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[ascl:1511.011] SparsePZ: Sparse Representation of Photometric Redshift PDFs

SparsePZ uses sparse basis representation to fully represent individual photometric redshift probability density functions (PDFs). This approach requires approximately half the parameters for the same multi-Gaussian fitting accuracy, and has the additional advantage that an entire PDF can be stored by using a 4-byte integer per basis function. Only 10-20 points per galaxy are needed to reconstruct both the individual PDFs and the ensemble redshift distribution, N(z), to an accuracy of 99.9 per cent when compared to the one built using the original PDFs computed with a resolution of δz = 0.01, reducing the required storage of 200 original values by a factor of 10-20. This basis representation can be directly extended to a cosmological analysis, thereby increasing computational performance without losing resolution or accuracy.

[ascl:2007.022] SPARTA: SPectroscopic vARiabiliTy Analysis

SPARTA analyzes periodically-variable spectroscopic observations. Intended for common astronomical uses, SPARTA facilitates analysis of single- and double-lined binaries, high-precision radial velocity extraction, and periodicity searches in complex, high dimensional data. It includes two modules, UNICOR and USuRPER. UNICOR analyzes spectra using 1-d CCF. It includes maximum-likelihood analysis of multi-order spectra and detection of systematic shifts. USuRPER (Unit Sphere Representation PERiodogram) is a phase-distance correlation (PDC) based periodogram and is designed for very high-dimensional data such as spectra.

[ascl:2007.003] SPARTA: Subhalo and PARticle Trajectory Analysis

SPARTA is a post-processing framework for particle-based cosmological simulations. The code is written in pure, MPI-parallelized C and is optimized for high performance. The main purpose of SPARTA is to understand the formation of structure in a dynamical sense, namely by analyzing the trajectories (or orbits) of dark matter particles around their halos. Within this framework, the user can add analysis modules that operate on individual trajectories or entire halos. The initial goal of SPARTA was to compute the splashback radius of halos, but numerous other applications have been implemented as well, including spherical overdensity calculations and tracking subhalos via their constituent particles.

[ascl:2202.015] SPARTAN: SPectroscopic And photometRic fiTting tool for Astronomical aNalysis

SPARTAN fits the spectroscopy and photometry of distant galaxies. The code implements multiple interfaces to help in the configuration of the fitting and the inspection of the results. SPARTAN relies on pre-computed input files (such as stellar population and IGM extinction), available for download, to save time in the fitting process.

[ascl:1711.001] SpcAudace: Spectroscopic processing and analysis package of Audela software

SpcAudace processes long slit spectra with automated pipelines and performs astrophysical analysis of the latter data. These powerful pipelines do all the required steps in one pass: standard preprocessing, masking of bad pixels, geometric corrections, registration, optimized spectrum extraction, wavelength calibration and instrumental response computation and correction. Both high and low resolution long slit spectra are managed for stellar and non-stellar targets. Many types of publication-quality figures can be easily produced: pdf and png plots or annotated time series plots. Astrophysical quantities can be derived from individual or large amount of spectra with advanced functions: from line profile characteristics to equivalent width and periodogram. More than 300 documented functions are available and can be used into TCL scripts for automation. SpcAudace is based on Audela open source software.

[ascl:1010.016] SpDust/SpDust.2: Code to Calculate Spinning Dust Spectra

SpDust is an IDL program that evaluates the spinning dust emissivity for user-provided environmental conditions. A new version of the code became available in March, 2010.

[ascl:1203.003] spec2d: DEEP2 DEIMOS Spectral Pipeline

The DEEP2 DEIMOS Data Reduction Pipeline ("spec2d") is an IDL-based, automated software package designed to reduce Keck/DEIMOS multi-slit spectroscopic observations, collected as part of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey. The pipeline is best suited for handling data taken with the 1200 line/mm grating tilted towards the red (lambda_c ~ 7800Å). The spec2d reduction package takes the raw DEIMOS data as its input and produces a variety of outputs including 2-d slit spectra and 1-d object spectra.

[ascl:1407.003] SPECDRE: Spectroscopy Data Reduction

Specdre performs spectroscopy data reduction and analysis. General features of the package include data cube manipulation, arc line calibration, resampling and spectral fitting. Particular care is taken with error propagation, including tracking covariance. SPECDRE is distributed as part of the Starlink software collection (ascl:1110.012).

[ascl:2311.003] Special-Blurring: Compare quantum-spacetime foam models to GRB localizations

The IDL code Special-Blurring compares models of quantum-foam-induced blurring with the full dataset of gamma-ray burst localizations available from the NASA High Energy Astrophysics Science Research Archive (as of 1 November 2022). This includes GRB221009A, which was especially bright and detected in extremely high energy TeV gamma-rays. An upper limit of the parameter alpha (giving the maximal strength of quantum blurring) can be entered, which is scaled in the model of blurring (called "Phi") operating much like "seeing" from the ground in the optical, and those calculations are plotted against the observations.

[ascl:2301.028] special: SPEctral Characterization of directly ImAged Low-mass companions

special (SPEctral Characterization of directly ImAged Low-mass companions) characterizes low-mass (M, L, T) dwarfs down to giant planets at optical/IR wavelengths. It can also be used more generally to characterize any type of object with a measured spectrum, provided a relevant input model grid, regardless of the observational method used to obtain the spectrum (direct imaging or not) and regardless of the format of the spectra (multi-band photometry, low-resolution or medium-resolution spectrum, or a combination thereof). It analyzes measured spectra, calculating the spectral correlation between channels of an IFS datacube and empirical spectral indices for MLT-dwarfs. It fits input spectra to either photo-/atmospheric model grids or a blackbody model, including additional parameters such as (extra) black body component(s), extinction and total-to-selective extinction ratio, and can use emcee (ascl:1303.002), nestle (ascl:2103.022), or UltraNest (ascl:1611.001) samplers infer posterior distributions on spectral model parameters in a Bayesian framework, among other tasks.

[ascl:2307.057] species: Atmospheric characterization of directly imaged exoplanets

species (spectral characterization and inference for exoplanet science) provides a coherent framework for spectral and photometric analysis of directly imaged exoplanets and brown dwarfs which builds on publicly-available data and models from various resources. species contains tools for grid and free retrievals using Bayesian inference, synthetic photometry, interpolating a variety atmospheric and evolutionary model grids (including the possibility to add a custom grid), color-magnitude and color-color diagrams, empirical spectral analysis, spectral and photometric calibration, and analysis of emission lines.

[ascl:1404.014] SpecPro: Astronomical spectra viewer and analyzer

SpecPro is an interactive program for viewing and analyzing spectra, particularly in the context of modern imaging surveys. In addition to displaying the 1D and 2D spectrum, SpecPro can simultaneously display available stamp images as well as the spectral energy distribution of a source. This extra information can help significantly in assessing a spectrum.

[ascl:1904.018] Specstack: A simple spectral stacking tool

Specstack creates stacked spectra using a simple algorithm with sigma-clipping to combine the spectra of galaxies in the rest-frame into a single averaged spectrum. Though written originally for galaxy spectra, it also works for other types of objects. It is written in Python and is started from the command-line.

[ascl:1111.005] SPECTCOL: Spectroscopic and Collisional Data Retrieval

Studies of astrophysical non-LTE media require the combination of atomic and molecular spectroscopic and collisional data often described differently in various databases. SPECTCOL is a tool that implements VAMDC standards, retrieve relevant information from different databases such as CDMS, HITRAN, BASECOL, and can upload local files. All transfer of data between the client and the databases use the VAMDC-XSAMS schema. The spectroscopic and collisional information is combined and useful outputs (ascii or xsams) are provided for the study of the interstellar medium.

[ascl:2108.011] Spectra-Without-Windows: Window-free analysis of the BOSS DR12 power spectrum and bispectrum

Spectra-Without-Windows (formerly called BOSS-Without-Windows) analyzes Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) DR12 data using quadratic and cubic estimators. It contains analysis codes to estimate unwindowed power spectra and unwindowed bispectra. It also supplies the raw power and bispectrum spectrum measurements of BOSS and 999 Patchy simulations, and contains a utility function to generate the background number density, n(r) from the survey mask and n(z) distribution. This code has been replaced by the newer and more powerful 3D polyspectrum code PolyBin3D (ascl:2404.006).

[ascl:1701.003] Spectra: Time series power spectrum calculator

Spectra calculates the power spectrum of a time series equally spaced or not based on the Spectral Correlation Coefficient (Ferraz-Mello 1981, Astron. Journal 86 (4), 619). It is very efficient for detection of low frequencies.

[ascl:2104.004] Spectractor: Spectrum extraction tool for slitless spectrophotometry

Spectractor extracts spectra from slitless spectrophotometric images and measures the atmospheric transmission on the line of sight if standard stars are targeted. It has been optimized on CTIO images but can be configured to analyze any kind of slitless data that contains the order 0 and the order 1 of a spectrum. In particular, it can be used to estimate the atmospheric transmission of the Vera Rubin Observatory site using the dedicated Auxiliary Telescope.

[ascl:1609.017] spectral-cube: Read and analyze astrophysical spectral data cubes

Spectral-cube provides an easy way to read, manipulate, analyze, and write data cubes with two positional dimensions and one spectral dimension, optionally with Stokes parameters. It is a versatile data container for building custom analysis routines. It provides a uniform interface to spectral cubes, robust to the wide range of conventions of axis order, spatial projections, and spectral units that exist in the wild, and allows easy extraction of cube sub-regions using physical coordinates. It has the ability to create, combine, and apply masks to datasets and is designed to work with datasets too large to load into memory, and provide basic summary statistic methods like moments and array aggregates.

[ascl:2209.017] SpectraPy: Extract and reduce astronomical spectral data

SpectraPy collects algorithms and methods for data reduction of astronomical spectra obtained by a through slits spectrograph. It produces two-dimensional wavelength calibrated spectra corrected by instrument distortions. The library is designed to be spectrograph independent and can be used on both longslit (LS) and multi object spectrograph (MOS) data. SpectraPy comes with a set of already configured spectrographs, but it can be easily configured to reduce data of other instruments.

[ascl:1202.010] SPECTRE: Manipulation of single-order spectra

SPECTRE's chief purpose is the manipulation of single-order spectra, and it performs many of the tasks contained in such IRAF routines as "splot" and "rv". It is not meant to replace the much more general capabilities of IRAF, but does some functions in a manner that some might find useful. A brief list of SPECTRE tasks are: spectrum smoothing; equivalent width calculation; continuum rectification; noise spike excision; and spectrum comparison. SPECTRE was written to manipulate coude spectra, and thus is probably most useful for working on high dispersion spectra. Echelle spectra can be gathered from various observatories, reduced to singly-dimensioned spectra using IRAF, then written out as FITS files, thus becoming accessible to SPECTRE. Three different spectra may be manipulated and displayed simultaneously. SPECTRE, written in standard FORTRAN77, can be used only with the SM graphics package.

[ascl:2104.019] SpectRes: Simple spectral resampling

SpectRes efficiently resamples spectra and their associated uncertainties onto an arbitrary wavelength grid. The Python function works with any grid of wavelength values, including non-uniform sampling, and preserves the integrated flux. This may be of use for binning data to increase the signal to noise ratio, obtaining synthetic photometry, or resampling model spectra to match the sampling of observational data.

[submitted] spectroflat

Spectroflat is a generic python calibration library for spectro-polarimetric data. It can be plugged into existing python based data reduction pipelines or used as a standalone calibration and performance ananlzsis tool.
It includes smile distortion correction and flat field extraction.

[submitted] spectrogrism

This module implements an ad-hoc grism-based spectrograph optical model. It provides a flexible chromatic mapping between the input focal plane and the output detector plane, based on an effective simplified ray-tracing model of the key optical elements defining the spectrograph (collimator, prism, grating, camera), described by a restricted number of physically-motivated distortion parameters.

[ascl:9910.002] SPECTRUM: A stellar spectral synthesis program

SPECTRUM ((C) Richard O. Gray, 1992-2008) is a stellar spectral synthesis program which runs on a number of platforms, including most flavors of UNIX and LINUX. It will also run under Windwos 9x/ME/NT/2000/XP using the Cygwin tools or the distributed Windows binaries. The code for SPECTRUM has been written in the "C" language. SPECTRUM computes the LTE synthetic spectrum given a stellar atmosphere model. SPECTRUM can use as input the fully blanketed stellar atmosphere models of Robert Kurucz including the new models of Castelli and Kurucz, but any other stellar atmosphere model which can be cast into the format of Kurucz's models can be used as well. SPECTRUM can be programmed with "command-line switches" to give a number of different outputs. In the default mode, SPECTRUM computes the stellar-disk-integrated normalized-intensity spectrum, but in addition, SPECTRUM will compute the absolute monochromatic flux from the stellar atmosphere or the specific intensity from any point on the stellar surface.

[ascl:1902.012] Specutils: Spectroscopic analysis and reduction

Specutils provides a basic interface for the loading, manipulation, and common forms of analysis of spectroscopic data. Its generic data containers and accompanying modules can be used to build a particular scientific workflow or higher-level analysis tool. It is an AstroPy (ascl:1304.002) affiliated package, and SpecViz (ascl:1902.011), which is built on top of Specutils, provides a visual, interactive interface to its analysis capabilities.

[ascl:1210.016] Specview: 1-D spectral visualization and analysis of astronomical spectrograms

Specview is a tool for 1-D spectral visualization and analysis of astronomical spectrograms. Written in Java, it is capable of reading all the Hubble Space Telescope spectral data formats as well as data from several other instruments (such as IUE, FUSE, ISO, FORS and SDSS), preview spectra from MAST, and data from generic FITS and ASCII tables. It can read data from Virtual Observatory servers, and read and write spectrogram data in Virtual Observatory SED format. It can also read files in the SPC Galactic format used in the chemistry field. Once ingested, data can be plotted and examined with a large selection of custom settings. Specview supports instrument-specific data quality handling, flexible spectral units conversions, custom plotting attributes, plot annotations, tiled plots, hardcopy to JPEG files and PostScript file or printer, etc. Specview can be used to build wide-band SEDs, overplotting or combining data from the same astronomical source taken with different instruments and/or spectral bands. Data can be further processed with averaging, splicing, detrending, and Fourier filtering tools. Specview has a spectral model fitting capability that enables the user to work with multi-component models (including user-defined models) and fit models to data.

[ascl:1902.011] SpecViz: 1D Spectral Visualization Tool

SpecViz interactively visualizes and analyzes 1D astronomical spectra. It reads data from FITS and ASCII tables and allows spectra to be easily plotted and examined. It supports instrument-specific data quality handling, flexible spectral units conversions, custom plotting attributes, plot annotations, tiled plots, among other features. SpecViz includes a measurement tool for spectral lines for performing and recording measurements and a model fitting capability for creating simple (e.g., single Gaussian) or multi-component models (e.g., multiple Gaussians for emission and absorption lines in addition to regions of flat continua). SpecViz is built on top of the Specutils (ascl:1902.012) Astropy-affiliated python library, providing a visual, interactive interface to the analysis capabilities in that library.

The functionality of SpecViz is now actively developed as part of Jdaviz (ascl:2307.001).

[ascl:1310.008] SPECX: Spectral Line Data Reduction Package

SPECX is a general purpose line data reduction system. It can read and write FITS data cubes but has specialist support for the GSD format data from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. It includes commands to store and retrieve intermediate spectra in storage registers and perform the fitting and removal of polynomial, harmonic and Gaussian baselines.

SPECX can filter and edit spectra and list and display spectra on a graphics terminal. It is able to perform Fourier transform and power spectrum calculations, process up to eight spectra (quadrants) simultaneously with either the same or different center, and assemble a number of reduced individual spectra into a map file and contour or greyscale any plane or planes of the resulting cube.

Two versions of SPECX are distributed. Version 6.x is the VMS and Unix version and is distributed as part of the Starlink software collection. Version 7.x is a complete rewrite of SPECX distributed for Windows.

[ascl:2405.001] SPEDAS: Space Physics Environment Data Analysis System

The SPEDAS (Space Physics Environment Data Analysis Software) framework supports multi-mission data ingestion, analysis and visualization for the Space Physics community. It standardizes the retrieval of data from distributed repositories, the scientific processing with a powerful set of legacy routines, the quick visualization with full output control and the graph creation for use in papers and presentations. SPEDAS includes a GUI for ease of use by novice users, works on multiple platforms, and though based on IDL, can be used with or without an IDL license. The framework supports plugin modules for multiple projects such as THEMIS, MMS, and WIND, and provides interfaces for software modules developed by the individual teams of those missions. A Python implementation of the framework, PySPEDAS (ascl:2405.005), is also available.

[ascl:1807.014] SPEGID: Single-Pulse Event Group IDentification

SPEGID (Single-Pulse Event Group IDentification) identifies astrophysical pulse candidates as trial single-pulse event groups (SPEGs) by first applying Density Based Spatial Clustering of Applications with Noise (DBSCAN) on trial single-pulse events and then merging the clusters that fall within the expected DM (Dispersion Measure) and time span of astrophysical pulses. SPEGID also calculates the peak score for each SPEG in the S/N versus DM space to identify the expected peak-like shape in the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio versus DM curve of astrophysical pulses. Additionally, SPEGID groups SPEGs that appear at a consistent DM and therefore are likely emitted from the same source. After running SPEGID, periocity.py can be used to find (or verify) the underlying periodicity among a group of SPEGs (i.e., astrophysical pulse candidates).

[ascl:2212.026] Spender: Neural spectrum encoder and decoder

Spender establishes a restframe for galaxy spectra that has higher resolution and larger wavelength range than the spectra from which it is trained. The model can be trained from spectra at different redshifts or even from different instruments without the need to standardize the observations. Spender also has an explicit, differentiable redshift dependence, which can be coupled with a redshift estimator for a fully data-driven spectrum analysis pipeline. The code describes the restframe spectrum by an autoencoder and transforms the restframe model to the observed redshift; it also matches the spectral resolution and line spread function of the instrument.

[ascl:2007.004] spex_to_xspec: Convert SPEX output to XSPEC input

spex_to_xspec takes the output from the collisional ionisation equilibrium model in the SPEX spectral modelling and fitting package (ascl:1308.014), and converts it into a form usable by the XSPEC spectral fitting package (ascl:9910.005). For a list of temperatures it computes the line strengths and continuum spectra using SPEX. These are collated and written into an APEC-format table model which can be loaded into Xspec. By allowing SPEX models to be loaded into XSPEC, the program allows easy comparison between the results of the SPEX and APEC codes.

[ascl:1308.014] SPEX: High-resolution cosmic X-ray spectra analysis

SPEX is optimized for the analysis and interpretation of high-resolution cosmic X-ray spectra. The software is especially suited for fitting spectra obtained by current X-ray observatories like XMM-Newton, Chandra, and Suzaku. SPEX can fit multiple spectra with different model components simultaneously and handles highly complex models with many free parameters.

[ascl:2007.017] SPEX: Spectral Executive

SPEX provides a uniform interface suitable for the X-ray spectral analysis of a number of solar (or other) instruments in the X and Gamma Ray energy ranges. Part of the SolarSoft (ascl:1208.013) library, this package is suitable for any datastream which can be placed in the form of response vs interval where the response is usually a counting rate (spectrum) and the interval is normally an accumulation over time. Together with an algorithm which can be used to relate a model input spectrum to the observed response, generally a response matrix, the dataset is amenable to analysis with this package. Currently the data from a large number of instruments, including SMM (HXRBS, GRS Gamma, GRS X1, and GRS X2), Yohkoh (HXT, HXS, GRS, and SXT,) CGRO (BATSE SPEC and BATSE LAD), WIND (TGRS), HIREX, and NEAR (PIN). SPEX's next generation software is available in OSPEX (ascl:2007.018), an object-oriented package that is also part of and dependent on SolarSoft.

[ascl:1404.017] Spextool: Spectral EXtraction tool

Spextool (Spectral EXtraction tool) is an IDL-based data reduction package for SpeX, a medium resolution near-infrared spectrograph on the NASA IRTF. It performs all of the steps necessary to produce spectra ready for analysis and publication including non-linearity corrections, flat fielding, wavelength calibration, telluric correction, flux calibration, and order merging.

[ascl:9912.001] SPH_1D: Hierarchical gravity/SPH treecode for simulations of interacting galaxies

We describe a fast tree algorithm for gravitational N-body simulation on SIMD parallel computers. The tree construction uses fast, parallel sorts. The sorted lists are recursively divided along their x, y and z coordinates. This data structure is a completely balanced tree (i.e., each particle is paired with exactly one other particle) and maintains good spatial locality. An implementation of this tree-building algorithm on a 16k processor Maspar MP-1 performs well and constitutes only a small fraction (approximately 15%) of the entire cycle of finding the accelerations. Each node in the tree is treated as a monopole. The tree search and the summation of accelerations also perform well. During the tree search, node data that is needed from another processor is simply fetched. Roughly 55% of the tree search time is spent in communications between processors. We apply the code to two problems of astrophysical interest. The first is a simulation of the close passage of two gravitationally, interacting, disk galaxies using 65,636 particles. We also simulate the formation of structure in an expanding, model universe using 1,048,576 particles. Our code attains speeds comparable to one head of a Cray Y-MP, so single instruction, multiple data (SIMD) type computers can be used for these simulations. The cost/performance ratio for SIMD machines like the Maspar MP-1 make them an extremely attractive alternative to either vector processors or large multiple instruction, multiple data (MIMD) type parallel computers. With further optimizations (e.g., more careful load balancing), speeds in excess of today's vector processing computers should be possible.

[ascl:2105.007] SpheCow: Galaxy and dark matter halo dynamical properties

SpheCow explores the structure and dynamics of any spherical model for galaxies and dark matter haloes. The lightweight and flexible code automatically calculates the dynamical properties, assuming an isotropic or Osipkov-Merritt anisotropic orbital structure, of any model with either an analytical density profile or an analytical surface density profile as a starting point. SpheCow contains readily usable implementations for many standard models, including the Plummer, Hernquist, NFW, Einasto, Sérsic and Nuker models. The code is easily extendable, allowing new models to be added in a straightforward way. The code is publicly available as a set of C++ routines and as a Python module.

[ascl:1806.023] Spheral++: Coupled hydrodynamical and gravitational numerical simulations

Spheral++ provides a steerable parallel environment for performing coupled hydrodynamical and gravitational numerical simulations. Hydrodynamics and gravity are modeled using particle-based methods (SPH and N-Body). It uses an Adaptive Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (ASPH) algorithm, provides a total energy conserving compatible hydro mode, and performs fluid and solid material modeling and damage and fracture modeling in solids.

[ascl:2406.008] sphereint: Integrate data on a grid within a sphere

sphereint calculates the numerical volume in a sphere. It provides a weight for each grid position based on whether or not it is in (weight = 1), out (weight = 0), or partially in (weight in between 0 and 1) a sphere of a given radius. A cubic cell is placed around each grid position and the volume of the cell in the sphere (assuming a flat surface in the cell) is calculated and normalized by the cell volume to obtain the weight.

[ascl:1309.004] Spherical: Geometry operations and searches on spherical surfaces

The Spherical Library provides an efficient and accurate mathematical representation of shapes on the celestial sphere, such as sky coverage and footprints. Shapes of arbitrary complexity and size can be dynamically created from simple building blocks, whose exact area is also analytically computed. This methodology is also perfectly suited for censoring problematic parts of datasets, e.g., bad seeing, satellite trails or diffraction spikes of bright stars.

[ascl:1311.005] Spheroid: Electromagnetic Scattering by Spheroids

Spheroid determines the size distribution of polarizing interstellar dust grains based on electromagnetic scattering by spheroidal particles. It contains subroutines to treat the case of complex refractive indices, and also includes checks for some limiting cases.

[ascl:1502.012] SPHGR: Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics Galaxy Reduction

SPHGR (Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics Galaxy Reduction) is a python based open-source framework for analyzing smoothed-particle hydrodynamic simulations. Its basic form can run a baryonic group finder to identify galaxies and a halo finder to identify dark matter halos; it can also assign said galaxies to their respective halos, calculate halo & galaxy global properties, and iterate through previous time steps to identify the most-massive progenitors of each halo and galaxy. Data about each individual halo and galaxy is collated and easy to access.

SPHGR supports a wide range of simulations types including N-body, full cosmological volumes, and zoom-in runs. Support for multiple SPH code outputs is provided by pyGadgetReader (ascl:1411.001), mainly Gadget (ascl:0003.001) and TIPSY (ascl:1111.015).

[ascl:1103.009] SPHRAY: A Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Ray Tracer for Radiative Transfer

SPHRAY, a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) ray tracer, is designed to solve the 3D, time dependent, radiative transfer (RT) equations for arbitrary density fields. The SPH nature of SPHRAY makes the incorporation of separate hydrodynamics and gravity solvers very natural. SPHRAY relies on a Monte Carlo (MC) ray tracing scheme that does not interpolate the SPH particles onto a grid but instead integrates directly through the SPH kernels. Given initial conditions and a description of the sources of ionizing radiation, the code will calculate the non-equilibrium ionization state (HI, HII, HeI, HeII, HeIII, e) and temperature (internal energy/entropy) of each SPH particle. The sources of radiation can include point like objects, diffuse recombination radiation, and a background field from outside the computational volume. The MC ray tracing implementation allows for the quick introduction of new physics and is parallelization friendly. A quick Axis Aligned Bounding Box (AABB) test taken from computer graphics applications allows for the acceleration of the raytracing component. We present the algorithms used in SPHRAY and verify the code by performing all the test problems detailed in the recent Radiative Transfer Comparison Project of Iliev et. al. The Fortran 90 source code for SPHRAY and example SPH density fields are made available online.

[ascl:1709.001] SPHYNX: SPH hydrocode for subsonic hydrodynamical instabilities and strong shocks

SPHYNX addresses subsonic hydrodynamical instabilities and strong shocks; it is Newtonian, grounded on the Euler-Lagrange formulation of the smoothed-particle hydrodynamics technique, and density based. SPHYNX uses an integral approach for estimating gradients, a flexible family of interpolators to suppress pairing instability, and incorporates volume elements to provides better partition of the unity.

[ascl:1903.015] SPICE: Observation Geometry System for Space Science Missions

The SPICE (Spacecraft Planet Instrument C-matrix [“Camera matrix”] Events) toolkit offers a set of building blocks for constructing tools supporting multi-mission, international space exploration programs and research in planetary science, heliophysics, Earth science, and for observations from terrestrial observatories. It computes many kinds of observation geometry parameters, including the ephemerides, orientations, sizes, and shapes of planets, satellites, comets and asteroids. It can also compute the orientation of a spacecraft, its various moving structures, and an instrument's field-of-view location on a planet's surface or atmosphere. It can determine when a specified geometric event occurs, such as when an object is in shadow or is in transit across another object. The SPICE toolkit is available in FORTRAN 77, ANSI C, IDL, and MATLAB.

[ascl:1903.016] SpiceyPy: Python wrapper for the NAIF C SPICE Toolkit

SpiceyPy is a Python wrapper for the NAIF C SPICE Toolkit (ascl:1903.015). It is compatible with Python 2 and 3, and was written using ctypes.

[ascl:1711.019] SPIDERMAN: Fast code to simulate secondary transits and phase curves

SPIDERMAN calculates exoplanet phase curves and secondary eclipses with arbitrary surface brightness distributions in two dimensions. The code uses a geometrical algorithm to solve exactly the area of sections of the disc of the planet that are occulted by the star. Approximately 1000 models can be generated per second in typical use, which makes making Markov Chain Monte Carlo analyses practicable. The code is modular and allows comparison of the effect of multiple different brightness distributions for a dataset.

[ascl:1608.020] SPIDERz: SuPport vector classification for IDEntifying Redshifts

SPIDERz (SuPport vector classification for IDEntifying Redshifts) applies powerful support vector machine (SVM) optimization and statistical learning techniques to custom data sets to obtain accurate photometric redshift (photo-z) estimations. It is written for the IDL environment and can be applied to traditional data sets consisting of photometric band magnitudes, or alternatively to data sets with additional galaxy parameters (such as shape information) to investigate potential correlations between the extra galaxy parameters and redshift.

[ascl:2102.001] spinOS: SPectroscopic and INterferometric Orbital Solution finder

spinOS calculates binary orbital elements. Given a set of radial velocity measurements of a spectroscopic binary and/or relative position measurement of an astrometric binary, spinOS fits an orbital model by minimizing a chi squared metric. These routines are neatly packaged in a graphical user interface, developed using tkinter, facilitating use. Minimization is achieved by default using a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm from lmfit [ascl:1606.014]. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo option is available to sample the posterior probability distribution in order to estimate errors on the orbital elements.

[ascl:2009.006] SPInS: Stellar Parameters INferred Systematically

SPInS (Stellar Parameters INferred Systematically) provides the age, mass, and radius of a star, among other parameters, from a set of photometric, spectroscopic, interferometric, and/or asteroseismic observational constraints; it also generates error bars and correlations. Derived from AIMS (ascl:1611.014), it relies on a stellar model grid and uses a Bayesian approach to find the PDF of stellar parameters from a set of classical constraints. The heart of SPInS is a MCMC solver coupled with interpolation within a pre-computed stellar model grid. The code can consider priors such as the IMF or SFR and can characterize single stars or coeval stars, such as members of binary systems or of stellar clusters.

[ascl:2303.010] spinsfast: Fast and exact spin-s spherical harmonic transforms

spinsfast is a fast spin-s spherical harmonic transform algorithm, which is flexible and exact for band-limited functions. It permits the computation of several distinct spin transforms simultaneously. Specifically, only one set of special functions is computed for transforms of quantities with any spin, namely the Wigner d matrices evaluated at π/2, which may be computed with efficient recursions. For any spin, the computation scales as O(L^3), where L is the band limit of the function.

[ascl:2210.002] SPINspiral: Parameter estimation for analyzing gravitational-wave signals

SPINspiral analyzes gravitational-wave signals from stellar-mass binary inspirals detected by ground-based interferometers such as LIGO and Virgo. It performs parameter estimation on these signals using Markov-chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) techniques. This analysis includes the spins of the binary components. Written in C, the package is modular; its main routine is as small as possible and calls other routines, which perform tasks such as reading input, choosing and setting (starting or injection) parameters, and handling noise. Other routines compute overlaps and likelihoods, contain the MCMC core, and manage more general support functions and third-party routines.

[ascl:2206.014] SpinSpotter: Stellar rotation periods from high-cadence photometry calculator

SpinSpotter calculates stellar rotation periods from high-cadence photometry. The code uses the autocorrelation function (ACF) to identify stellar rotation periods up to one-third the observational baseline of the data. SpinSpotter includes diagnostic tools that describe features in the ACF and allows tuning of the tolerance with which to accept a period detection.

[ascl:1710.004] SPIPS: Spectro-Photo-Interferometry of Pulsating Stars

SPIPS (Spectro-Photo-Interferometry of Pulsating Stars) combines radial velocimetry, interferometry, and photometry to estimate physical parameters of pulsating stars, including presence of infrared excess, color excess, Teff, and ratio distance/p-factor. The global model-based parallax-of-pulsation method is implemented in Python. Derived parameters have a high level of confidence; statistical precision is improved (compared to other methods) due to the large number of data taken into account, accuracy is improved by using consistent physical modeling and reliability of the derived parameters is strengthened by redundancy in the data.

[ascl:1512.015] Spirality: Spiral arm pitch angle measurement

Spirality measures spiral arm pitch angles by fitting galaxy images to spiral templates of known pitch. Written in MATLAB, the code package also includes GenSpiral, which produces FITS images of synthetic spirals, and SpiralArmCount, which uses a one-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform to count the spiral arms of a galaxy after its pitch is determined.

[ascl:2006.016] SPISEA: Stellar Population Interface for Stellar Evolution and Atmospheres

SPISEA (Stellar Population Interface for Stellar Evolution and Atmospheres) generates single-age, single-metallicity populations (i.e., star clusters). The software (formerly called PyPopStar) provides control over different parameters, including cluster characteristics (age, metallicity, mass, distance); total extinction, differential extinction, and extinction law; stellar evolution and atmosphere models; stellar multiplicity and Initial Mass Function; and photometric filters. SPISEA can be used to create a cluster isochrone in many filters using different stellar models, generate a star cluster at any age with an unusual IMF and unresolved multiplicity, and make a spectrum of a star cluster in integrated light.

[ascl:1103.004] SPLASH: Interactive Visualization Tool for Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations

SPLASH (formerly SUPERSPHPLOT) visualizes output from (astrophysical) simulations using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method in one, two and three dimensions. Written in Fortran 90, it uses the PGPLOT graphics subroutine library for plotting. It is based around a command-line menu structure but utilizes the interactive capabilities of PGPLOT to manipulate data interactively in the plotting window. SPLASH is fully interactive; visualizations can be changed rapidly at the touch of a button (e.g. zooming, rotating, shifting cross section positions etc). Data is read directly from the code dump format giving rapid access to results and the visualization is advanced forwards and backwards through timesteps by single keystrokes. SPLASH uses the SPH kernel to render plots of not only density but other physical quantities, giving a smooth representation of the data.

[ascl:1402.008] SPLAT-VO: Spectral Analysis Tool for the Virtual Observatory

SPLAT-VO is an extension of the SPLAT (Spectral Analysis Tool, ascl:1402.007) graphical tool for displaying, comparing, modifying and analyzing astronomical spectra; it includes facilities that allow it to work as part of the Virtual Observatory (VO). SPLAT-VO comes in two different forms, one for querying and downloading spectra from SSAP servers and one for interoperating with VO tools, such as TOPCAT (ascl:1101.010).

[ascl:1402.007] SPLAT: Spectral Analysis Tool

SPLAT is a graphical tool for displaying, comparing, modifying and analyzing astronomical spectra stored in NDF, FITS and TEXT files as well as in NDX format. It can read in many spectra at the same time and then display these as line plots. Display windows can show one or several spectra at the same time and can be interactively zoomed and scrolled, centered on specific wavelengths, provide continuous coordinate readout, produce printable hardcopy and be configured in many ways. Analysis facilities include the fitting of a polynomial to selected parts of a spectrum, the fitting of Gaussian, Lorentzian and Voigt profiles to emission and absorption lines and the filtering of spectra using average, median and line-shape window functions as well as wavelet denoising. SPLAT also supports a full range of coordinate systems for spectra, which allows coordinates to be displayed and aligned in many different coordinate systems (wavelength, frequency, energy, velocity) and transformed between these and different standards of rest (topocentric, heliocentric, dynamic and kinematic local standards of rest, etc). SPLAT is distributed as part of the Starlink (ascl:1110.012) software collection.

[ascl:1103.005] Splotch: Ray Tracer to Visualize SPH Simulations

Splotch is a light and fast, publicly available, ray-tracer software tool which supports the effective visualization of cosmological simulations data. The algorithm it relies on is designed to deal with point-like data, optimizing the ray-tracing calculation by ordering the particles as a function of their 'depth', defined as a function of one of the coordinates or other associated parameters. Realistic three-dimensional impressions are reached through a composition of the final colour in each pixel properly calculating emission and absorption of individual volume elements.

[ascl:1809.006] spops: Spinning black-hole binary population synthesis

spops is a database of populations synthesis simulations of spinning black-hole binary systems, together with a python module to query it. Data are obtained with the startrack and precession [ascl:1611.004] numerical codes to consistently evolve binary stars from formation to gravitational-wave detection. spops allows quick exploration of the interplay between stellar physics and black-hole spin dynamics.

[ascl:1411.015] SPOTROD: Semi-analytic model for transits of spotted stars

SPOTROD is a model for planetary transits of stars with an arbitrary limb darkening law and a number of homogeneous, circular spots on their surface. It facilitates analysis of anomalies due to starspot eclipses, and is a free, open source implementation written in C with a Python API.

[ascl:1506.008] SPRITE: Sparsity-based super-resolution algorithm

SPRITE (Sparse Recovery of InstrumenTal rEsponse) computes a well-resolved compact source image from several undersampled and noisy observations. The algorithm is based on sparse regularization; adding a sparse penalty in the recovery leads to far better accuracy in terms of ellipticity error, especially at low S/N.

[ascl:2206.028] Spritz: General relativistic magnetohydrodynamic code

The Spritz code is a fully general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic code based on the Einstein Toolkit (ascl:1102.014). The code solves the GRMHD equations in 3D Cartesian coordinates and on a dynamical spacetime. Spritz supports tabulated equations of state, takes finite temperature effects into account and allows for the inclusion of neutrino radiation.

[ascl:2309.018] Sprout: Moving mesh finite volume hydro code

The finite volume hydro code Sprout uses a simple expanding Cartesian grid to track outflows for several orders of magnitudes in expansion. It captures shocks whether they are aligned or misaligned with the grid, and provides second-order convergence for smooth flows. The code's expanding mesh capability reduces numerical diffusion drastically for outflows, especially when the analytic nature of the bulk flow is known beforehand. Sprout can be used to study fluid instabilities in expanding flows, such as in SN explosions and jets; it resolves fine fluid structures at small length scales and expand the mesh gradually as the structures grow.

[ascl:1806.013] SpS: Single-pulse Searcher

The presence of human-made interference mimicking the behavior of celestial radio pulses is a major challenge when searching for radio pulses emitted on millisecond timescales by celestial radio sources such as pulsars and fast radio bursts due to the highly imbalanced samples. Single-pulse Searcher (SpS) reduces the presence of radio interference when processing standard output from radio single-pulse searches to produce diagnostic plots useful for selecting good candidates. The modular software allows modifications for specific search characteristics. LOTAAS Single-pulse Searcher (L-SpS) is an implementation of different features of the software (such as a machine-learning approach) developed for a particular study: the LOFAR Tied-Array All-Sky Survey (LOTAAS).

[ascl:1201.013] SPS: SPIRE Photometer Simulator

The SPS software simulates the operation of the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver on-board the ESA’s Herschel Space Observatory. It is coded using the Interactive Data Language (IDL), and produces simulated data at the level-0 stage (non-calibrated data in digitised units). The primary uses for the simulator are to:

  • optimize and characterize the photometer observing functions
  • aid in the development, validation, and characterization of the SPIRE data pipeline
  • provide a realistic example of SPIRE data, and thus to facilitate the development of specific analysis tools for specific science cases.
It should be noted that the SPS is not an officially supported product of the SPIRE ICC, and was originally developed for ICC use only. Consequently the SPS can be supported only on a "best efforts" basis.

[ascl:1411.025] SPT Lensing Likelihood: South Pole Telescope CMB lensing likelihood code

The SPT lensing likelihood code, written in Fortran90, performs a Gaussian likelihood based upon the lensing potential power spectrum using a file from CAMB (ascl:1102.026) which contains the normalization required to get the power spectrum that the likelihood call is expecting.

[ascl:1705.005] SPTCLASS: SPecTral CLASSificator code

SPTCLASS assigns semi-automatic spectral types to a sample of stars. The main code includes three spectral classification schemes: the first one is optimized to classify stars in the mass range of TTS (K5 or later, hereafter LATE-type scheme); the second one is optimized to classify stars in the mass range of IMTTS (F late to K early, hereafter Gtype scheme), and the third one is optimized to classify stars in the mass range of HAeBe (F5 or earlier, hereafter HAeBe scheme). SPTCLASS has an interactive module that allows the user to select the best result from the three schemes and analyze the input spectra.

[ascl:2406.002] SRF: Scaling Relations Finder

Scaling Relations Finder finds the scaling relations between magnetic field properties and observables for a model of galactic magnetic fields. It uses observable quantities as input: the galaxy rotation curve, the surface densities of the gas, stars and star formation rate, and the gas temperature to create galactic dynamo models. These models can be used to estimate parameters of the random and mean components of the magnetic field, as well as the gas scale height, root-mean-square velocity and the correlation length and time of the interstellar turbulence, in terms of the observables.

[ascl:1303.015] SSE: Single Star Evolution

SSE is a rapid single-star evolution (SSE) code; these analytical formulae cover all phases of evolution from the zero-age main-sequence up to and including remnant phases. It is valid for masses in the range 0.1-100 Msun and metallicity can be varied. The SSE package contains a prescription for mass loss by stellar winds. It also follows the evolution of rotational angular momentum for the star.

[ascl:2207.034] SSHT: Fast spin spherical harmonic transforms

SSHT performs fast and exact spin spherical harmonic transforms; functionality is also provided to perform fast and exact adjoint transforms, forward and inverse transforms, and spherical harmonic transforms for a number of alternative sampling schemes. The code can interface with DUCC (ascl:2008.023) and use it as a backend for spherical harmonic transforms and rotations.

[ascl:2008.007] sslf: A simple spectral-line finder

sslf is a simple, effective and useful spectral line finder for 1D data. It utilizes the continuous wavelet transform from SciPy, which is a productive way to find even weak spectral lines.

[ascl:1807.032] SSMM: Slotted Symbolic Markov Modeling for classifying variable star signatures

SSMM (Slotted Symbolic Markov Modeling) reduces time-domain stellar variable observations to classify stellar variables. The method can be applied to both folded and unfolded data, and does not require time-warping for waveform alignment. Written in Matlab, the performance of the supervised classification code is quantifiable and consistent, and the rate at which new data is processed is dependent only on the computational processing power available.

[ascl:1901.006] ssos: Solar system objects detection pipeline

The ssos pipeline detects and identifies known and unknown Solar System Objects (SSOs) in astronomical images. ssos requires at least 3 images with overlapping field-of-views in the sky taken within a reasonable amount of time (e.g., 2 hours, 1 night). SSOs are detected mainly by judging the apparent motion of all sources in the images. The pipeline serves as a wrapper for the SExtractor (ascl:1010.064) and SCAMP (ascl:1010.063) software suites and allows different source extraction strategies to be chosen. All sources in the images are subject to a highly configurable filter pipeline. ssos is a versatile, light-weight, and easy-to-use software for surveys or PI-observation campaigns lacking a dedicated SSO detection pipeline.

[ascl:2104.014] SSSpaNG: Stellar Spectra as Sparse Non-Gaussian Processes

SSSpaNG is a data-driven Gaussian Process model of the spectra of APOGEE red clump stars, whose parameters are inferred using Gibbs sampling. By pooling information between stars to infer their covariance it permits clear identification of the correlations between spectral pixels. Harnessing this correlation structure, a complete spectrum for each red clump star can be inferred, inpainting missing regions and de-noising by a factor of at least 2-3 for low-signal-to-noise stars.

[ascl:2306.008] sstrax: Fast stellar stream modelling in JAX

sstrax provides fast simulations of Milky Way stellar stream formation. Using JAX (ascl:2111.002) acceleration to support code compilation, sstrax forward models all aspects of stream formation, including evolution in gravitational potentials, tidal disruption and observational models, in a fully modular way. Although sstrax is a standalone python package, it was also developed to integrate directly with the Albatross (ascl:2306.009) inference pipeline, which performs inference on all relevant aspects of the stream model.

[ascl:1912.019] STACKER: Stack sources in interferometric data

STACKER stacks sources in interferometric data, i.e., averaging emission from different sources. The library allows stacking to be done directly on visibility data as well as in the image domain. The code is in format of a CASA (ascl:1107.013) task and implements uv- and image-stacking algorithms; it also provides several useful tasks for stacking related data processing. It allows introduction and stacking of random sources to estimate bias and noise, and also allows removal of a model of bright sources from the data.

[ascl:1105.012] Stagger: MHD Method for Modeling Star Formation

Stagger is an astrophysical MHD code actively used to model star formation. It is equipped with a multi-frequency radiative transfer module and a comprehensive equation of state module that includes a large number of atomic and molecular species, to be able to compute realistic 3-D models of the near-surface layers of stars. The current version of the code allows a discretization that explicitly conserves mass, momentum, energy, and magnetic flux. The tensor formulation of the viscosity ensures that the viscous force is insensitive to the coordinate system orientation, thereby avoiding artificial grid-alignment.

[ascl:1801.003] Stan: Statistical inference

Stan facilitates statistical inference at the frontiers of applied statistics and provides both a modeling language for specifying complex statistical models and a library of statistical algorithms for computing inferences with those models. These components are exposed through interfaces in environments such as R, Python, and the command line.

[ascl:2402.008] star_shadow: Analyze eclipsing binary light curves, find eccentricity, and more

star_shadow automatically analyzes space based light curves of eclipsing binaries and provide a measurement of eccentricity, among other parameters. It measures the timings of eclipses using the time derivatives of the light curves, using a model of orbital harmonics obtained from an initial iterative prewhitening of sinusoids. Since the algorithm extracts the harmonics from the rest of the sinusoidal variability eclipse timings can be measured even in the presence of other (astrophysical) signals, thus determining the orbital eccentricity automatically from the light curve along with information about the other variability present in the light curve. The output includes, but is not limited to, a sinusoid plus linear model of the light curve, the orbital period, the eccentricity, argument of periastron, and inclination.

[ascl:2109.012] STAR-MELT: STellar AccrRetion Mapping with Emission Line Tomography

STAR-MELT extracts and identifies emission lines from FITS files by matching to a compiled reference database of lines. Line profiles are fitted and quantified, allowing for calculations of physical properties across each individual observation. Temporal variations in lines can readily be displayed and quantified. STAR-MELT is also useful for different applications of spectral analysis where emission line identification is required. Standard data formats for spectra are automatically compatible, with user-defined custom formats also available. Any reference database (atomic or molecular) can also be used for line identification.

[ascl:1111.010] Starbase Data Tables: An ASCII Relational Database for Unix

Database management is an increasingly important part of astronomical data analysis. Astronomers need easy and convenient ways of storing, editing, filtering, and retrieving data about data. Commercial databases do not provide good solutions for many of the everyday and informal types of database access astronomers need. The Starbase database system with simple data file formatting rules and command line data operators has been created to answer this need. The system includes a complete set of relational and set operators, fast search/index and sorting operators, and many formatting and I/O operators. Special features are included to enhance the usefulness of the database when manipulating astronomical data. The software runs under UNIX, MSDOS and IRAF.

[ascl:1805.009] STARBLADE: STar and Artefact Removal with a Bayesian Lightweight Algorithm from Diffuse Emission

STARBLADE (STar and Artefact Removal with a Bayesian Lightweight Algorithm from Diffuse Emission) separates superimposed point-like sources from a diffuse background by imposing physically motivated models as prior knowledge. The algorithm can also be used on noisy and convolved data, though performing a proper reconstruction including a deconvolution prior to the application of the algorithm is advised; the algorithm could also be used within a denoising imaging method. STARBLADE learns the correlation structure of the diffuse emission and takes it into account to determine the occurrence and strength of a superimposed point source.

[ascl:2309.012] StarbugII: JWST PSF photometry for crowded fields

The python photometry suite StarbugII provides accurate photometry on point-like sources embedded in complex diffuse emissions. The tool has a simple modular interface with a wide range of photometric routines including embedded source detection, aperture and PSF photometry, diffuse background emission estimation, catalog matching and artificial star testing. The core is built around Photutils (ascl:1609.011).

[ascl:1104.003] Starburst99: Synthesis Models for Galaxies with Active Star Formation

Starburst99 is a comprehensive set of model predictions for spectrophotometric and related properties of galaxies with active star formation. The models are presented in a homogeneous way for five metallicities between Z = 0.040 and 0.001 and three choices of the initial mass function. The age coverage is 10^6 to 10^9 yr. Spectral energy distributions are used to compute colors and other quantities.

[submitted] StarburstPy: Python Wrapper for Starburst99

StarburstPy is a python wrapper for Starburst99 (ascl:1104.003). The code contains methods for setting all inputs, running Starburst99, and reading output data into python dictionaries.

[ascl:2106.012] StarcNet: Convolutional neural network for classifying galaxy images into morphological classes

StarcNet (STAR Cluster classification NETwork) classifies star clusters from galaxy images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST); it uses a convolutional neural network (CNN) trained to classify five-band galaxy images into four morphological classes. Written in PyTorch, StarcNet runs using mosaics (.fits files with the galaxy photometric information) and catalogs (.tab files with object coordinates), and includes the option to also download the galaxy mosaics from a single .tar.gz file per galaxy (as from the Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey).

[ascl:1010.074] StarCrash: 3-d Evolution of Self-gravitating Fluid Systems

StarCrash is a parallel fortran code based on Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) techniques to calculate the 3-d evolution of self-gravitating fluid systems. The code in particularly suited to the study of stellar interactions, such as mergers of binary star systems and stellar collisions. The StarCrash code comes with several important features, including:

  • Several routines which construct the initial conditions appropriate to a wide variety of physical systems
  • An efficient parallel neighbor-finding algorithm for calculating hydrodynamic quantities
  • A parallel gravitational field solver based on FFT convolution techniques, which uses the FFTW software libraries
  • Relaxation Techniques for single stars and synchronized binaries
  • Three different artificial viscosity treatments to calculate the thermodynamic evolution of the matter
  • An optional gravitational radiation back-reaction treatment, which calculates the damping force from gravity wave losses to lowest relativistic order in a spatially accurate way

[ascl:2004.009] stardate: Measure precise stellar ages

stardate measures precise stellar ages by combining isochrone fitting with gyrochronology (rotation-based ages) to increase the precision of stellar ages on the main sequence. The best possible ages provided by stardate will be for stars with rotation periods, though ages can also be predicted for stars without rotation periods. stardate is an extension to isochrones that incorporates gyrochronology and the code reverts back to isochrones when no rotation period is provided.

[ascl:2202.023] Starduster: Radiative transfer and deep learning multi-wavelength SED model

The deep learning model Starduster emulates dust radiative transfer simulations, which significantly accelerates the computation of dust attenuation and emission. Starduster contains two specific generative models, which explicitly take into account the features of the dust attenuation curves and dust emission spectra. Both generative models should be trained by a set of characteristic outputs of a radiative transfer simulation. The obtained neural networks can produce realistic galaxy spectral energy distributions that satisfy the energy balance condition of dust attenuation and emission. Applications of Starduster include SED-fitting and SED-modeling from semi-analytic models.

[ascl:0011.001] StarFinder: A code for stellar field analysis

StarFinder is an IDL code for the deep analysis of stellar fields, designed for Adaptive Optics well-sampled images with high and low Strehl ratio. The Point Spread Function is extracted directly from the frame, to take into account the actual structure of the instrumental response and the atmospheric effects. The code is written in IDL language and organized in the form of a self-contained widget-based application, provided with a series of tools for data visualization and analysis. A description of the method and some applications to Adaptive Optics data are presented.

[ascl:1204.008] StarFISH: For Inferring Star-formation Histories

StarFISH is a suite of programs designed to determine the star formation history (SFH) of a stellar population, given multicolor stellar photometry and a library of theoretical isochrones. It constructs a library of synthetic color-magnitude diagrams from the isochrones, which includes the effects of extinction, photometric errors and completeness, and binarity. A minimization routine is then used to determine the linear combination of synthetic CMDs that best matches the observed photometry. The set of amplitudes modulating each synthetic CMD describes the star formation history of the observed stellar population.

[ascl:1505.007] Starfish: Robust spectroscopic inference tools

Starfish is a set of tools used for spectroscopic inference. It robustly determines stellar parameters using high resolution spectral models and uses Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) to explore the full posterior probability distribution of the stellar parameters. Additional potential applications include other types of spectra, such as unresolved stellar clusters or supernovae spectra.

[ascl:1010.076] Starlab: A Software Environment for Collisional Stellar Dynamics

Traditionally, a simulation of a dense stellar system required choosing an initial model, running an integrator, and analyzing the output. Almost all of the effort went into writing a clever integrator that could handle binaries, triples and encounters between various multiple systems efficiently. Recently, the scope and complexity of these simulations has increased dramatically, for three reasons: 1) the sheer size of the data sets, measured in Terabytes, make traditional 'awking and grepping' of a single output file impractical; 2) the addition of stellar evolution data brings qualitatively new challenges to the data reduction; 3) increased realism of the simulations invites realistic forms of 'SOS': Simulations of Observations of Simulations, to be compared directly with observations. We are now witnessing a shift toward the construction of archives as well as tailored forms of visualization including the use of virtual reality simulators and planetarium domes, and a coupling of both with budding efforts in constructing virtual observatories. This review describes these new trends, presenting Starlab as the first example of a full software environment for realistic large-scale simulations of dense stellar systems.

[ascl:1108.006] STARLIGHT: Spectral Synthesis Code

The study of stellar populations in galaxies is entering a new era with the availability of large and high quality databases of both observed galactic spectra and state-of-the-art evolutionary synthesis models. The power of spectral synthesis can be investigated as a mean to estimate physical properties of galaxies. Spectral synthesis is nothing more than the decomposition of an observed spectrum in terms of a superposition of a base of simple stellar populations of various ages and metallicities, producing astrophysically interesting output such as the star-formation and chemical enrichment histories of a galaxy, its extinction and velocity dispersion. This is what the STARLIGHT spectral synthesis code does.

[ascl:1411.022] Starlink Figaro: Starlink version of the Figaro data reduction software package

Starlink Figaro is an independently-maintained fork of Figaro (ascl:1203.013) that runs in the Starlink software environment (ascl:1110.012). It is a general-purpose data reduction package targeted mainly at optical/IR spectroscopy. It uses the NDF data format and the ADAM libraries for parameters and messaging.

[ascl:1110.012] Starlink: Multi-purpose Astronomy Software

Starlink has many applications within it to meet a variety of needs; it includes:

  • a general astronomical image viewer;
  • data reduction tools, including programs for reducing CCD-like data;
  • general-purpose data-analysis and visualisation tools;
  • image processing, data visualisation, and manipulating NDF components;
  • a flexible and powerful library for handling World Coordinate Systems (partly based on the SLALIB library);
  • a library of routines intended to make accurate and reliable positional-astronomy applications easier to write; and
  • and a Hierarchical Data System that is portable and flexible for storing and retrieving data.

[ascl:1406.020] STARMAN: Stellar photometry and image/table handling

STARMAN is a stellar photometry package designed for the reduction of data from imaging systems. Its main components are crowded-field photometry programs, aperture photometry programs, a star finding program, and a CCD reduction program.

Image and table handling are served by a large number of programs which have a general use in photometry and other types of work. The package is a coherent whole, for use in the entire process of stellar photometry from raw images to the final standard-system magnitudes and their plotting as color-magnitude and color-color diagrams. It was distributed as part of the Starlink software collection (ascl:1110.012).

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