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Results 101-200 of 3554 (3462 ASCL, 92 submitted)

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[ascl:1502.017] AMIsurvey: Calibration and imaging pipeline for radio data

AMIsurvey is a fully automated calibration and imaging pipeline for data from the AMI-LA radio observatory; it has two key dependencies. The first is drive-ami, included in this entry. Drive-ami is a Python interface to the specialized AMI-REDUCE calibration pipeline, which applies path delay corrections, automatic flags for interference, pointing errors, shadowing and hardware faults, applies phase and amplitude calibrations, Fourier transforms the data into the frequency domain, and writes out the resulting data in uvFITS format. The second is chimenea, which implements an automated imaging algorithm to convert the calibrated uvFITS into science-ready image maps. AMIsurvey links the calibration and imaging stages implemented within these packages together, configures the chimenea algorithm with parameters appropriate to data from AMI-LA, and provides a command-line interface.

[ascl:2108.013] AMOEBA: Automated Gaussian decomposition

AMOEBA (Automated Molecular Excitation Bayesian line-fitting Algorithm) employs a Bayesian approach to Gaussian decomposition, resulting in an objective and statistically robust identification of individual clouds along the line-of-sight. It uses the Python implementation of Goodman & Weare's Affine Invariant Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) Ensemble sampler emcee (ascl:1303.002) to sample the posterior probability distribution and numerically evaluate the integrals required to compute the Bayes Factor. Amoeba takes as input a set of OH optical depth spectra and a set of expected brightness temperature spectra that are obtained by measuring the brightness temperature towards the bright background continuum source (the "on-source" observations), and in a pattern surrounding the continuum source (the "off-source" observations). Amoeba can also take as input a set of OH optical depth spectra only, and also allows input of an arbitrary number of spectra to be fit simultaneously.

[ascl:2005.015] AMPEL: Alert Management, Photometry, and Evaluation of Light curves

AMPEL provides an analysis framework for high-throughput surveys and is suited for streamed data. The package combines the functionality of an alert broker with a generic framework capable of hosting user-contributed code; it encourages provenance and keeps track of the varying information states that a transient displays. The latter concept includes information gathered over time and data policies such as access or calibration levels.

[ascl:2307.032] AmpF: Amplification factor for solar lensing

AmpF numerically calculates the amplification factor for solar lensing. The import parameters are the gravitational-wave frequency and the source angular position with respect to the solar center; the code outputs are the amplification factor and its geometrical-optics limit. AmpF accepts variables for several attributes and the overall amplitude of the lensing potential can be changed as needed. The method has been implemented in both C and Python.

[ascl:1107.007] AMUSE: Astrophysical Multipurpose Software Environment

AMUSE is an open source software framework for large-scale simulations in astrophysics, in which existing codes for gravitational dynamics, stellar evolution, hydrodynamics and radiative transport can be easily coupled and placed in the appropriate observational context.

[ascl:1708.028] ANA: Astrophysical Neutrino Anisotropy

ANA calculates the likelihood function for a model comprised of two components to the astrophysical neutrino flux detected by IceCube. The first component is extragalactic. Since point sources have not been found and there is increasing evidence that one source catalog cannot describe the entire data set, ANA models the extragalactic flux as isotropic. The second component is galactic. A variety of catalogs of interest are also provided. ANA takes the galactic contribution to be proportional to the matter density of the universe. The likelihood function has one free parameter fgal that is the fraction of the astrophysical flux that is galactic. ANA finds the best fit value of fgal and scans over 0<fgal<1.

[ascl:1402.019] ANAigm: Analytic model for attenuation by the intergalactic medium

ANAigm offers an updated version of the Madau model for the attenuation by the intergalactic neutral hydrogen against the radiation from distant objects. This new model is written in Fortran90 and predicts, for some redshifts, more than 0.5--1 mag different attenuation magnitudes through usual broad-band filters relative to the original Madau model.

[ascl:1908.015] Analysator: Quantitative analysis of Vlasiator files

Analysator analyzes vlsv files produced by Vlasiator (ascl:1908.014). The code facilitates studies of particle paths, pitch angle distributions, velocity distributions, and more. It can read and write VLSV files and do calculations with the data, plot the real space from VLSV files with Mayavi (ascl:1205.008), and plot the velocity space (both blocks and iso surface) from VLSV files. It can also take cut-throughs, pitch angle distributions, gyrophase angle, and 3d slices, plot variables with sub plots in a clean format, and fit 1D polynomials to data.

[ascl:2207.030] Analysis of dipole alignment in large-scale distribution of galaxy spin directions

This code analyzes a dipole axis in the distribution of galaxy spin directions. The code takes as input a list of galaxies, their equatorial coordinates, and their spin directions. It then determines the statistical significance of possible dipole axis at any point in the sky by comparing the cosine dependence of the spin directions to the mean and standard deviation of the cosine dependence after 2000 runs with random spin directions. A code to analyze the binomial distribution of the spin directions using Monte Carlo simulation is also available.

[ascl:1110.001] analytic_infall: A Molecular Line Infall Fitting Program

This code contains several simple radiative transfer models used for fitting the blue-asymmetric spectral line signature often found in infalling molecular cloud cores. It attempts to provide a direct measure of several physical parameters of the infalling core, including infall velocity, excitation temperature, and line of site optical depth. The code includes 6 radiative transfer models, however the conclusion of the associated paper is that the 5 parameter "hill" model (hill5) is most likely the best match to the physical excitation conditions of real infalling Bonnor-Ebert type clouds.

[ascl:2302.007] AnalyticLC: Dynamical modeling of planetary systems

AnalyticLC generates an analytic light-curve, and optionally RV and astrometry data, from a set of initial (free) orbital elements and simultaneously fits these data. Written in MATLAB, the code is fast and efficient, and provides insight into the motion of the orbital elements, which is difficult to obtain from numerical integration. A Python wrapper for AnalyticLC is available separately.

[ascl:1912.007] anesthetic: Nested sampling visualization

anesthetic brings together tools for processing nested sampling chains, leveraging standard scientific python libraries. The code provides computation of Bayesian evidences, Kullback-Liebler divergences and Bayesian model dimensionalities, marginalized 1d and 2d plots, and dynamic replaying of nested sampling. anesthetic was designed primarily for use with nested sampling outputs, although it can be used for normal MCMC chains.

[ascl:1807.012] AngPow: Fast computation of accurate tomographic power spectra

AngPow computes the auto (z1 = z2) and cross (z1 ≠ z2) angular power spectra between redshift bins (i.e. Cℓ(z1,z2)). The developed algorithm is based on developments on the Chebyshev polynomial basis and on the Clenshaw-Curtis quadrature method. AngPow is flexible and can handle any user-defined power spectra, transfer functions, bias functions, and redshift selection windows. The code is fast enough to be embedded inside programs exploring large cosmological parameter spaces through the Cℓ(z1,z2) comparison with data.

[ascl:9909.002] ANGSIZ: A general and practical method for calculating cosmological distances

The calculation of distances is of fundamental importance in extragalactic astronomy and cosmology. However, no practical implementation for the general case has previously been available. We derive a second-order differential equation for the angular size distance valid not only in all homogeneous Friedmann-Lemaitre cosmological models, parametrised by $lambda_{0}$ and $Omega_{0}$, but also in inhomogeneous 'on-average' Friedmann-Lemaitre models, where the inhomogeneity is given by the (in the general case redshift-dependent) parameter $eta$. Since most other distances can be obtained trivially from the angular size distance, and since the differential equation can be efficiently solved numerically, this offers for the first time a practical method for calculating distances in a large class of cosmological models. We also briefly discuss our numerical implementation, which is publicly available.

[submitted] AnisoCADO

A python package created around Eric Gendron’s code for analytically (and quickly) generating field-varying SCAO PSFs for the ELT.

[ascl:1411.019] Anmap: Image and data analysis

Anmap analyses and processes images and spectral data. Originally written for use in radio astronomy, much of its functionality is applicable to other disciplines; additional algorithms and analysis procedures allow direct use in, for example, NMR imaging and spectroscopy. Anmap emphasizes the analysis of data to extract quantitative results for comparison with theoretical models and/or other experimental data. To achieve this, Anmap provides a wide range of tools for analysis, fitting and modelling (including standard image and data processing algorithms). It also provides a powerful environment for users to develop their own analysis/processing tools either by combining existing algorithms and facilities with the very powerful command (scripting) language or by writing new routines in FORTRAN that integrate seamlessly with the rest of Anmap.

[ascl:1209.009] ANNz: Artificial Neural Networks for estimating photometric redshifts

ANNz is a freely available software package for photometric redshift estimation using Artificial Neural Networks. ANNz learns the relation between photometry and redshift from an appropriate training set of galaxies for which the redshift is already known. Where a large and representative training set is available, ANNz is a highly competitive tool when compared with traditional template-fitting methods.

For a newer implementation of this package, please see ANNz2 (ascl:1910.014).

[ascl:1910.014] ANNz2: Estimating photometric redshift and probability density functions using machine learning methods

ANNz2, a newer implementation of ANNz (ascl:1209.009), utilizes multiple machine learning methods such as artificial neural networks, boosted decision/regression trees and k-nearest neighbors to measure photo-zs based on limited spectral data. The code dynamically optimizes the performance of the photo-z estimation and properly derives the associated uncertainties. In addition to single-value solutions, ANNz2 also generates full probability density functions (PDFs) in two different ways. In addition, estimators are incorporated to mitigate possible problems of spectroscopic training samples which are not representative or are incomplete. ANNz2 is also adapted to provide optimized solutions to general classification problems, such as star/galaxy separation.

[ascl:1802.008] AntiparticleDM: Discriminating between Majorana and Dirac Dark Matter

AntiparticleDM calculates the prospects of future direct detection experiments to discriminate between Majorana and Dirac Dark Matter (i.e., to determine whether Dark Matter is its own antiparticle). Direct detection event rates and mock data generation are dealt with by a variation of the WIMpy code.

[ascl:2406.006] anzu: Measurements and emulation of Lagrangian bias models for clustering and lensing cross-correlations

The anzu package offers two independent codes for hybrid Lagrangian bias models in large-scale structure. The first code measures the hybrid "basis functions"; the second takes measurements of these basis functions and constructs an emulator to obtain predictions from them at any cosmology (within the bounds of the training set). anzu is self-contained; given a set of N-body simulations used to build emulators, it measures the basis functions. Alternatively, given measurements of the basis functions, anzu should in principle be useful for constructing a custom emulator.

[ascl:1010.017] AOFlagger: RFI Software

The radio frequency interference code AOFlagger automatically flags data and can be used to analyze the data in a measurement. The purpose of flagging is to mark samples that are affected by interfering sources such as radio stations, airplanes, electrical fences or other transmitting interferers.

The tools in the package are meant for offline use. The software package contains a graphical interface ("rfigui") that can be used to visualize a measurement set and analyze mitigation techniques. It also contains a console flagger ("rficonsole") that can execute a script of mitigation functions without the overhead of a graphical environment. All tools were written in C++.

The software has been tested extensively on low radio frequencies (150 MHz or lower) produced by the WSRT and LOFAR telescopes. LOFAR is the Low Frequency Array that is built in and around the Netherlands. Higher frequencies should work as well. Some of the methods implemented are the SumThreshold, the VarThreshold and the singular value decomposition (SVD) method. Included also are several surface fitting algorithms.

The software is published under the GNU General Public License version 3.

[ascl:1910.021] AOtools: Adaptive optics modeling and analysis toolkit

The AOtools package offers generic adaptive optics processing tools in addition to astronomy-specific methods; among these are analyzing data in the pupil plane, images and point spread functions in the focal plane, wavefront sensors, modeling of atmospheric turbulence, physical optical propagation of wavefronts, and conversion functions to convert stellar brightness into photon flux for a given waveband. The software also calculates integrated atmospheric parameters, such as coherence time and isoplanatic angle from atmospheric turbulence and wind speed profile.

[ascl:1910.012] AOTOOLS: Reduce IR images from Adaptive Optics

AOTOOLS reduces IR images from adaptive optics. It uses effective dithering, either sky subtraction or dark-subtration, and flat-fielding techniques to determine the effect of the instrument on an image of an object. It also performs bad pixel masking, degrades an AO on-axis PSF due to effects of anisoplanicity, and corrects an AO on-axis PSF due to effects of seeing.

[ascl:1103.011] AP3M: Adaptive Particle-particle, Particle-mesh Code

AP3M is an adaptive particle-particle, particle-mesh code. It is older than Hydra (ascl:1103.010) but faster and more memory-efficient for dark-matter only calculations. The Adaptive P3M technique (AP3M) is built around the standard P3M algorithm. AP3M produces fully equivalent forces to P3M but represents a more efficient implementation of the force splitting idea of P3M. The AP3M program may be used in any of the three modes with an appropriate choice of input parameter.

[ascl:2002.010] Apercal: Pipeline for the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope Apertif upgrade

Apercal is a dedicated, automated data reduction and analysis pipeline written for the Apertif (APERture Tile In Focus) upgrade to the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. This upgrade dramatically increases the field of view and survey speed of the telescope and is being used for survey observations that can produce 5 terabytes of data for each observation. Apercal uses existing and new tools and parallelization to provide the performance needed for the large volume of data produced Apertif surveys. The software is written entirely in Python and uses third–party astronomical software, such as AOFlagger (ascl:1010.017), CASA (ascl:1107.013), and Miriad (ascl:1106.007), for certain tasks. Apercal is modular, making it possible to run specific modules manually instead of the full pipeline, and information can be exchanged between modules because status parameters are written and read from a python pickled dictionary file. The pipeline can also run fully automatically.

[ascl:2211.019] APERO: A PipelinE to Reduce Observations

APERO (A PipelinE to Reduce Observations) performs data reduction for the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope's near-infrared spectropolarimeter SPIRou and offers different recipes or modules for performing specific tasks. APERO can individually run recipes or process a set of files, such as cleaning a data file of detector effects, collecting all dark files and creating a master dark image to use for correction, and creating a bad pixel mask for identifying and dealing with bad pixels. It can extract out flat images to measure the blaze and produced blaze correction and flat correction images, extract dark frames to provide correction for the thermal background after extraction of science or calibration frames, and correct extracted files for leakage coming from a FP (for OBJ_FP files only). It can also take a hot star and calculate telluric transmission, and then use the telluric transmission to calculate principle components (PCA) for correcting input images of atmospheric absorption, among many other tasks.

[ascl:1208.017] APLpy: Astronomical Plotting Library in Python

APLpy (the Astronomical Plotting Library in Python) is a Python module for producing publication-quality plots of astronomical imaging data in FITS format. The module uses Matplotlib, a powerful and interactive plotting package. It is capable of creating output files in several graphical formats, including EPS, PDF, PS, PNG, and SVG. Plots can be made interactively or by using scripts, and can generate co-aligned FITS cubes to make three-color RGB images. It also offers different overlay capabilities, including contour sets, markers with customizable symbols, and coordinate grids, and a range of other useful features.

[ascl:2101.010] apogee: Tools for APOGEE data

The apogee package works with SDSS-III APOGEE and SDSS-IV APOGEE-2 data. It reads various data products and applies cuts, works with APOGEE bitmasks, and plots APOGEE spectra. It can generate model spectra for APOGEE spectra, and APOGEE model grids can be used to fit spectra. apogee includes some simple stacking functions and implements the effective selection function for APOGEE.

[ascl:2306.022] apollinaire: Helioseismic and asteroseismic peakbagging frameworks

apollinaire provides functions and a framework for helioseismic and asteroseismic instruments data managing and analysis, and includes all the tools necessary to analyze the acoustic oscillations of solar-like stars. The core of the package is the peakbagging library, which provides a full framework to extract oscillation modes parameters from solar and stellar power spectra.

[ascl:2307.058] APOLLO: Radiative transfer and atmosphere spectroscopic retrieval for exoplanets

APOLLO forward models the radiative transfer of light through a planetary (or brown dwarf) atmosphere; it also forward models transit and emission spectra and retrieves atmospheric properties of extrasolar planets. The code has two operational modes: one to compute a planetary spectrum given a set of parameters, and one to retrieve those parameters based on an observed spectrum. The package uses emcee (ascl:1303.002) to find the best fit to a spectrum for a given parameter set. APOLLO is modular and offers many options that may be turned on and off, including the type of observations, a flexible molecular composition, multiple cloud prescriptions, multiple temperature-pressure profile prescriptions, multiple priors, and continuum normalization.

[ascl:1608.003] appaloosa: Python-based flare finding code for Kepler light curves

The appaloosa suite automates flare-finding in every Kepler light curves. It builds quiescent light curve models that include long- and short-cadence data through iterative de-trending and includes completeness estimates via artificial flare injection and recovery tests.

[ascl:1804.017] APPHi: Automated Photometry Pipeline for High Cadence Large Volume Data

APPHi (Automated Photometry Pipeline) carries out aperture and differential photometry of TAOS-II project data. It is computationally efficient and can be used also with other astronomical wide-field image data. APPHi works with large volumes of data and handles both FITS and HDF5 formats. Due the large number of stars that the software has to handle in an enormous number of frames, it is optimized to automatically find the best value for parameters to carry out the photometry, such as mask size for aperture, size of window for extraction of a single star, and the number of counts for the threshold for detecting a faint star. Although intended to work with TAOS-II data, APPHi can analyze any set of astronomical images and is a robust and versatile tool to performing stellar aperture and differential photometry.

[ascl:1810.018] APPLawD: Accurate Potentials in Power Law Disks

APPLawD (Accurate Disk Potentials for Power Law Surface densities) determines the gravitational potential in the equatorial plane of a flat axially symmetric disk (inside and outside) with finite size and power law surface density profile. Potential values are computed on the basis of the density splitting method, where the residual Poisson kernel is expanded over the modulus of the complete elliptic integral of the first kind. In contrast with classical multipole expansions of potential theory, the residual series converges linearly inside sources, leading to very accurate potential values for low order truncations of the series. The code is easy to use, works under variable precision, and is written in Fortran 90 with no external dependencies.

[ascl:2304.002] Applefy: Robust detection limits for high-contrast imaging

Applefy calculates detection limits for exoplanet high contrast imaging (HCI) datasets. The package provides features and functionalities to improve the accuracy and robustness of contrast curve calculations. Applefy implements the classical approach based on the t-test, as well as the parametric boostrap test for non-Gaussian residual noise. Applefy enables the comparison of imaging results across instruments with different noise characteristics.

[ascl:1308.005] APPSPACK: Asynchronous Parallel Pattern Search

APPSPACK is serial or parallel, derivative-free optimization software for solving nonlinear unconstrained, bound-constrained, and linearly-constrained optimization problems, with possibly noisy and expensive objective functions.

[ascl:1408.021] APS: Active Parameter Searching

APS finds Frequentist confidence limits on high-dimensional parameter spaces by using Gaussian Process interpolation to identify regions of parameter space for which chisquared is less than or equal to some specified limit. The code is written in C++, is robust against multi-modal chisquared functions and converges comparably fast to Monte Carlo methods. Code is also provided to draw Bayesian credible limits using the outputs of APS, though this code does not converge as well. APS requires the linear algebra libraries LAPACK, BLAS, and ARPACK (ascl:1311.010) to run.

[ascl:1208.003] APT: Aperture Photometry Tool

Aperture Photometry Tool (APT) is software for astronomers and students interested in manually exploring the photometric qualities of astronomical images. It has a graphical user interface (GUI) which allows the image data associated with aperture photometry calculations for point and extended sources to be visualized and, therefore, more effectively analyzed. Mouse-clicking on a source in the displayed image draws a circular or elliptical aperture and sky annulus around the source and computes the source intensity and its uncertainty, along with several commonly used measures of the local sky background and its variability. The results are displayed and can be optionally saved to an aperture-photometry-table file and plotted on graphs in various ways using functions available in the software. APT is geared toward processing sources in a small number of images and is not suitable for bulk processing a large number of images, unlike other aperture photometry packages (e.g., SExtractor). However, APT does have a convenient source-list tool that enables calculations for a large number of detections in a given image. The source-list tool can be run either in automatic mode to generate an aperture photometry table quickly or in manual mode to permit inspection and adjustment of the calculation for each individual detection. APT displays a variety of useful graphs, including image histogram, and aperture slices, source scatter plot, sky scatter plot, sky histogram, radial profile, curve of growth, and aperture-photometry-table scatter plots and histograms. APT has functions for customizing calculations, including outlier rejection, pixel “picking” and “zapping,” and a selection of source and sky models. The radial-profile-interpolation source model, accessed via the radial-profile-plot panel, allows recovery of source intensity from pixels with missing data and can be especially beneficial in crowded fields.

[ascl:1007.005] Arcetri Spectral Code for Thin Plasmas

The Arcetri spectral code allows to evaluate the spectrum of the radiation emitted by hot and optically thin plasmas in the spectral range 1 - 2000 Angstroms. The database has been updated including atomic data and radiative and collisional rates to calculate level population and line emissivities for a number of ions of the minor elements; a critical compilation of the electron collision excitation for these elements has been performed. The present version of the program includes the CHIANTI database for the most abundant elements, the minor elements data, and Fe III atomic model, radiative and collisional data.

[ascl:1107.011] ARCHANGEL: Galaxy Photometry System

ARCHANGEL is a Unix-based package for the surface photometry of galaxies. While oriented for large angular size systems (i.e. many pixels), its tools can be applied to any imaging data of any size. The package core contains routines to perform the following critical galaxy photometry functions: sky determination; frame cleaning; ellipse fitting; profile fitting; and total and isophotal magnitudes.

The goal of the package is to provide an automated, assembly-line type of reduction system for galaxy photometry of space-based or ground-based imaging data. The procedures outlined in the documentation are flux independent, thus, these routines can be used for non-optical data as well as typical imaging datasets.

ARCHANGEL has been tested on several current OS's (RedHat Linux, Ubuntu Linux, Solaris, Mac OS X). A tarball for installation is available at the download page. The main routines are Python and FORTRAN based, therefore, a current installation of Python and a FORTRAN compiler are required. The ARCHANGEL package also contains Python hooks to the PGPLOT package, an XML processor and network tools which automatically link to data archives (i.e. NED, HST, 2MASS, etc) to download images in a non-interactive manner.

[ascl:2006.015] ARCHI: Add-on pipeline module for background star analysis from CHEOPS data

The CHaracterizing ExOPlanet Satellite (CHEOPS) mission pipeline provides photometry for the central star in its field; ARCHI takes in data from the CHEOPS mission pipeline, analyzes the background stars, and determines the photometry of these stars, thus creating the possibility of producing photometric time-series of several close-by targets at once, in addition to using different stars in the image to calibrate systematic errors.

[ascl:1805.012] Arcmancer: Geodesics and polarized radiative transfer library

Arcmancer computes geodesics and performs polarized radiative transfer in user-specified spacetimes. The library supports Riemannian and semi-Riemannian spaces of any dimension and metric; it also supports multiple simultaneous coordinate charts, embedded geometric shapes, local coordinate systems, and automatic parallel propagation. Arcmancer can be used to solve various problems in numerical geometry, such as solving the curve equation of motion using adaptive integration with configurable tolerances and differential equations along precomputed curves. It also provides support for curves with an arbitrary acceleration term and generic tools for generating ray initial conditions and performing parallel computation over the image, among other tools.

[ascl:1909.010] AREPO: Cosmological magnetohydrodynamical moving-mesh simulation code

AREPO is a massively parallel gravity and magnetohydrodynamics code for astrophysics, designed for problems of large dynamic range. It employs a finite-volume approach to discretize the equations of hydrodynamics on a moving Voronoi mesh, and a tree-particle-mesh method for gravitational interactions. AREPO is originally optimized for cosmological simulations of structure formation, but has also been used in many other applications in astrophysics.

[ascl:2011.010] ARES: Accelerated Reionization Era Simulations

The Accelerated Reionization Era Simulations (ARES) code rapidly generates models for the global 21-cm signal. It can also be used as a 1-D radiative transfer code, stand-alone non-equilibrium chemistry solver, or global radiation background calculator.

[ascl:1205.009] ARES: Automatic Routine for line Equivalent widths in stellar Spectra

ARES was developed for the measurement of Equivalent Width of absortion lines in stellar spectra; it can also be used to determine fundamental spectroscopic stellar parameters.The code reads a 1D FITS spectra and fits the requested lines in order to calculate the Equivalent width. The code is written in C++ based on the standard method of determining EWs. It automates the manual procedure that one normally carries out when using interactive routines such as the splot routine implemented in IRAF.

[ascl:1807.004] ARKCoS: Radial kernel convolution on the sphere

ARKCoS (Accelerated radial kernel convolution on the sphere) efficiently convolves pixelated maps on the sphere with radially symmetric kernels with compact support. It performs the convolution along isolatitude rings in Fourier space and integrates in longitudinal direction in pixel space. The computational costs scale linearly with the kernel support, making the method most beneficial for convolution with compact kernels. Typical applications include CMB beam smoothing, symmetric wavelet analyses, and point-source filtering operations. The software is written in C++/CUDA and provides two independent code paths to do the necessary computation either on conventional hardware (CPUs), or on graphics processing units (GPUs).

[ascl:1505.005] ARoME: Analytical Rossiter-McLaughlin Effects

The ARoMe (Analytical Rossiter-McLaughlin Effects) library generates analytical Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effects. It models the Doppler-shift of a star during a transit measured by the fit of a cross-correlation function by a Gaussian function, fit of an observed spectrum by a modeled one, and the weighted mean.

[ascl:2306.049] ARPACK-NG: Large scale eigenvalue problem solver

ARPACK-NG provides a common repository with maintained versions and a test suite for the ARPACK (ascl:1311.010) code, which is no longer updated; it is a collection of Fortran77 subroutines designed to solve large scale eigenvalue problems. ARPACK-NG offers routines for banded matrices, singular value decomposition, single and double precision real arithmetic versions for symmetric, non-symmetric standard or generalized problems, and a reverse communication interface (RCI). It also provides example driver routines that may be used as templates to implement numerous shift-invert strategies for all problem types, data types and precision, in addition to other tools. The ARPACK-NG project, started by Debian, Octave, and Scilab, is now a community project maintained by volunteers.

[ascl:1311.010] ARPACK: Solving large scale eigenvalue problems

ARPACK is a collection of Fortran77 subroutines designed to solve large scale eigenvalue problems. The package is designed to compute a few eigenvalues and corresponding eigenvectors of a general n by n matrix A. It is most appropriate for large sparse or structured matrices A where structured means that a matrix-vector product w <- Av requires order n rather than the usual order n2 floating point operations. This software is based upon an algorithmic variant of the Arnoldi process called the Implicitly Restarted Arnoldi Method (IRAM). When the matrix A is symmetric it reduces to a variant of the Lanczos process called the Implicitly Restarted Lanczos Method (IRLM). These variants may be viewed as a synthesis of the Arnoldi/Lanczos process with the Implicitly Shifted QR technique that is suitable for large scale problems. For many standard problems, a matrix factorization is not required; only the action of the matrix on a vector is needed. ARPACK is capable of solving large scale symmetric, nonsymmetric, and generalized eigenproblems from significant application areas.

A common community-maintained repository for this software, ARPACK-NG (ascl:2306.049), is available.

[ascl:2107.018] ART: A Reconstruction Tool

ART reconstructs log-probability distributions using Gaussian processes. It requires an existing MCMC chain or similar set of samples from a probability distribution, including the log-probabilities. Gaussian process regression is used for interpolating the log-probability for the rescontruction, allowing for easy resampling, importance sampling, marginalization, testing different samplers, investigating chain convergence, and other operations.

[ascl:1810.007] ARTES: 3D Monte Carlo scattering radiative transfer in planetary atmospheres

The 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer code ARTES calculates reflected light and thermal radiation in a spherical grid with a parameterized distribution of gas, clouds, hazes, and circumplanetary material. Designed specifically for (polarized) scattered light simulations of planetary atmospheres, it can compute both reflected stellar light and thermal emission from the planet for an arbitrary atmospheric structure and distribution of opacity sources. Multiple scattering, absorption, and polarization are fully treated and the output includes an image, spectrum, or phase curve. Several tools are included to create opacities and scattering matrices for molecules and clouds.

[ascl:1802.004] ARTIP: Automated Radio Telescope Image Processing Pipeline

The Automated Radio Telescope Image Processing Pipeline (ARTIP) automates the entire process of flagging, calibrating, and imaging for radio-interferometric data. ARTIP starts with raw data, i.e. a measurement set and goes through multiple stages, such as flux calibration, bandpass calibration, phase calibration, and imaging to generate continuum and spectral line images. Each stage can also be run independently. The pipeline provides continuous feedback to the user through various messages, charts and logs. It is written using standard python libraries and the CASA package. The pipeline can deal with datasets with multiple spectral windows and also multiple target sources which may have arbitrary combinations of flux/bandpass/phase calibrators.

[ascl:2103.020] ARTIS: 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer code for supernovae

ARTIS is a 3D radiative transfer code for Type Ia supernovae using the Monte Carlo method with indivisible energy packets. It incorporates polarization and virtual packets and non-LTE physics appropriate for the nebular phase of Type Ia supernovae.

[ascl:1402.014] ARTIST: Adaptable Radiative Transfer Innovations for Submillimeter Telescopes

ARTIST is a suite of tools for comprehensive multi-dimensional radiative transfer calculations of dust and line emission, as well as their polarization, to help interpret observations from submillimeter telescopes. The ARTIST package consists of LIME, a radiative transfer code that uses adaptive gridding allowing simulations of sources with arbitrary multi-dimensional (1D, 2D, 3D) and time-dependent structures, thus ensuring rapid convergence; the DustPol and LinePol tools for modeling the polarization of the line and dust emission; and an interface run from Python scripts that manages the interaction between a general model library and LIME, and a graphical interface to simulate images.

[ascl:2110.006] ArtPop: Artificial Stellar Populations generator

ArtPop (Artificial Stellar Populations) synthesizes stellar populations and simulates realistic images of stellar systems. The code is modular, making it possible to use each of its functionalities independently or together. ArtPop can build stellar populations independently from generating mock images, as one might want to do when interested only in calculating integrated photometric properties of the population. The code can also generate stellar magnitudes and artificial galaxies, which can be inject into real imaging data.

[ascl:2004.012] ArviZ: Exploratory analysis of Bayesian models

ArviZ provides backend-agnostic tools for diagnostics and visualizations of Bayesian inference by first converting inference data into xarray objects. It includes functions for posterior analysis, model checking, comparison and diagnostics. ArviZ’s functions work with NumPy arrays, dictionaries of arrays, xarray datasets, and have built-in support for PyMC3 (ascl:1610.016), PyStan, CmdStanPy, Pyro (ascl:1507.018), NumPyro, emcee (ascl:1303.002), and TensorFlow Probability objects. A Julia wrapper is also available.

[ascl:1204.016] ASCfit: Automatic Stellar Coordinate Fitting Package

A modular software package for automatically fitting astrometric world coordinates (WCS) onto raw optical or infrared FITS images. Image stars are identified with stars in a reference catalog (USNO-A2 or 2MASS), and coordinates derived as a simple linear transformation from (X,Y) pixels to (RA,DEC) to the accuracy level of the reference catalog used. The package works with both optical and infrared images, at sidereal and non-sidereal tracking rates.

[ascl:1804.001] ASERA: A Spectrum Eye Recognition Assistant

ASERA, ASpectrum Eye Recognition Assistant, aids in quasar spectral recognition and redshift measurement and can also be used to recognize various types of spectra of stars, galaxies and AGNs (Active Galactic Nucleus). This interactive software allows users to visualize observed spectra, superimpose template spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and interactively access related spectral line information. ASERA is an efficient and user-friendly semi-automated toolkit for the accurate classification of spectra observed by LAMOST (the Large Sky Area Multi-object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope) and is available as a standalone Java application and as a Java applet. The software offers several functions, including wavelength and flux scale settings, zoom in and out, redshift estimation, and spectral line identification.

[ascl:1603.009] Asfgrid: Asteroseismic parameters for a star

asfgrid computes asteroseismic parameters for a star with given stellar parameters and vice versa. Written in Python, it determines delta_nu, nu_max or masses via interpolation over a grid.

[ascl:1912.003] ASKAPsoft: ASKAP science data processor software

ASKAPsoft provides data processing functionality for Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder, including calibration, spectral line imaging, continuum imaging, source detection and generation of source catalogs, and transient detection. The MPI-based package is the primary software for storing and processing raw data, and initiating the archiving of resulting science data products into the data archive (CASDA). The processing pipelines within ASKAPsoft are largely written in C++ built on top of casacore (ascl:1912.002) and other third party libraries.

[ascl:1609.020] Askaryan Module: Askaryan electric fields predictor

The Askaryan Module is a C++ class that predicts the electric fields that Askaryan-based detectors detect; it is computationally efficient and accurate, performing fully analytic calculations requiring no a priori MC analysis to compute the entire field, for any frequencies, times, or viewing angles chosen by the user.

[ascl:2205.018] ASOHF: Adaptive Spherical Overdensity Halo Finder

ASOHF (Adaptive Spherical Overdensity Halo Finder) identifies bound dark matter structures (dark matter haloes) in the outputs of cosmological simulations, and works directly on an input particle list. The computational cost of running ASOHF in simulations with a large number of particles can be reduced by using a domain decomposition to split the simulation box into smaller boxes, or subdomains, which are then processed independently. The basic output of ASOHF is a halo catalog. The package includes a python code to build a merger tree from ASOHF outputs.

[ascl:1807.030] ASP: Ames Stereo Pipeline

ASP (Ames Stereo Pipeline) provides fully automated geodesy and stereogrammetry tools for processing stereo imagery captured from satellites (around Earth and other planets), robotic rovers, aerial cameras, and historical imagery, with and without accurate camera pose information. It produces cartographic products, including digital elevation models (DEMs), ortho-projected imagery, 3D models, and bundle-adjusted networks of cameras. ASP's data products are suitable for science analysis, mission planning, and public outreach.

[ascl:1112.017] ASpec: Astronomical Spectrum Analysis Package

ASpec is a spectrum and line analysis package developed at STScI. ASpec is designed as an add-on package for IRAF and incorporates a variety of analysis techniques for astronomical spectra. ASpec operates on spectra from a wide variety of ground-based and space-based instruments and allows simultaneous handling of spectra from different wavelength regimes. The package accommodates non-linear dispersion relations and provides a variety of functions, individually or in combination, with which to fit spectral features and the continuum. It also permits the masking of known bad data. ASpec provides a powerful, intuitive graphical user interface implemented using the IRAF Object Manager and customized to handle: data input/output (I/O); on-line help; selection of relevant features for analysis; plotting and graphical interaction; and data base management.

[ascl:1209.015] Aspects: Probabilistic/positional association of catalogs of sources

Given two catalogs K and K' of n and n' astrophysical sources, respectively, Aspects (Association positionnelle/probabiliste de catalogues de sources) computes, for any objects MiK and M'jK', the probability that M'j is a counterpart of Mi, i.e. that they are the same source. To determine this probability of association, the code takes into account the coordinates and the positional uncertainties of all the objects. Aspects also computes the probability P(Ai, 0 | C ∩ C') that Mi has no counterpart.

Aspects is written in Fortran 95; the required Fortran 90 Numerical Recipes routines used in version 1.0 have been replaced with free equivalents in version 2.0.

[ascl:1806.031] ASPIC: Accurate Slow-roll Predictions for Inflationary Cosmology

Aspic, written in modern Fortran, computes various observable quantities used in cosmology from definite single field inflationary models. It provides an efficient, extendable, and accurate way of comparing theoretical inflationary predictions with cosmological data and supports many (~70) models of inflation. The Hubble flow functions, observable quantities up to second order in the slow-roll approximation, are in direct correspondence with the spectral index, the tensor-to-scalar ratio and the running of the primordial power spectrum. The ASPIC library also provides the field potential, its first and second derivatives, the energy density at the end of inflation, the energy density at the end of reheating, and the field value (or e-fold value) at which the pivot scale crossed the Hubble radius during inflation. All these quantities are computed in a way which is consistent with the existence of a reheating phase.

[ascl:1510.006] ASPIC: STARLINK image processing package

ASPIC handled basic astronomical image processing. Early releases concentrated on image arithmetic, standard filters, expansion/contraction/selection/combination of images, and displaying and manipulating images on the ARGS and other devices. Later releases added new astronomy-specific applications to this sound framework. The ASPIC collection of about 400 image-processing programs was written using the Starlink "interim" environment in the 1980; the software is now obsolete.

[ascl:2202.022] ASPIRED: Automated SpectroPhotometric Image REDuction

ASPIRED reduces 2D spectral data from raw image to wavelength and flux calibrated 1D spectrum automatically without any user input (quicklook quality), and provides a set of easily configurable routines to build pipelines for long slit spectrographs on different telescopes (science quality). It delivers near real-time data reduction, which can facilitate automated or interactive decision making, allowing "on-the-fly" modification of observing strategies and rapid triggering of other facilities.

[ascl:1310.005] ASPRO 2: Astronomical Software to PRepare Observations

ASPRO 2 (Astronomical Software to PRepare Observations) is an observation preparation tool for interferometric observations with the VLTI or other interferometers such as CHARA and SUSI. It is a Java standalone program that provides a dynamic graphical interface to simulate the projected baseline evolution during observations (super-synthesis) and derive visibilities for targets (i.e., single star, binaries, user defined FITS image). It offers other useful functions such as the ability to load and save your observation settings and generate Observing Blocks.

[ascl:1903.011] AsPy: Aspherical fluctuations on the spherical collapse background

AsPy computes the determinants of aspherical fluctuations on the spherical collapse background. Written in Python, this procedure includes analytic factorization and cancellation of the so-called `IR-divergences'—spurious enhanced contributions that appear in the dipole sector and are associated with large bulk flows.

[ascl:2304.001] ASSIST: Solar system test particles trajectories integrator

ASSIST integrates test particle trajectories in the field of the Sun, Moon, planets, and massive asteroids, with the positions of the masses obtained from the JPL DE441 ephemeris and its associated asteroid perturber file. Using REBOUND's (ascl:1110.016) IAS15 integrator, ASSIST incorporates the most significant gravitational harmonics and general relativistic corrections and accounts for position- and velocity-dependent non-gravitational effects. The first-order variational equations are included for all terms to support orbit fitting and covariance mapping.

[ascl:1404.016] AST: World Coordinate Systems in Astronomy

The AST library provides a comprehensive range of facilities for attaching world coordinate systems to astronomical data, for retrieving and interpreting that information in a variety of formats, including FITS-WCS, and for generating graphical output based on it. Core projection algorithms are provided by WCSLIB (ascl:1108.003) and astrometry is provided by the PAL (ascl:1606.002) and SOFA (ascl:1403.026) libraries. AST bindings are available in Python (pyast), Java (JNIAST) and Perl (Starlink::AST). AST is used as the plotting and astrometry library in DS9 and GAIA, and is distributed separately and as part of the Starlink software collection.

[ascl:1505.002] ASteCA: Automated Stellar Cluster Analysis

ASteCA (Automated Stellar Cluster Analysis), written in Python, fully automates standard tests applied on star clusters in order to determine their characteristics, including center, radius, and stars' membership probabilities. It also determines associated intrinsic/extrinsic parameters, including metallicity, age, reddening, distance, total mass, and binarity fraction, among others.

[ascl:1403.023] ASTERIX: X-ray Data Processing System

ASTERIX is a general purpose X-ray data reduction package optimized for ROSAT data reduction. ASTERIX uses the Starlink software environment (ascl:1110.012).

[ascl:2112.009] AsteroGaP: Asteroid Gaussian Processes

The Bayesian-based Gaussian Process model AsteroGaP (Asteroid Gaussian Processes) fits sparsely-sampled asteroid light curves. By utilizing a more flexible Gaussian Process framework for modeling asteroid light curves, it is able to represent light curves in a periodic but non-sinusoidal manner.

[ascl:1607.016] astLib: Tools for research astronomers

astLib is a set of Python modules for performing astronomical plots, some statistics, common calculations, coordinate conversions, and manipulating FITS images with World Coordinate System (WCS) information through PyWCSTools, a simple wrapping of WCSTools (ascl:1109.015).

[ascl:2004.006] ASTRAEUS: Semi-analytical semi-numerical galaxy evolution and reionization code

ASTRAEUS (semi-numerical rAdiative tranSfer coupling of galaxy formaTion and Reionization in n-body dArk mattEr simUlationS) self-consistently derives the evolution of galaxies and the reionization of the IGM based on the merger trees and density fields of a DM-only N-body simulation. It models gas accretion, star formation, SN feedback, the time and spatial evolution of the ionized regions, accounting for recombinations, HI fractions and photoionization rates within ionized regions, and radiative feedback. ASTRAEUS is for studying the galaxy-reionization interplay in the first billion years. The underlying code is written in C and is MPI-parallelized; its modular design allows new physical processes and galaxy properties to be added easily. ASTRAEUS can be run on a tree-branch-by-tree-branch basis (i.e., fully vertical) or on a redshift-by-redshift basis (i.e., fully horizontal) when evolving the galaxies by using local horizontal merger trees.

[ascl:1605.009] ASTRiDE: Automated Streak Detection for Astronomical Images

ASTRiDE detects streaks in astronomical images using a "border" of each object (i.e. "boundary-tracing" or "contour-tracing") and their morphological parameters. Fast moving objects such as meteors, satellites, near-Earth objects (NEOs), or even cosmic rays can leave streak-like traces in the images; ASTRiDE can detect not only long streaks but also relatively short or curved streaks.

[ascl:2103.028] Astro-Fix: Correcting astronomical bad pixels in Python

astrofix is an astronomical image correction algorithm based on Gaussian Process Regression. It trains itself to apply the optimal interpolation kernel for each image, performing multiple times better than median replacement and interpolation with a fixed kernel.

[ascl:1907.032] Astro-SCRAPPY: Speedy Cosmic Ray Annihilation Package in Python

Astro-SCRAPPY detects cosmic rays in images (numpy arrays), based on Pieter van Dokkum's L.A.Cosmic algorithm and originally adapted from cosmics.py written by Malte Tewes. This implementation is optimized for speed, resulting in slight difference from the original code, such as automatic recognition of saturated stars (rather than treating such stars as large cosmic rays, and use of a separable median filter instead of the true median filter. Astro-SCRAPPY is an AstroPy (ascl:1304.002) affiliated package.

[ascl:1705.016] astroABC: Approximate Bayesian Computation Sequential Monte Carlo sampler

astroABC is a Python implementation of an Approximate Bayesian Computation Sequential Monte Carlo (ABC SMC) sampler for parameter estimation. astroABC allows for massive parallelization using MPI, a framework that handles spawning of processes across multiple nodes. It has the ability to create MPI groups with different communicators, one for the sampler and several others for the forward model simulation, which speeds up sampling time considerably. For smaller jobs the Python multiprocessing option is also available.

[ascl:1912.010] AstroAccelerate: Accelerated software package for processing time-domain radio astronomy data

AstroAccelerate processes time-domain radio astronomy data. It offers a standalone code that can be used to process filterbank data and a library that performs GPU-accelerated single pulse processing (SPS), Fourier Domain Acceleration Searching (FDAS) and dedispersion in real-time on very large data-sets comparable to those that will be produced by next-generation radio telescopes such as the SKA. AstroAccelerate uses NVIDIAR GPUs, and is configurable, stable, and easily maintained.

[ascl:1906.001] Astroalign: Asterism-matching alignment of astronomical images

Astroalign tries to register (align) two stellar astronomical images, especially when there is no WCS information available. It does so by finding similar 3-point asterisms (triangles) in both images and deducing the affine transformation between them. Generic registration routines try to match feature points, using corner detection routines to make the point correspondence. These generally fail for stellar astronomical images since stars have very little stable structure so are, in general, indistinguishable from each other. Asterism matching is more robust and closer to the human way of matching stellar images. Astroalign can match images of very different field of view, point-spread function, seeing and atmospheric conditions. It may require special care or may not work on images of extended objects with few point-like sources or in crowded fields.

[ascl:1311.003] AstroAsciiData: ASCII table Python module

ASCII tables continue to be one of the most popular and widely used data exchange formats in astronomy. AstroAsciiData, written in Python, imports all reasonably well-formed ASCII tables. It retains formatting of data values, allows column-first access, supports SExtractor style headings, performs column sorting, and exports data to other formats, including FITS, Numpy/Numarray, and LaTeX table format. It also offers interchangeable comment character, column delimiter and null value.

[ascl:1104.002] AstroBEAR: Adaptive Mesh Refinement Code for Ideal Hydrodynamics & Magnetohydrodynamics

AstroBEAR is a modular hydrodynamic & magnetohydrodynamic code environment designed for a variety of astrophysical applications. It uses the BEARCLAW package, a multidimensional, Eulerian computational code used to solve hyperbolic systems of equations. AstroBEAR allows adaptive-mesh-refinment (AMR) simulations in 2, 2.5 (i.e., cylindrical), and 3 dimensions, in either cartesian or curvilinear coordinates. Parallel applications are supported through the MPI architecture. AstroBEAR is written in Fortran 90/95 using standard libraries.

AstroBEAR supports hydrodynamic (HD) and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) applications using a variety of spatial and temporal methods. MHD simulations are kept divergence-free via the constrained transport (CT) methods of Balsara & Spicer. Three different equation of state environments are available: ideal gas, gas with differing isentropic γ, and the analytic Thomas-Fermi formulation of A.R. Bell.

[ascl:1512.007] AstroBlend: Visualization package for use with Blender

AstroBlend is a visualization package for use in the three dimensional animation and modeling software, Blender. It reads data in via a text file or can use pre-fab isosurface files stored as OBJ or Wavefront files. AstroBlend supports a variety of codes such as FLASH (ascl:1010.082), Enzo (ascl:1010.072), and Athena (ascl:1010.014), and combines artistic 3D models with computational astrophysics datasets to create models and animations.

[ascl:2006.017] AstroCatR: Time series reconstruction of large-scale astronomical catalogs

AstroCatR reconstructs celestial objects' time series data for astronomical catalogs. It is a command-line program running on the Linux platform and is implemented in C and Python; AstroCatR's capabilities are based on specialized sky partitioning and MPI parallel programming. The package contains three parts: ETL (extract-transform-load) pre-processing, TS-matching calculation, and time series data retrieval. Once the user obtains the original catalogs, running ETL pre-processing generates a sky zoning file. The TS-matching module marks celestial objects, and finally, running the Query program searches celestial objects from the time series datasets which matched with the target.

[ascl:1507.010] Astrochem: Abundances of chemical species in the interstellar medium

Astrochem computes the abundances of chemical species in the interstellar medium, as function of time. It studies the chemistry in a variety of astronomical objects, including diffuse clouds, dense clouds, photodissociation regions, prestellar cores, protostars, and protostellar disks. Astrochem reads a network of chemical reactions from a text file, builds up a system of kinetic rates equations, and solves it using a state-of-the-art stiff ordinary differential equation (ODE) solver. The Jacobian matrix of the system is computed implicitly, so the resolution of the system is extremely fast: large networks containing several thousands of reactions are usually solved in a few seconds. A variety of gas phase process are considered, as well as simple gas-grain interactions, such as the freeze-out and the desorption via several mechanisms (thermal desorption, cosmic-ray desorption and photo-desorption). The computed abundances are written in a HDF5 file, and can be plotted in different ways with the tools provided with Astrochem. Chemical reactions and their rates are written in a format which is meant to be easy to read and to edit. A tool to convert the chemical networks from the OSU and KIDA databases into this format is also provided. Astrochem is written in C, and its source code is distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL).

[ascl:2407.015] AstroCLIP: Multimodal contrastive pretraining for astronomical data

AstroCLIP performs contrastive pre-training between two different kinds of astronomical data modalities (multi-band imaging and optical spectra) to yield a meaningful embedding space which captures physical information about galaxies and is shared between both modalities. The embeddings can be used as the basis for competitive zero- and few-shot learning on a variety of downstream tasks, including similarity search, redshift estimation, galaxy property prediction, and morphology classification.

[ascl:1905.007] Astrocut: Tools for creating cutouts of TESS images

The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) produces Full Frame Images (FFIs) at a half hour cadence and keeps the same pointing for ~27 days at a time. Astrocut performs the same cutout across all FFIs that share a common pointing to create a time series of images on a small portion of the sky.

The Astrocut package has two parts: the CubeFactory and the CutoutFactory. The CubeFactory class creates a large image cube from a list of FFI files, which allows the cutout operation to be performed efficiently. The CutoutFactory class performs the actual cutout and builds a target pixel file (TPF) that is compatible with TESS pipeline TPFs. Because this software operates on TESS mission-produced FFIs, the resulting TPFs are not background-subtracted. In addition to the Astrocut software itself, the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) provides a cutout service, TESScut, which runs Astrocut on MAST servers, and allows users to simply request cutouts through a web form or direct HTTP API query.

[ascl:1804.004] AstroCV: Astronomy computer vision library

AstroCV processes and analyzes big astronomical datasets, and is intended to provide a community repository of high performance Python and C++ algorithms used for image processing and computer vision. The library offers methods for object recognition, segmentation and classification, with emphasis in the automatic detection and classification of galaxies.

[ascl:2111.001] astroDDPM: Realistic galaxy simulation via score-based generative models

astroDDPM uses a denoising diffusion probabilistic model (DDPM) to synthesize galaxies that are qualitatively and physically indistinguishable from the real thing. The similarity of the synthesized images to real galaxies from the Photometry and Rotation curve OBservations from Extragalactic Surveys (PROBES) sample and from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey is quantified using the Fréchet Inception Distance to test for subjective and morphological similarity. The emergent physical properties (such as total magnitude, color, and half light radius) of a ground truth parent and synthesized child dataset are also compared to generate a Synthetic Galaxy Distance metric. The DDPM approach produces sharper and more realistic images than other generative methods such as Adversarial Networks (with the downside of more costly inference), and could be used to produce large samples of synthetic observations tailored to a specific imaging survey. Potential uses of the DDPM include accurate in-painting of occluded data, such as satellite trails, and domain transfer, where new input images can be processed to mimic the properties of the DDPM training set.

[ascl:1907.016] astrodendro: Astronomical data dendrogram creator

Astrodendro, written in Python, creates dendrograms for exploring and displaying hierarchical structures in observed or simulated astronomical data. It handles noisy data by allowing specification of the minimum height of a structure and the minimum number of pixels needed for an independent structure. Astrodendro allows interactive viewing of computed dendrograms and can also produce publication-quality plots with the non-interactive plotting interface.

[ascl:1010.013] AstroGK: Astrophysical Gyrokinetics Code

The gyrokinetic simulation code AstroGK is developed to study fundamental aspects of kinetic plasmas and for applications mainly to astrophysical problems. AstroGK is an Eulerian slab code that solves the electromagnetic Gyrokinetic-Maxwell equations in five-dimensional phase space, and is derived from the existing gyrokinetics code GS2 by removing magnetic geometry effects. Algorithms used in the code are described. The code is benchmarked using linear and nonlinear problems. Serial and parallel performance scalings are also presented.

[ascl:2003.013] AstroHOG: Analysis correlations using the Histograms of Oriented Gradients

AstroHOG compares extended spectral-line observations (PPV cubes); the histogram of oriented gradients (HOG) technique takes as input two PPV cubes and provides an estimate of their spatial correlation across velocity channels to study spatial correlation between different tracers of the ISM.

[ascl:1309.001] AstroImageJ: ImageJ for Astronomy

AstroImageJ is generic ImageJ (ascl:1206.013) with customizations to the base code and a packaged set of astronomy specific plugins. It reads and writes FITS images with standard headers, displays astronomical coordinates for images with WCS, supports photometry for developing color-magnitude data, offers flat field, scaled dark, and non-linearity processing, and includes tools for precision photometry that can be used during real-time data acquisition.

[ascl:1502.022] AstroLines: Astrophysical line list generator in the H-band

AstroLines adjusts spectral line parameters (gf and damping constant) starting from an initial line list. Written in IDL and tailored to the APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), it runs a slightly modified version of MOOG (ascl:1202.009) to compare synthetic spectra with FTS spectra of the Sun and Arcturus.

[ascl:1406.008] ASTROM: Basic astrometry program

ASTROM performs "plate reductions" by taking user-provided star positions and the (x,y) coordinates of the corresponding star images and establishes the relationship between (x,y) and (ra,dec), thus enabling the coordinates of unknown stars to be determined. ASTROM is distributed with the Starlink software (ascl:1110.012) and uses SLALIB (ascl:1403.025).

[ascl:1010.078] AstroMD: A Multi Dimensional Visualization and Analysis Toolkit for Astrophysics

Over the past few years, the role of visualization for scientific purpose has grown up enormously. Astronomy makes an extended use of visualization techniques to analyze data, and scientific visualization has became a fundamental part of modern researches in Astronomy. With the evolution of high performance computers, numerical simulations have assumed a great role in the scientific investigation, allowing the user to run simulation with higher and higher resolution. Data produced in these simulations are often multi-dimensional arrays with several physical quantities. These data are very hard to manage and to analyze efficiently. Consequently the data analysis and visualization tools must follow the new requirements of the research. AstroMD is a tool for data analysis and visualization of astrophysical data and can manage different physical quantities and multi-dimensional data sets. The tool uses virtual reality techniques by which the user has the impression of travelling through a computer-based multi-dimensional model.

[ascl:2205.020] ASTROMER: Building light curves embeddings using transfomers

ASTROMER is a Transformer-based model trained on millions of stars for the representation of light curves. Pretrained models can be directly used or finetuned on specific datasets. ASTROMER is useful in downstream tasks in which data are limited to train deep learning models.

[ascl:1203.012] Astrometrica: Astrometric data reduction of CCD images

Astrometrica is an interactive software tool for scientific grade astrometric data reduction of CCD images. The current version of the software is for the Windows 32bit operating system family. Astrometrica reads FITS (8, 16 and 32 bit integer files) and SBIG image files. The size of the images is limited only by available memory. It also offers automatic image calibration (Dark Frame and Flat Field correction), automatic reference star identification, automatic moving object detection and identification, and access to new-generation star catalogs (PPMXL, UCAC 3 and CMC-14), in addition to online help and other features. Astrometrica is shareware, available for use for a limited period of time (100 days) for free; special arrangements can be made for educational projects.

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