scientific-grade astronomical computations for the Python programming language. Given a date and location on the Earth’s surface, it can compute the positions of the Sun and Moon, of the planets and their moons, and of any asteroids, comets, or earth satellites whose orbital elements the user can provide. Additional functions are provided to compute the angular separation between two objects in the sky, to determine the constellation in which an object lies, and to find the times at which an object rises, transits, and sets on a particular day.

The numerical routines that lie behind PyEphem are those from the wonderful XEphem astronomy application, whose author, Elwood Downey, generously gave permission for us to use them as the basis for PyEphem.

[ascl:1609.025] PYESSENCE: Generalized Coupled Quintessence Linear Perturbation Python Code

PYESSENCE evolves linearly perturbed coupled quintessence models with multiple (cold dark matter) CDM fluid species and multiple DE (dark energy) scalar fields, and can be used to generate quantities such as the growth factor of large scale structure for any coupled quintessence model with an arbitrary number of fields and fluids and arbitrary couplings.

[ascl:1403.002] pyExtinction: Atmospheric extinction

The Python script/package pyExtinction computes and plots total atmospheric extinction from decomposition into physical components (Rayleigh attenuation, ozone absorption, aerosol extinction). Its default extinction parameters are adapted to mean Mauna Kea summit conditions.

[ascl:1207.009] PyFITS: Python FITS Module

PyFITS provides an interface to FITS formatted files in the Python scripting language and PyRAF, the Python-based interface to IRAF. It is useful both for interactive data analysis and for writing analysis scripts in Python using FITS files as either input or output. PyFITS is a development project of the Science Software Branch at the Space Telescope Science Institute.

[ascl:1103.012] Pyflation: Second Order Perturbations During Inflation Beyond Slow-roll

Pyflation is a Python package for calculating cosmological perturbations during an inflationary expansion of the universe. The modules in the pyflation Python package can be used to run simulations of different scalar field models of the early universe. The main classes are contained in the cosmomodels module and include simulations of background fields and first order and second order perturbations. The sourceterm package contains modules required for the computation of the term required for the evolution of second order perturbations.

Alongside the Python package, the bin directory contains Python scripts which can run first and second order simulations. A helper script called pyflation-qsubstart.py sets up a full second order run (including background, first order and source calculations) to be used on queueing system which contains the qsub executable (e.g. a Rocks cluster).

[submitted] pygad: Analysing Gadget Simulations with Python

pygad provides a framework for dealing with Gadget snapshots. The code reads any of the many different Gadget (ascl:0003.001) formats, allows easy masking snapshots to particles of interest, decorates the data blocks with units, allows to add automatically updating derived blocks, and provides several binning and plotting routines, among other tasks, to provide convenient, intuitive handling of the Gadget data without the need to worry about technical details. pygad provides access to single stellar population (SSP) models, has an interface to Rockstar (ascl:1210.008) output files, provides its own friends-of-friends (FoF) finder, calculates spherical overdensities, and has a sub-module to generate mock absorption lines.

[ascl:1411.001] pyGadgetReader: GADGET snapshot reader for python

pyGadgetReader is a universal GADGET snapshot reader for python that supports type-1, type-2, HDF5, and TIPSY (ascl:1111.015) binary formats. It additionally supports reading binary outputs from FoF_Special, P-StarGroupFinder, Rockstar (ascl:1210.008), and Rockstar-Galaxies.

[ascl:1402.021] PyGFit: Python Galaxy Fitter

PyGFit measures PSF-matched photometry from images with disparate pixel scales and PSF sizes; its primary purpose is to extract robust spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from crowded images. It fits blended sources in crowded, low resolution images with models generated from a higher resolution image, thus minimizing the impact of crowding and also yielding consistently measured fluxes in different filters which minimizes systematic uncertainty in the final SEDs.

[ascl:1611.013] pyGMMis: Mixtures-of-Gaussians density estimation method

pyGMMis is a mixtures-of-Gaussians density estimation method that accounts for arbitrary incompleteness in the process that creates the samples as long as the incompleteness is known over the entire feature space and does not depend on the sample density (missing at random). pyGMMis uses the Expectation-Maximization procedure and generates its best guess of the unobserved samples on the fly. It can also incorporate an uniform "background" distribution as well as independent multivariate normal measurement errors for each of the observed samples, and then recovers an estimate of the error-free distribution from which both observed and unobserved samples are drawn. The code automatically segments the data into localized neighborhoods, and is capable of performing density estimation with millions of samples and thousands of model components on machines with sufficient memory.

[ascl:1603.013] PyGSM: Python interface to the Global Sky Model

PyGSM is a Python interface for the Global Sky Model (GSM, ascl:1011.010). The GSM is a model of diffuse galactic radio emission, constructed from a variety of all-sky surveys spanning the radio band (e.g. Haslam and WMAP). PyGSM uses the GSM to generate all-sky maps in Healpix format of diffuse Galactic radio emission from 10 MHz to 94 GHz. The PyGSM module provides visualization utilities, file output in FITS format, and the ability to generate observed skies for a given location and date. PyGSM requires Healpy, PyEphem (ascl:1112.014), and AstroPy (ascl:1304.002).

[ascl:1511.005] pyhrs: Spectroscopic data reduction package for SALT

The pyhrs package reduces data from the High Resolution Spectrograph (HRS) on the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT). HRS is a dual-beam, fiber fed echelle spectrectrograph with four modes of operation: low (R~16000), medium (R~34000), high (R~65000), and high stability (R~65000). pyhrs, written in Python, includes all of the steps necessary to reduce HRS low, medium, and high resolution data; this includes basic CCD reductions, order identification, wavelength calibration, and extraction of the spectra.

[ascl:1208.004] PyKE: Reduction and analysis of Kepler Simple Aperture Photometry data

PyKE is a python-based PyRAF package that can also be run as a stand-alone program within a unix-based shell without compiling against PyRAF. It is a group of tasks developed for the reduction and analysis of Kepler Simple Aperture Photometry (SAP) data of individual targets with individual characteristics. The main purposes of these tasks are to i) re-extract light curves from manually-chosen pixel apertures and ii) cotrend and/or detrend the data in order to reduce or remove systematic noise structure using methods tunable to user and target-specific requirements. PyKE is an open source project and contributions of new tasks or enhanced functionality of existing tasks by the community are welcome.

[ascl:1506.001] pyKLIP: PSF Subtraction for Exoplanets and Disks

pyKLIP subtracts out the stellar PSF to search for directly-imaged exoplanets and disks using a Python implementation of the Karhunen-Loève Image Projection (KLIP) algorithm. pyKLIP supports ADI, SDI, and ADI+SDI to model the stellar PSF and offers a large array of PSF subtraction parameters to optimize the reduction. pyKLIP relies on a minimal amount of dependencies (numpy, scipy, and astropy) and parallelizes the KLIP algorithm to speed up the reduction. pyKLIP supports GPI and P1640 data and can interface with other data sources with the addition of new modules. It also can inject simulated planets and disks as well as automatically search for point sources in PSF-subtracted data.

[ascl:1708.016] pyLCSIM: X-ray lightcurves simulator

pyLCSIM simulates X-ray lightcurves from coherent signals and power spectrum models. Coherent signals can be specified as a sum of one or more sinusoids, each with its frequency, pulsed fraction and phase shift; or as a series of harmonics of a fundamental frequency (each with its pulsed fraction and phase shift). Power spectra can be simulated from a model of the power spectrum density (PSD) using as a template one or more of the built-in library functions. The user can also define his/her custom models. Models are additive.

[ascl:1510.003] PyLDTk: Python toolkit for calculating stellar limb darkening profiles and model-specific coefficients for arbitrary filters

PyLDTk automates the calculation of custom stellar limb darkening (LD) profiles and model-specific limb darkening coefficients (LDC) using the library of PHOENIX-generated specific intensity spectra by Husser et al. (2013). It facilitates exoplanet transit light curve modeling, especially transmission spectroscopy where the modeling is carried out for custom narrow passbands. PyLDTk construct model-specific priors on the limb darkening coefficients prior to the transit light curve modeling. It can also be directly integrated into the log posterior computation of any pre-existing transit modeling code with minimal modifications to constrain the LD model parameter space directly by the LD profile, allowing for the marginalization over the whole parameter space that can explain the profile without the need to approximate this constraint by a prior distribution. This is useful when using a high-order limb darkening model where the coefficients are often correlated, and the priors estimated from the tabulated values usually fail to include these correlations.

[ascl:1612.018] pylightcurve: Exoplanet lightcurve model

pylightcurve is a model for light-curves of transiting planets. It uses the four coefficients law for the stellar limb darkening and returns the relative flux, F(t), as a function of the limb darkening coefficients, an, the Rp/R* ratio and all the orbital parameters based on the nonlinear limb darkening model (Claret 2000).

[submitted] pyLIMA: An Open Source Package for Microlensing Modeling

pyLIMA is an open source software for microlensing modeling. Based on Python, the goal is to offer to users an efficient and user friendly package to analyze their data. The code is written and tested with professional standards, such as PEP8 or unit testing.

[ascl:1506.005] PyMC: Bayesian Stochastic Modelling in Python

PyMC is a python module that implements Bayesian statistical models and fitting algorithms, including Markov chain Monte Carlo. Its flexibility and extensibility make it applicable to a large suite of problems. Along with core sampling functionality, PyMC includes methods for summarizing output, plotting, goodness-of-fit and convergence diagnostics.

[ascl:1610.016] PyMC3: Python probabilistic programming framework

PyMC3 performs Bayesian statistical modeling and model fitting focused on advanced Markov chain Monte Carlo and variational fitting algorithms. It offers powerful sampling algorithms, such as the No U-Turn Sampler, allowing complex models with thousands of parameters with little specialized knowledge of fitting algorithms, intuitive model specification syntax, and optimization for finding the maximum a posteriori (MAP) point. PyMC3 uses Theano to compute gradients via automatic differentiation as well as compile probabilistic programs on-the-fly to C for increased speed.

[ascl:1505.025] pyMCZ: Oxygen abundances calculations and uncertainties from strong-line flux measurements

pyMCZ calculates metallicity according to a number of strong line metallicity diagnostics from spectroscopy line measurements and obtain uncertainties from the line flux errors in a Monte Carlo framework. Given line flux measurements and their uncertainties, pyMCZ produces synthetic distributions for the oxygen abundance in up to 13 metallicity scales simultaneously, as well as for E(B-V), and estimates their median values and their 68% confidence regions. The code can output the full MC distributions and their kernel density estimates.

[ascl:1411.011] PyMGC3: Finding stellar streams in the Galactic Halo using a family of Great Circle Cell counts methods

PyMGC3 is a Python toolkit to apply the Modified Great Circle Cell Counts (mGC3) method to search for tidal streams in the Galactic Halo. The code computes pole count maps using the full mGC3/nGC3/GC3 family of methods. The original GC3 method (Johnston et al., 1996) uses positional information to search for 'great-circle-cell structures'; mGC3 makes use of full 6D data and nGC3 uses positional and proper motion data.

[ascl:1401.003] PyMidas: Interface from Python to Midas

PyMidas is an interface between Python and MIDAS, the major ESO legacy general purpose data processing system. PyMidas allows a user to exploit both the rich legacy of MIDAS software and the power of Python scripting in a unified interactive environment. PyMidas also allows the usage of other Python-based astronomical analysis systems such as PyRAF.

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