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Results 1751-2000 of 3449 (3361 ASCL, 88 submitted)

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[ascl:1303.009] MAGIX: Modeling and Analysis Generic Interface for eXternal numerical codes

MAGIX provides an interface between existing codes and an iterating engine that minimizes deviations of the model results from available observational data; it constrains the values of the model parameters and provides corresponding error estimates. Many models (and, in principle, not only astrophysical models) can be plugged into MAGIX to explore their parameter space and find the set of parameter values that best fits observational/experimental data. MAGIX complies with the data structures and reduction tools of Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), but can be used with other astronomical and with non-astronomical data.

[ascl:2003.002] MAGNETAR: Histogram of relative orientation calculator for MHD observations

MAGNETAR is a set of tools for the study of the magnetic field in simulations of MHD turbulence and polarization observations. It calculates the histogram of relative orientation between density structure in the magnetic field in data cubes from simulations of MHD turbulence and observations of polarization using the method of histogram of relative orientations (HRO).

[ascl:1010.054] MagnetiCS.c: Cosmic String Loop Evolution and Magnetogenesis

Large-scale coherent magnetic fields are observed in galaxies and clusters, but their ultimate origin remains a mystery. We reconsider the prospects for primordial magnetogenesis by a cosmic string network. We show that the magnetic flux produced by long strings has been overestimated in the past, and give improved estimates. We also compute the fields created by the loop population, and find that it gives the dominant contribution to the total magnetic field strength on present-day galactic scales. We present numerical results obtained by evolving semi-analytic models of string networks (including both one-scale and velocity-dependent one-scale models) in a Lambda-CDM cosmology, including the forces and torques on loops from Hubble redshifting, dynamical friction, and gravitational wave emission. Our predictions include the magnetic field strength as a function of correlation length, as well as the volume covered by magnetic fields. We conclude that string networks could account for magnetic fields on galactic scales, but only if coupled with an efficient dynamo amplification mechanism.

[ascl:2008.011] Magnetizer: Computing magnetic fields of evolving galaxies

Magnetizer computes time and radial dependent magnetic fields for a sample of galaxies in the output of a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. The magnetic field is obtained by numerically solving the galactic dynamo equations throughout history of each galaxy. Stokes parameters and Faraday rotation measure can also be computed along a random line-of-sight for each galaxy.

[ascl:1502.014] Magnetron: Fitting bursts from magnetars

Magnetron, written in Python, decomposes magnetar bursts into a superposition of small spike-like features with a simple functional form, where the number of model components is itself part of the inference problem. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling and reversible jumps between models with different numbers of parameters are used to characterize the posterior distributions of the model parameters and the number of components per burst.

[ascl:1106.010] MAGPHYS: Multi-wavelength Analysis of Galaxy Physical Properties

MAGPHYS is a self-contained, user-friendly model package to interpret observed spectral energy distributions of galaxies in terms of galaxy-wide physical parameters pertaining to the stars and the interstellar medium. MAGPHYS is optimized to derive statistical constraints of fundamental parameters related to star formation activity and dust content (e.g. star formation rate, stellar mass, dust attenuation, dust temperatures) of large samples of galaxies using a wide range of multi-wavelength observations. A Bayesian approach is used to interpret the SEDs all the way from the ultraviolet/optical to the far-infrared.

[ascl:2310.006] MAGPy-RV: Gaussian Process regression pipeline with MCMC parameter searching

MAGPy-RV (Modelling stellar Activity with Gaussian Processes in Radial Velocity) models data with Gaussian Process regression and affine invariant Monte Carlo Markov Chain parameter searching. Developed to model intrinsic, quasi-periodic variations induced by the host star in radial velocity (RV) surveys for the detection of exoplanets and the accurate measurements of their orbital parameters and masses, it now includes a variety of kernels and models and can be applied to any timeseries analysis. MAGPy-RV includes publication level plotting, efficient posterior extraction, and export-ready LaTeX results tables. It also handles multiple datasets at once and can model offsets and systematics from multiple instruments. MAGPy-RV requires no external dependencies besides basic python libraries and corner (ascl:1702.002).

[ascl:2203.024] Magrathea-Pathfinder: 3D AMR ray-tracing in simulations

Magrathea-Pathfinder propagates photons within cosmological simulations to construct observables. This high-performance framework uses a 3D Adaptive-Mesh Refinement and is built on top of the MAGRATHEA metalibrary (ascl:2203.023).

[ascl:2203.023] MAGRATHEA: Multi-processor Adaptive Grid Refinement Analysis for THEoretical Astrophysics

MAGRATHEA (Multi-processor Adaptive Grid Refinement Analysis for THEoretical Astrophysics) is a foundational cosmological library and a relativistic raytracing code. Classical linear algebra libraries come with their own operations and can be difficult to leverage for new data types. Instead of providing basic types, MAGRATHEA provides tools to generate base types such as scalar quantities, points, vectors, or tensors.

[ascl:2201.012] MAGRATHEA: Planet interior structure code

MAGRATHEA solves planet interiors and considers the case of fully differentiated interiors. The code integrates the hydrostatic equation in order to determine the correct planet radius given the mass in each layer. The code returns the pressure, temperature, density, phase, and radius at steps of enclosed mass. The code support four layers: core, mantle, hydrosphere, and atmosphere. Each layer has a phase diagram with equations of state chosen for each phase.

[ascl:2012.025] Magritte: 3D radiative transfer library

Magritte performs 3D radiative transfer modeling; though focused on astrophysics and cosmology, the techniques can also be applied more generally. The code uses a deterministic ray-tracer with a formal solver that currently focuses on line radiative transfer. Magritte can either be used as a C++ library or as a Python package.

[ascl:1307.009] MAH: Minimum Atmospheric Height

MAH calculates the posterior distribution of the "minimum atmospheric height" (MAH) of an exoplanet by inputting the joint posterior distribution of the mass and radius. The code collapses the two dimensions of mass and radius into a one dimensional term that most directly speaks to whether the planet has an atmosphere or not. The joint mass-radius posteriors derived from a fit of some exoplanet data (likely using MCMC) can be used by MAH to evaluate the posterior distribution of R_MAH, from which the significance of a non-zero R_MAH (i.e. an atmosphere is present) is calculated.

[ascl:2106.011] MakeCloud: Turbulent GMC initial conditions for GIZMO

MakeCloud makes turbulent giant molecular cloud (GMC) initial conditions for GIZMO (ascl:1410.003). It generates turbulent velocity fields on the fly and stores that data in a user-specified path for efficiency. The code is flexible, allowing the user control through various parameters, including the radius of the cloud, number of gas particles, type of initial turbulent velocity (Gaussian or full), and magnetic energy as a fraction of the binding energy, among other options. With an additional file, it can also create glassy initial conditions.

[ascl:1502.021] MaLTPyNT: Quick look timing analysis for NuSTAR data

MaLTPyNT (Matteo's Libraries and Tools in Python for NuSTAR Timing) provides a quick-look timing analysis of NuSTAR data, properly treating orbital gaps and exploiting the presence of two independent detectors by using the cospectrum as a proxy for the power density spectrum. The output of the analysis is a cospectrum, or a power density spectrum, that can be fitted with XSPEC (ascl:9910.005) or ISIS (ascl:1302.002). The software also calculates time lags. Though written for NuSTAR data, MaLTPyNT can also perform standard spectral analysis on X-ray data from other satellite such as XMM-Newton and RXTE.

[submitted] MALU IFS visualisation tool

MALU visualizes integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data such as CALIFA, MANGA, SAMI or MUSE data producing fully interactive plots. The tool is not specific to any instrument. It is available in Python and no installation is required.

[ascl:2203.020] MAMPOSSt: Mass/orbit modeling of spherical systems

MAMPOSSt (Modeling Anisotropy and Mass Profiles of Observed Spherical Systems) is a Bayesian code to perform mass/orbit modeling of spherical systems. It determines marginal parameter distributions and parameter covariances of parametrized radial distributions of dark or total matter, as well as the mass of a possible central black hole, and the radial profiles of density and velocity anisotropy of one or several tracer components, all of which are jointly fit to the discrete data in projected phase space. It is based upon the MAMPOSSt likelihood function for the distribution of individual tracers in projected phase space (projected radius and line-of-sight velocity) and the CosmoMC Markov Chain Monte Carlo code (ascl:1106.025), run in generic mode. MAMPOSSt is not based on the 6D distribution function (which would require triple integrals), but on the assumption that the local 3D velocity distribution is an (anisotropic) Gaussian (requiring only a single integral).

[ascl:2106.010] Maneage: Managing data lineage

The Maneage (Managing data lineage; ending pronounced like "lineage") framework produces fully reproducible computational research. It provides full control on building the necessary software environment from a low-level C compiler, the shell and LaTeX, all the way up to the high-level science software in languages such as Python without a third-party package manager. Once the software environment is built, adding analysis steps is as easy as defining "Make" rules to allow parallelized operations, and not repeating operations that do not need to be recreated. Make provides control over data provenance. A Maneage'd project also contains the narrative description of the project in LaTeX, which helps prepare the research for publication. All results from the analysis are passed into the report through LaTeX macros, allowing immediate dynamic updates to the PDF paper when any part of the analysis has changed. All information is stored in plain text and is version-controlled in Git. Maneage itself is actually a Git branch; new projects start by defining a new Git branch over it and customizing it for a new project. Through Git merging of branches, it is possible to import infrastructure updates to projects.

[ascl:2203.017] MaNGA-DAP: MaNGA Data Analysis Pipeline

The MaNGA data analysis pipeline (MaNGA DAP) analyzes the data produced by the MaNGA data-reduction pipeline (ascl:2203.016) to produced physical properties derived from the MaNGA spectroscopy. All survey-provided properties are currently derived from the log-linear binned datacubes (i.e., the LOGCUBE files).

[ascl:2203.016] MaNGA-DRP: MaNGA Data Reduction Pipeline

The MaNGA Data Reduction Pipeline (DRP) processes the raw data to produce flux calibrated, sky subtracted, coadded data cubes from each of the individual exposures for a given galaxy. The DRP consists of two primary parts: the 2d stage that produces flux calibrated fiber spectra from raw individual exposures, and the 3d stage that combines multiple flux calibrated exposures with astrometric information to produce stacked data cubes. These science-grade data cubes are then processed by the MaNGA Data Analysis Pipeline (ascl:2203.017), which measures the shape and location of various spectral features, fits stellar population models, and performs a variety of other analyses necessary to derive astrophysically meaningful quantities from the calibrated data cubes.

[ascl:1202.005] Mangle: Angular Mask Software

Mangle deals accurately and efficiently with complex angular masks, such as occur typically in galaxy surveys. Mangle performs the following tasks: converts masks between many handy formats (including HEALPix); rapidly finds the polygons containing a given point on the sphere; rapidly decomposes a set of polygons into disjoint parts; expands masks in spherical harmonics; generates random points with weights given by the mask; and implements computations for correlation function analysis. To mangle, a mask is an arbitrary union of arbitrarily weighted angular regions bounded by arbitrary numbers of edges. The restrictions on the mask are only (1) that each edge must be part of some circle on the sphere (but not necessarily a great circle), and (2) that the weight within each subregion of the mask must be constant. Mangle is complementary to and integrated with the HEALPix package (ascl:1107.018); mangle works with vector graphics whereas HEALPix works with pixels.

[ascl:2306.015] Mangrove: Infer galaxy properties using dark matter merger trees

Mangrove uses Graph Neural Networks to regress baryonic properties directly from full dark matter merger trees to infer galaxy properties. The package includes code for preprocessing the merger tree, and training the model can be done either as single experiments or as a sweep. Mangrove provides loss functions, learning rate schedulers, models, and a script for doing the training on a GPU.

[ascl:1305.012] MapCUMBA: Multi-grid map-making algorithm for CMB experiments

The MapCUMBA package applies a multigrid fast iterative Jacobi algorithm for map-making in the context of CMB experiments.

[ascl:1308.003] MapCurvature: Map Projections

MapCurvature, written in IDL, can create map projections with Goldberg-Gott indicatrices. These indicatrices measure the flexion and skewness of a map, and are useful for determining whether features are faithfully reproduced on a particular projection.

[ascl:1306.008] MAPPINGS III: Modelling And Prediction in PhotoIonized Nebulae and Gasdynamical Shocks

MAPPINGS III is a general purpose astrophysical plasma modelling code. It is principally intended to predict emission line spectra of medium and low density plasmas subjected to different levels of photoionization and ionization by shockwaves. MAPPINGS III tracks up to 16 atomic species in all stages of ionization, over a useful range of 102 to 108 K. It treats spherical and plane parallel geometries in equilibrium and time-dependent models. MAPPINGS III is useful for computing models of HI and HII regions, planetary nebulae, novae, supernova remnants, Herbig-Haro shocks, active galaxies, the intergalactic medium and the interstellar medium in general. The present version of MAPPINGS III is a large FORTRAN program that runs with a simple TTY interface for historical and portability reasons. A newer version of this software, MAPPINGS V (ascl:1807.005), is available.

[ascl:1807.005] MAPPINGS V: Astrophysical plasma modeling code

MAPPINGS V is a update of the MAPPINGS code (ascl:1306.008) and provides new cooling function computations for optically thin plasmas based on the greatly expanded atomic data of the CHIANTI 8 database. The number of cooling and recombination lines has been expanded from ~2000 to over 80,000, and temperature-dependent spline-based collisional data have been adopted for the majority of transitions. The expanded atomic data set provides improved modeling of both thermally ionized and photoionized plasmas; the code is now capable of predicting detailed X-ray spectra of nonequilibrium plasmas over the full nonrelativistic temperature range, increasing its utility in cosmological simulations, in modeling cooling flows, and in generating accurate models for the X-ray emission from shocks in supernova remnants.

[ascl:2108.003] MAPS: Multi-frequency Angular Power Spectrum estimator

MAPS (Multi-frequency Angular Power Spectrum) extracts two-point statistical information from Epoch of Reionization (EoR) signals observed in three dimensions, with two directions on the sky and the wavelength (or frequency) constituting the third dimension. Rather than assume that the signal has the same statistical properties in all three directions, as the spherically averaged power spectrum (SAPS) does, MAPS does not make these assumptions, making it more natural for radio interferometric observations than SAPS.

[ascl:2306.011] margarine: Posterior sampling and marginal Bayesian statistics

Margarine computes marginal bayesian statistics given a set of samples from an MCMC or nested sampling run. Specifically, the code calculates marginal Kullback-Leibler divergences and Bayesian dimensionalities using Masked Autoregressive Flows and Kernel Density Estimators to learn and sample posterior distributions of signal subspaces in high dimensional data models, and determines the properties of cosmological subspaces, such as their log-probability densities and how well constrained they are, independent of nuisance parameters. Margarine thus allows for direct and specific comparison of the constraining ability of different experimental approaches, which can in turn lead to improvements in experimental design.

[ascl:2003.010] MARGE: Machine learning Algorithm for Radiative transfer of Generated Exoplanets

MARGE (Machine learning Algorithm for Radiative transfer of Generated Exoplanets) generates exoplanet spectra across a defined parameter space, processes the output, and trains, validates, and tests machine learning models as a fast approximation to radiative transfer. It uses BART (ascl:1608.004) for spectra generation and modifies BART’s Bayesian sampler (MC3, ascl:1610.013) with a random uniform sampler to propose models within a defined parameter space. More generally, MARGE provides a framework for training neural network models to approximate a forward, deterministic process.

[ascl:1011.004] MARS: The MAGIC Analysis and Reconstruction Software

With the commissioning of the second MAGIC gamma-ray Cherenkov telescope situated close to MAGIC-I, the standard analysis package of the MAGIC collaboration, MARS, has been upgraded in order to perform the stereoscopic reconstruction of the detected atmospheric showers. MARS is a ROOT-based code written in C++, which includes all the necessary algorithms to transform the raw data recorded by the telescopes into information about the physics parameters of the observed targets. An overview of the methods for extracting the basic shower parameters is presented, together with a description of the tools used in the background discrimination and in the estimation of the gamma-ray source spectra.

[ascl:1910.015] MarsLux: Illumination Mars maps generator

MarsLux generates illumination maps of Mars from Digital Terrain Model (DTM), permitting users to investigate in detail the illumination conditions on Mars based on its topography and the relative position of the Sun. MarsLux consists of two Python codes, SolaPar and MarsLux. SolaPar calculates the matrix with solar parameters for one date or a range between the two. The Marslux code generates the illumination maps using the same DTM and the files generated by SolaPar. The resulting illumination maps show areas that are fully illuminated, areas in total shadow, and areas with partial shade, and can be used for geomorphological studies to examine gullies, thermal weathering, or mass wasting processes as well as for producing energy budget maps for future exploration missions.

[ascl:1911.005] MARTINI: Mock spatially resolved spectral line observations of simulated galaxies

MARTINI (Mock APERTIF-like Radio Telescope Interferometry of the Neutal ISM) creates synthetic resolved HI line observations (data cubes) of smoothed-particle hydrodynamics simulations of galaxies. The various aspects of the mock-observing process are divided logically into sub-modules handling the data cube, source, beam, noise, spectral model and SPH kernel. MARTINI is object-oriented: each sub-module provides a class (or classes) which can be configured as desired. For most sub-modules, base classes are provided to allow for straightforward customization. Instances of each sub-module class are then given as parameters to the Martini class. A mock observation is then constructed by calling a handful of functions to execute the desired steps in the mock-observing process.

[ascl:2106.005] Marvin: Data access and visualization for MaNGA

Marvin searches, accesses, and visualizes data from the Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey. Written in Python, it provides tools for easy efficient interaction with the MaNGA data via local files, files retrieved from the Science Archive Server, or data directly grabbed from the database. The tools come mainly in the form of convenience functions and classes for interacting with the data. Also available is a web app, Marvin-web, offers an easily accessible interface for searching the MaNGA data and visual exploration of individual MaNGA galaxies or of the entire sample, and a powerful query functionality that uses the API to query the MaNGA databases and return the search results to your python session. Marvin-API is the critical link that allows Marvin-tools and Marvin-web to interact with the databases, which enables users to harness the statistical power of the MaNGA data set.

[ascl:1302.001] MARX: Model of AXAF Response to X-rays

MARX (Model of AXAF Response to X-rays) is a suite of programs designed to enable the user to simulate the on-orbit performance of the Chandra satellite. MARX provides a detailed ray-trace simulation of how Chandra responds to a variety of astrophysical sources and can generate standard FITS events files and images as output. It contains models for the HRMA mirror system onboard Chandra as well as the HETG and LETG gratings and all focal plane detectors.

[ascl:1711.020] MARXS: Multi-Architecture Raytrace Xray mission Simulator

MARXS (Multi-Architecture-Raytrace-Xraymission-Simulator) simulates X-ray observatories. Primarily designed to simulate X-ray instruments on astronomical X-ray satellites and sounding rocket payloads, it can also be used to ray-trace experiments in the laboratory. MARXS performs polarization Monte-Carlo ray-trace simulations from a source (astronomical or lab) through a collection of optical elements such as mirrors, baffles, and gratings to a detector.

[ascl:1605.001] MARZ: Redshifting Program

MARZ analyzes objects and produces high quality spectroscopic redshift measurements. Spectra not matched correctly by the automatic algorithm can be redshifted manually by cycling automatic results, manual template comparison, or marking spectral features. The software has an intuitive interface and powerful automatic matching capabilities on spectra, and can be run interactively or from the command line, and runs as a Web application. MARZ can be run on a local server; it is also available for use on a public server.

[ascl:2101.007] Mask galaxy: Machine learning pipeline for morphological segmentation of galaxies

Mask galaxy is an automatic machine learning pipeline for detection, segmentation and morphological classification of galaxies. The model is based on the Mask R-CNN Deep Learning architecture. This model of instance segmentation also performs image segmentation at the pixel level, and has shown a Mean Average Precision (mAP) of 0.93 in morphological classification of spiral or elliptical galaxies.

[ascl:2401.015] maskfill: Fill in masked values in an image

maskfill inward extrapolates edge pixels just outside masked regions, using iterative median filtering and the full information contained in the edge pixels. This provides seamless transitions between masked pixels and good pixels, and allows high fidelity reconstruction of gaps in continuous narrow features. An image and a mask the only required inputs.

[ascl:1101.009] MasQU: Finite Differences on Masked Irregular Stokes Q,U Grids

MasQU extracts polarization information in the CMB by reducing contamination from so-called "ambiguous modes" on a masked sky, which contain leakage from the larger E-mode signal and utilizing derivative operators on the real-space Stokes Q and U parameters. In particular, the package can perform finite differences on masked, irregular grids and is applied to a semi-regular spherical pixellization, the HEALPix grid. The formalism reduces to the known finite-difference solutions in the case of a regular grid. On a masked sphere, the software represents a considerable reduction in B-mode noise from limited sky coverage.

[ascl:1104.004] MASSCLEAN: MASSive CLuster Evolution and ANalysis Package

MASSCLEAN is a sophisticated and robust stellar cluster image and photometry simulation package. This package is able to create color-magnitude diagrams and standard FITS images in any of the traditional optical and near-infrared bands based on cluster characteristics input by the user, including but not limited to distance, age, mass, radius and extinction. At the limit of very distant, unresolved clusters, we have checked the integrated colors created in MASSCLEAN against those from other simple stellar population (SSP) models with consistent results. Because the algorithm populates the cluster with a discrete number of tenable stars, it can be used as part of a Monte Carlo Method to derive the probabilistic range of characteristics (integrated colors, for example) consistent with a given cluster mass and age.

[ascl:1401.008] massconvert: Halo Mass Conversion

massconvert, written in Fortran, provides driver and fitting routines for converting halo mass definitions from one spherical overdensity to another assuming an NFW density profile. In surveys that probe ever lower cluster masses and temperatures, sample variance is generally comparable to or greater than shot noise and thus cannot be neglected in deriving precision cosmological constraints; massconvert offers an accurate fitting formula for the conversion between different definitions of halo mass.

[ascl:2207.035] massmappy: Mapping dark matter on the celestial sphere

massmappy recovers convergence mass maps on the celestial sphere from weak lensing cosmic shear observations. It relies on SSHT (ascl:2207.034) and HEALPix (ascl:1107.018) to handle sampled data on the sphere. The spherical Kaiser-Squires estimator is implemented.

[ascl:2309.013] maszcal: Mass calibrations for thermal-SZ clusters

maszcal calibrates the observable-mass relation for galaxy clusters, with a focus on the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich signal's relation to mass. maszcal explicitly models baryonic matter density profiles, differing from most previous approaches that treat galaxy clusters as purely dark matter. To do this, it uses a generalized Nararro-Frenk-White (GNFW) density to represent the baryons, while using the more typical NFW profile to represent dark matter.

[ascl:1406.010] MATCH: A program for matching star lists

MATCH matches up items in two different lists, which can have two different systems of coordinates. The program allows the two sets of coordinates to be related by a linear, quadratic, or cubic transformation. MATCH was designed and written to work on lists of stars and other astronomical objects but can be applied to other types of data. In order to match two lists of N points, the main algorithm calls for O(N^6) operations; though not the most efficient choice, it does allow for arbitrary translation, rotation, and scaling.

[ascl:1601.018] MATPHOT: Stellar photometry and astrometry with discrete point spread functions

A discrete Point Spread Function (PSF) is a sampled version of a continuous two-dimensional PSF. The shape information about the photon scattering pattern of a discrete PSF is typically encoded using a numerical table (matrix) or a FITS image file. MATPHOT shifts discrete PSFs within an observational model using a 21-pixel- wide damped sinc function and position partial derivatives are computed using a five-point numerical differentiation formula. MATPHOT achieves accurate and precise stellar photometry and astrometry of undersampled CCD observations by using supersampled discrete PSFs that are sampled two, three, or more times more finely than the observational data.

[ascl:2309.007] MATRIX: Multi-phAse Transits Recovery from Injected eXoplanets toolkit

The injection-recovery MATRIX (Multi-phAse Transits Recovery from Injected eXoplanets) Toolkit creates grids of scenarios with a set of periods, radii, and epochs of synthetic transiting exoplanet signals in a provided light curve. Typical injection-recovery executions consist of 2-dimensional scenarios, where only one epoch (random or hardcoded) was used for each period and radius, which may reduce accuracy. MATRIX performs multi-phase analyses needing only a few parameters in a configuration file and running one line of code.

[ascl:2312.030] matvis: Fast matrix-based visibility simulator
Kittiwisit, Piyanat; Murray, Steven G.; Garsden, Hugh; Bull, Philip; Cain, Christopher; Parsons, Aaron R.; Sipple, Jackson; Abdurashidova, Zara; Adams, Tyrone; Aguirre, James E.; Alexander, Paul; Ali, Zaki S.; Baartman, Rushelle; Balfour, Yanga; Beardsley, Adam P.; Berkhout, Lindsay M.; Bernardi, Gianni; Billings, Tashalee S.; Bowman, Judd D.; Bradley, Richard F.; Burba, Jacob; Carey, Steven; Carilli, Chris L.; Chen, Kai-Feng; Cheng, Carina; Choudhuri, Samir; DeBoer, David R.; de Lera Acedo, Eloy; Dexter, Matt; Dillon, Joshua S.; Dynes, Scott; Eksteen, Nico; Ely, John; Ewall-Wice, Aaron; Fagnoni, Nicolas; Fritz, Randall; Furlanetto, Steven R.; Gale-Sides, Kingsley; Gehlot, Bharat Kumar; Ghosh, Abhik; Glendenning, Brian; Gorce, Adelie; Gorthi, Deepthi; Greig, Bradley; Grobbelaar, Jasper; Halday, Ziyaad; Hazelton, Bryna J.; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; Hickish, Jack; Huang, Tian; Jacobs, Daniel C.; Josaitis, Alec; Julius, Austin; Kariseb, MacCalvin; Kern, Nicholas S.; Kerrigan, Joshua; Kim, Honggeun; Kohn, Saul A.; Kolopanis, Matthew; Lanman, Adam; La Plante, Paul; Liu, Adrian; Loots, Anita; Ma, Yin-Zhe; MacMahon, David H. E.; Malan, Lourence; Malgas, Cresshim; Malgas, Keith; Marero, Bradley; Martinot, Zachary E.; Mesinger, Andrei; Molewa, Mathakane; Morales, Miguel F.; Mosiane, Tshegofalang; Neben, Abraham R.; Nikolic, Bojan; Devi Nunhokee, Chuneeta; Nuwegeld, Hans; Pascua, Robert; Patra, Nipanjana; Pieterse, Samantha; Qin, Yuxiang; Rath, Eleanor; Razavi-Ghods, Nima; Riley, Daniel; Robnett, James; Rosie, Kathryn; Santos, Mario G.; Sims, Peter; Singh, Saurabh; Storer, Dara; Swarts, Hilton; Tan, Jianrong; Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; van Wyngaarden, Pieter; Williams, Peter K. G.; Xu, Zhilei; Zheng, Haoxuan

matvis simulates radio interferometric visibilities at the necessary scale with both CPU and GPU implementations. It is matrix-based and applicable to wide field-of-view instruments such as the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) and the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), as it does not make any approximations of the visibility integral (such as the flat-sky approximation). The only approximation made is that the sky is a collection of point sources, which is valid for sky models that intrinsically consist of point-sources, but is an approximation for diffuse sky models. The matvix matrix-based algorithm is fast and scales well to large numbers of antennas. The code supports both CPU and GPU implementations as drop-in replacements for each other and also supports both dense and sparse sky models.

[ascl:2008.018] maxsmooth: Derivative constrained function fitting

maxsmooth fits derivative constrained functions (DCF) such as Maximally Smooth Functions (MSFs) to data sets. MSFs are functions for which there are no zero crossings in derivatives of order m >= 2 within the domain of interest. They are designed to prevent the loss of signals when fitting out dominant smooth foregrounds or large magnitude signals that mask signals of interest. Here "smooth" means that the foregrounds follow power law structures and do not feature turning points in the band of interest. maxsmooth uses quadratic programming implemented with CVXOPT (ascl:2008.017) to fit data subject to a fixed linear constraint, Ga <= 0, where the product Ga is a matrix of derivatives. The code tests the <= 0 constraint multiplied by a positive or negative sign and can test every available sign combination but by default, it implements a sign navigating algorithm.

[ascl:1205.008] Mayavi2: 3D Scientific Data Visualization and Plotting

Mayavi provides general-purpose 3D scientific visualizations. It offers easy interactive tools for data visualization that fit with the scientific user's workflow. Mayavi provides several entry points: a full-blown interactive application; a Python library with both a MATLAB-like interface focused on easy scripting and a feature-rich object hierarchy; widgets associated with these objects for assembling in a domain-specific application, and plugins that work with a general purpose application-building framework.

[ascl:2204.009] MAYONNAISE: ADI data imaging processing pipeline

MAYONNAISE (Morphological Analysis Yielding separated Objects iN Near infrAred usIng Sources Estimation), or MAYO for short, is a pipeline for exoplanet and disk high-contrast imaging from ADI datasets. The pipeline is mostly automated; the package also loads the data and injects synthetic data if needed. MAYONNAISE parameters are written in a json file called parameters_algo.json and placed in a working_directory.

[ascl:2307.060] MBASC: Multi-Band AGN-SFG Classifier

MBASC (Multi-Band AGN-SFG Classifier) classifies sources as Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) and Star Forming Galaxies (SFGs). The algorithm is based on the light gradient-boosting machine ML technique. MBASC can use a wide range of multi-wavelength data and redshifts to predict a classification for sources.

[ascl:1602.020] mbb_emcee: Modified Blackbody MCMC

Mbb_emcee fits modified blackbodies to photometry data using an affine invariant MCMC. It has large number of options which, for example, allow computation of the IR luminosity or dustmass as part of the fit. Carrying out a fit produces a HDF5 output file containing the results, which can either be read directly, or read back into a mbb_results object for analysis. Upper and lower limits can be imposed as well as Gaussian priors on the model parameters. These additions are useful for analyzing poorly constrained data. In addition to standard Python packages scipy, numpy, and cython, mbb_emcee requires emcee (ascl:1303.002), Astropy (ascl:1304.002), h5py, and for unit tests, nose.

[ascl:2010.001] MBF: MOLSCAT 2020, BOUND, and FIELD for atomic and molecular collisions

MOLSCAT, which supercedes MOLSCAT version 14 (ascl:1206.004), performs non-reactive quantum scattering calculations for atomic and molecular collisions using coupled-channel methods. Simple atom-molecule and molecule-molecule collision types are coded internally and additional ones may be handled with plug-in routines. Plug-in routines may include external magnetic, electric or photon fields (and combinations of them).

The package also includes BOUND, which performs calculations of bound-state energies in weakly bound atomic and molecular systems using coupled-channel methods, and FIELD, a development of BOUND that locates values of external fields at which a bound state exists with a specified energy. Though the three programs have different applications, they use closely related methods, share many subroutines, and are released with a single code base.

[ascl:1705.008] MBProj2: Multi-Band x-ray surface brightness PROJector 2

MBProj2 obtains thermodynamic profiles of galaxy clusters. It forward-models cluster X-ray surface brightness profiles in multiple bands, optionally assuming hydrostatic equilibrium. The code is a set of Python classes the user can use or extend. When modelling a cluster assuming hydrostatic equilibrium, the user chooses a form for the density profile (e.g. binning or a beta model), the metallicity profile, and the dark matter profile (e.g. NFW). If hydrostatic equilibrium is not assumed, a temperature profile model is used instead of the dark matter profile. The code uses the emcee Markov Chain Monte Carlo code (ascl:1303.002) to sample the model parameters, using these to produce chains of thermodynamic profiles.

[ascl:1703.014] MC-SPAM: Monte-Carlo Synthetic-Photometry/Atmosphere-Model

MC-SPAM (Monte-Carlo Synthetic-Photometry/Atmosphere-Model) generates limb-darkening coefficients from models that are comparable to transit photometry; it extends the original SPAM algorithm by Howarth (2011) by taking in consideration the uncertainty on the stellar and transit parameters of the system under analysis.

[ascl:1610.013] MC3: Multi-core Markov-chain Monte Carlo code

MC3 (Multi-core Markov-chain Monte Carlo) is a Bayesian statistics tool that can be executed from the shell prompt or interactively through the Python interpreter with single- or multiple-CPU parallel computing. It offers Markov-chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) posterior-distribution sampling for several algorithms, Levenberg-Marquardt least-squares optimization, and uniform non-informative, Jeffreys non-informative, or Gaussian-informative priors. MC3 can share the same value among multiple parameters and fix the value of parameters to constant values, and offers Gelman-Rubin convergence testing and correlated-noise estimation with time-averaging or wavelet-based likelihood estimation methods.

[ascl:1204.005] MC3D: Monte-Carlo 3D Radiative Transfer Code

MC3D is a 3D continuum radiative transfer code; it is based on the Monte-Carlo method and solves the radiative transfer problem self-consistently. It is designed for the simulation of dust temperatures in arbitrary geometric configurations and the resulting observables: spectral energy distributions, wavelength-dependent images, and polarization maps. The main objective is the investigation of "dust-dominated" astrophysical systems such as young stellar objects surrounded by an optically thick circumstellar disk and an optically thin(ner) envelope, debris disks around more evolved stars, asymptotic giant branch stars, the dust component of the interstellar medium, and active galactic nuclei.

[ascl:1511.008] MCAL: M dwarf metallicity and temperature calculator

MCAL calculates high precision metallicities and effective temperatures for M dwarfs; the method behaves properly down to R = 40 000 and S/N = 25, and results were validated against a sample of stars in common with SOPHIE high resolution spectra.

[ascl:2105.008] MCALF: Velocity information from spectral imaging observations

MCALF (Multi-Component Atmospheric Line Fitting) accurately constrains velocity information from spectral imaging observations using machine learning techniques. It is useful for solar physicists trying to extract line-of-sight (LOS) Doppler velocity information from spectral imaging observations (Stokes I measurements) of the Sun. A toolkit is provided that can be used to define a spectral model optimized for a particular dataset. MCALF is particularly suited for extracting velocity information from spectral imaging observations where the individual spectra can contain multiple spectral components. Such multiple components are typically present when active solar phenomenon occur within an isolated region of the solar disk. Spectra within such a region will often have a large emission component superimposed on top of the underlying absorption spectral profile from the quiescent solar atmosphere.

[ascl:2210.022] MCCD: Multi-CCD Point Spread Function Modelling

MCCD (Multi-CCD) generates a Point Spread Function (PSF) model based on stars observations in the field of view. After defining the MCCD model parameters and running and validating the training, the model can recover the PSF at any position in the field of view. Written in Python, MCCD also calculates various statistics and can plot a random test star and its model reconstruction.

[ascl:1906.017] mcfit: Multiplicatively Convolutional Fast Integral Transforms

mcfit computes integral transforms, inverse transforms without analytic inversion, and integral kernels as derivatives. It can also transform input array along any axis, output the matrix form, an is easily extensible for other kernels.

[ascl:2207.023] MCFOST: Radiative transfer code

MCFOST is a 3D continuum and line radiative transfer code based on an hybrid Monte Carlo and ray-tracing method. It is mainly designed to study the circumstellar environment of young stellar objects, but has been used for a wide range of astrophysical problems. The calculations are done exactly within the limitations of the Monte Carlo noise and machine precision, i.e., no approximation are used in the calculations. The code has been strongly optimized for speed.

MCFOST is primarily designed to study protoplanetary disks. The code can reproduce most of the observations of disks, including SEDs, scattered light images, IR and mm visibilities, and atomic and molecular line maps. As the Monte Carlo method is generic, any complex structure can be handled by MCFOST and its use can be extended to other astrophysical objects. For instance, calculations have succesfully been performed on infalling envelopes and AGB stars. MCFOST also includes a non-LTE line transfer module, and NLTE level population are obtained via iterations between Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations and statistical equilibrium.

[ascl:1107.015] McLuster: A Tool to Make a Star Cluster

The tool McLuster is an open source code that can be used to either set up initial conditions for N-body computations or, alternatively, to generate artificial star clusters for direct investigation. There are two different versions of the code, one basic version for generating all kinds of unevolved clusters (in the following called mcluster) and one for setting up evolved stellar populations at a given age. The former is completely contained in the C file main.c. The latter (dubbed mcluster_sse) is more complex and requires additional FORTRAN routines, namely the Single-Star Evolution (SSE) routines by Hurley, Pols & Tout (ascl:1303.015) that are provided with the McLuster code.

[ascl:1407.004] MCMAC: Monte Carlo Merger Analysis Code

Monte Carlo Merger Analysis Code (MCMAC) aids in the study of merging clusters. It takes observed priors on each subcluster's mass, radial velocity, and projected separation, draws randomly from those priors, and uses them in a analytic model to get posterior PDF's for merger dynamic properties of interest (e.g. collision velocity, time since collision).

[ascl:2011.004] MCMCDiagnostics: Markov Chain Monte Carlo convergence diagnostics

MCMCDiagnostics contains two diagnostics, written in Julia, for Markov Chain Monte Carlo. The first is potential_scale_reduction(chains...), which estimates the potential scale reduction factor, also known as Rhat, for multiple scalar chains
. The second, effective_sample_size(chain), calculates the effective sample size for scalar chains. These diagnostics are intended as building blocks for use by other libraries.

[ascl:2001.012] MCMCI: Markov Chain Monte Carlo + Isochrones method for characterizing exoplanetary systems

MCMCI (Markov chain Monte Carlo + isochrones) characterizes a whole exoplanetary system directly by modeling the star and its planets simultaneously. The code, written in Fortran, uses light curves and basic stellar parameters with a transit analysis algorithm that interacts with stellar evolutionary models, thus using both model-dependent and empirical age indicators to characterize the system.

[ascl:1210.017] McPHAC: McGill Planar Hydrogen Atmosphere Code

The McGill Planar Hydrogen Atmosphere Code (McPHAC) v1.1 calculates the hydrostatic equilibrium structure and emergent spectrum of an unmagnetized hydrogen atmosphere in the plane-parallel approximation at surface gravities appropriate for neutron stars. McPHAC incorporates several improvements over previous codes for which tabulated model spectra are available: (1) Thomson scattering is treated anisotropically, which is shown to result in a 0.2%-3% correction in the emergent spectral flux across the 0.1-5 keV passband; (2) the McPHAC source code is made available to the community, allowing it to be scrutinized and modified by other researchers wishing to study or extend its capabilities; and (3) the numerical uncertainty resulting from the discrete and iterative solution is studied as a function of photon energy, indicating that McPHAC is capable of producing spectra with numerical uncertainties <0.01%. The accuracy of the spectra may at present be limited to ~1%, but McPHAC enables researchers to study the impact of uncertain inputs and additional physical effects, thereby supporting future efforts to reduce those inaccuracies. Comparison of McPHAC results with spectra from one of the previous model atmosphere codes (NSA) shows agreement to lsim1% near the peaks of the emergent spectra. However, in the Wien tail a significant deficit of flux in the spectra of the previous model is revealed, determined to be due to the previous work not considering large enough optical depths at the highest photon frequencies. The deficit is most significant for spectra with T eff < 105.6 K, though even there it may not be of much practical importance for most observations.

[ascl:2107.025] MCPM: Modified CPM method

MCPM extracts K2 photometry in dense stellar regions; the code is a modification and extension of the K2-CPM package (ascl:2107.024), which was developed for less-crowded fields. MCPM uses the pixel response function together with accurate astrometric grids, combining signals from a few pixels, and simultaneously fits for an astrophysical model to produce extracted more precise K2 photometry.

[ascl:2005.019] MCRaT: Monte Carlo Radiation Transfer

MCRaT (Monte Carlo Radiation Transfer) analyzes the radiation signature expected from astrophysical outflows. MCRaT injects photons in a FLASH (ascl:1010.082) simulation and individually propagates and compton scatters the photons through the fluid until the end of the simulation. This process of injection and propagating occurs for a user specified number of times until there are no more photons to be injected. Users can then construct light curves and spectra with the MCRaT calculated results. The hydrodynamic simulations used with this version of MCRaT must be in 2D; however, the photon propagation and scattering is done in 3D by assuming cylindrical symmetry. Additionally, MCRaT uses the full Klein–Nishina cross section including the effects of polarization, which can be fully simulated in the code. MCRaT works with FLASH hydrodynamic simulations and PLUTO (ascl:1010.045) AMR simulations, with both 2D spherical (r, equation) and 2D cartesian ((x,y) and (r,z)).

[ascl:1907.026] MCRGNet: Morphological Classification of Radio Galaxy Network

MCRGNet (Morphological Classification of Radio Galaxy Network) classifies radio galaxies of different morphologies. It is based on the Convolutional Neural Network (CNN), which is trained and applied under a three-step framework: 1.) pretraining the network unsupervisedly with unlabeled samples, 2.) fine-tuning the pretrained network parameters supervisedly with labeled samples, and 3.) classifying a new radio galaxy by the trained network. The code uses a dichotomous tree classifier composed of cascaded CNN based subclassifiers.

[ascl:1201.001] McScatter: Three-Body Scattering with Stellar Evolution

McScatter illustrates a method of combining stellar dynamics with stellar evolution. The method is intended for elaborate applications, especially the dynamical evolution of rich star clusters. The dynamics is based on binary scattering in a multi-mass field of stars with uniform density and velocity dispersion, using the scattering cross section of Giersz (MNRAS, 2001, 324, 218-30).

[ascl:2006.022] MCSED: Spectral energy distribution fitting package for galactic systems

MCSED models the optical, near-infrared and infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) of galactic systems. Its modularity and options make it flexible and able to address the varying physical properties of galaxies over cosmic time and environment and adjust to changes in understanding of stellar evolution, the details of mass loss, and the products of binary evolution through substitution or addition of new datasets or algorithms. MCSED is built to fit a galaxy’s full SED, from the far-UV to the far-IR. Among other physical processes, it can model continuum emission from stars, continuum and line-emission from ionized gas, attenuation from dust, and mid- and far-IR emission from dust and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). MCSED performs its calculations by creating a complex stellar population (CSP) out of a linear combination of simple-stellar populations (SSPs) using an efficient Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. It is very quick, and takes advantage of parallel processing.

[ascl:1504.008] MCSpearman: Monte Carlo error analyses of Spearman's rank test

Spearman’s rank correlation test is commonly used in astronomy to discern whether a set of two variables are correlated or not. Unlike most other quantities quoted in astronomical literature, the Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient is generally quoted with no attempt to estimate the errors on its value. This code implements a number of Monte Carlo based methods to estimate the uncertainty on the Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient.

[ascl:1302.012] ME(SSY)**2: Monte Carlo Code for Star Cluster Simulations

ME(SSY)**2 stands for “Monte-carlo Experiments with Spherically SYmmetric Stellar SYstems." This code simulates the long term evolution of spherical clusters of stars; it was devised specifically to treat dense galactic nuclei. It is based on the pioneering Monte Carlo scheme proposed by Hénon in the 70's and includes all relevant physical ingredients (2-body relaxation, stellar mass spectrum, collisions, tidal disruption, ldots). It is basically a Monte Carlo resolution of the Fokker-Planck equation. It can cope with any stellar mass spectrum or velocity distribution. Being a particle-based method, it also allows one to take stellar collisions into account in a very realistic way. This unique code, featuring most important physical processes, allows million particle simulations, spanning a Hubble time, in a few CPU days on standard personal computers and provides a wealth of data only rivalized by N-body simulations. The current version of the software requires the use of routines from the "Numerical Recipes in Fortran 77" (http://www.nrbook.com/a/bookfpdf.php).

[submitted] Mean Motion Resonances

Site with collection of codes and fundamental references on mean motion resonances.

[ascl:1205.001] Mechanic: Numerical MPI framework for dynamical astronomy

The Mechanic package is a numerical framework for dynamical astronomy, designed to help in massive numerical simulations by efficient task management and unified data storage. The code is built on top of the Message Passing Interface (MPI) and Hierarchical Data Format (HDF5) standards and uses the Task Farm approach to manage numerical tasks. It relies on the core-module approach. The numerical problem implemented in the user-supplied module is separated from the host code (core). The core is designed to handle basic setup, data storage and communication between nodes in a computing pool. It has been tested on large CPU-clusters, as well as desktop computers. The Mechanic may be used in computing dynamical maps, data optimization or numerical integration.

[ascl:1106.006] MECI: A Method for Eclipsing Component Identification

We describe an automated method for assigning the most probable physical parameters to the components of an eclipsing binary, using only its photometric light curve and combined colors. With traditional methods, one attempts to optimize a multi-parameter model over many iterations, so as to minimize the chi-squared value. We suggest an alternative method, where one selects pairs of coeval stars from a set of theoretical stellar models, and compares their simulated light curves and combined colors with the observations. This approach greatly reduces the parameter space over which one needs to search, and allows one to estimate the components' masses, radii and absolute magnitudes, without spectroscopic data. We have implemented this method in an automated program using published theoretical isochrones and limb-darkening coefficients. Since it is easy to automate, this method lends itself to systematic analyses of datasets consisting of photometric time series of large numbers of stars, such as those produced by OGLE, MACHO, TrES, HAT, and many others surveys.

[ascl:2105.009] MeerCRAB: Transient classifier using a deep learning model

MeerCRAB (MeerLICHT Classification of Real and Bogus Transients using Deep Learning) filters out false detections of transients from true astrophysical sources in the transient detection pipeline of the MeerLICHT telescope. It uses a deep learning model based on Convolutional Neural Network.

[ascl:1906.018] MEGAlib: Medium Energy Gamma-ray Astronomy library

The Medium Energy Gamma-ray Astronomy library (MEGAlib) simulates, calibrates, and analyzes data of hard X-ray and gamma-ray detectors, with a specialization on Compton telescopes. The library comprises all necessary data analysis steps for these telescopes, from simulation/measurements via calibration, event reconstruction to image reconstruction.

MEGAlib contains a geometry and detector description tool for the detailed modeling of different detector types and characteristics, and provides an easy to use simulation program based on Geant4 (ascl:1010.079). For different Compton telescope detector types (electron tracking, multiple Compton or time of flight based), specialized Compton event reconstruction algorithms are implemented in different approaches (Chi-square and Bayesian). The high level data analysis tools calculate response matrices, perform image deconvolution (specialized in list-mode-likelihood-based Compton image reconstruction), determine detector resolutions and sensitivities, retrieve spectra, and determine polarization modulations.

[ascl:1203.008] MegaLUT: Correcting ellipticity measurements of galaxies

MegaLUT is a simple and fast method to correct ellipticity measurements of galaxies from the distortion by the instrumental and atmospheric point spread function (PSF), in view of weak lensing shear measurements. The method performs a classification of galaxies and associated PSFs according to measured shape parameters, and builds a lookup table of ellipticity corrections by supervised learning. This new method has been applied to the GREAT10 image analysis challenge, and demonstrates a refined solution that obtains the highly competitive quality factor of Q = 142, without any power spectrum denoising or training. Of particular interest is the efficiency of the method, with a processing time below 3 ms per galaxy on an ordinary CPU.

[ascl:1711.012] megaman: Manifold Learning for Millions of Points

megaman is a scalable manifold learning package implemented in python. It has a front-end API designed to be familiar to scikit-learn but harnesses the C++ Fast Library for Approximate Nearest Neighbors (FLANN) and the Sparse Symmetric Positive Definite (SSPD) solver Locally Optimal Block Precodition Gradient (LOBPCG) method to scale manifold learning algorithms to large data sets. It is designed for researchers and as such caches intermediary steps and indices to allow for fast re-computation with new parameters.

[ascl:2109.025] Menura: Multi-GPU numerical model for space plasma simulation

Menura simulates the interaction between a fully turbulent solar wind and various bodies of the solar system using a novel two-step approach. It is an advanced numerical tool for self-consistent modeling that bridges planetary science and plasma physics. Menura is built around a hybrid Particle-In-Cell solver, treating electrons as a charge-neutralising fluid, and ions as massive particles. It solves iteratively the particles’ dynamics, gathers particle moments at the nodes of a grid, at which the magnetic field is also computed, and then solves the Maxwell equations. This solver uses the popular Current Advance Method (CAM).

[ascl:1410.002] MEPSA: Multiple Excess Peak Search Algorithm

MEPSA (Multiple Excess Peak Search Algorithm) identifies peaks within a uniformly sampled time series affected by uncorrelated Gaussian noise. MEPSA scans the time series at different timescales by comparing a given peak candidate with a variable number of adjacent bins. While this has originally been conceived for the analysis of gamma-ray burst light (GRB) curves, its usage can be readily extended to other astrophysical transient phenomena whose activity is recorded through different surveys. MEPSA's high flexibility permits the mask of excess patterns it uses to be tailored and optimized without modifying the code.

[ascl:1209.010] MeqTrees: Software package for implementing Measurement Equations

MeqTrees is a software package for implementing Measurement Equations. This makes it uniquely suited for simulation and calibration of radioastronomical data, especially that involving new radiotelescopes and observational regimes. MeqTrees is implemented as a Python-based front-end called the meqbrowser, and an efficient (C++-based) computational back-end called the meqserver. Numerical models are defined on the front-end via a Python-based Tree Definition Language (TDL), then rapidly executed on the back-end. The use of TDL facilitates an extremely short turn-around time for experimentation with new ideas. This is also helped by unprecedented visualization capabilities for all final and intermediate results. A flexible data model and a number of important optimizations in the back-end ensures that the numerical performance is comparable to that of hand-written code.

MeqTrees includes a highly capable FITS viewer and sky model manager called Tigger, which can also work as a standalone tool.

[submitted] MERA: Analysis Tool for Astrophysical Simulation Data in the Julia Language

MERA works with large 3D AMR/uniform-grid and N-body particle data sets from astrophysical simulations such as those produced by the hydrodynamic code RAMSES (ascl:1011.007) and is written entirely in the Julia language. The package provides essential functions for efficient and memory lightweight data loading and analysis. The core of MERA is a database framework.

[ascl:1511.020] Mercury-T: Tidally evolving multi-planet systems code

Mercury-T calculates the evolution of semi-major axis, eccentricity, inclination, rotation period and obliquity of the planets as well as the rotation period evolution of the host body; it is based on the N-body code Mercury (Chambers 1999, ascl:1201.008). It is flexible, allowing computation of the tidal evolution of systems orbiting any non-evolving object (if its mass, radius, dissipation factor and rotation period are known), but also evolving brown dwarfs (BDs) of mass between 0.01 and 0.08 M⊙, an evolving M-dwarf of 0.1 M⊙, an evolving Sun-like star, and an evolving Jupiter.

[ascl:1201.008] Mercury: A software package for orbital dynamics

Mercury is a new general-purpose software package for carrying out orbital integrations for problems in solar-system dynamics. Suitable applications include studying the long-term stability of the planetary system, investigating the orbital evolution of comets, asteroids or meteoroids, and simulating planetary accretion. Mercury is designed to be versatile and easy to use, accepting initial conditions in either Cartesian coordinates or Keplerian elements in "cometary" or "asteroidal" format, with different epochs of osculation for different objects. Output from an integration consists of osculating elements, written in a machine-independent compressed format, which allows the results of a calculation performed on one platform to be transferred (e.g. via FTP) and decoded on another.

During an integration, Mercury monitors and records details of close encounters, sungrazing events, ejections and collisions between objects. The effects of non-gravitational forces on comets can also be modeled. The package supports integrations using a mixed-variable symplectic routine, the Bulirsch-Stoer method, and a hybrid code for planetary accretion calculations.

[ascl:1305.015] Merger Trees: Formation history of dark matter haloes

Merger Trees uses a Monte Carlo algorithm to generate merger trees describing the formation history of dark matter haloes; the algorithm is implemented in Fortran. The algorithm is a modification of the algorithm of Cole et al. used in the GALFORM semi-analytic galaxy formation model (ascl:1510.005) based on the Extended Press–Schechter theory. It should be applicable to hierarchical models with a wide range of power spectra and cosmological models. It is tuned to be in accurate agreement with the conditional mass functions found in the analysis of merger trees extracted from the Λ cold dark matter Millennium N-body simulation. The code should be a useful tool for semi-analytic models of galaxy formation and for modelling hierarchical structure formation in general.

[ascl:1010.083] MESA: Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics

Stellar physics and evolution calculations enable a broad range of research in astrophysics. Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) is a suite of open source libraries for a wide range of applications in computational stellar astrophysics. A newly designed 1-D stellar evolution module, MESA star, combines many of the numerical and physics modules for simulations of a wide range of stellar evolution scenarios ranging from very-low mass to massive stars, including advanced evolutionary phases. MESA star solves the fully coupled structure and composition equations simultaneously. It uses adaptive mesh refinement and sophisticated timestep controls, and supports shared memory parallelism based on OpenMP. Independently usable modules provide equation of state, opacity, nuclear reaction rates, and atmosphere boundary conditions. Each module is constructed as a separate Fortran 95 library with its own public interface. Examples include comparisons to other codes and show evolutionary tracks of very low mass stars, brown dwarfs, and gas giant planets; the complete evolution of a 1 Msun star from the pre-main sequence to a cooling white dwarf; the Solar sound speed profile; the evolution of intermediate mass stars through the thermal pulses on the He-shell burning AGB phase; the interior structure of slowly pulsating B Stars and Beta Cepheids; evolutionary tracks of massive stars from the pre-main sequence to the onset of core collapse; stars undergoing Roche lobe overflow; and accretion onto a neutron star.

[ascl:1709.003] MeshLab: 3D triangular meshes processing and editing

MeshLab processes and edits 3D triangular meshes. It includes tools for editing, cleaning, healing, inspecting, rendering, texturing and converting meshes, and offers features for processing raw data produced by 3D digitization tools and devices and for preparing models for 3D printing.

[ascl:1612.012] Meso-NH: Non-hydrostatic mesoscale atmospheric model

Meso-NH is the non-hydrostatic mesoscale atmospheric model of the French research community jointly developed by the Laboratoire d'Aérologie (UMR 5560 UPS/CNRS) and by CNRM (UMR 3589 CNRS/Météo-France). Meso-NH incorporates a non-hydrostatic system of equations for dealing with scales ranging from large (synoptic) to small (large eddy) scales while calculating budgets and has a complete set of physical parameterizations for the representation of clouds and precipitation. It is coupled to the surface model SURFEX for representation of surface atmosphere interactions by considering different surface types (vegetation, city​​, ocean, lake) and allows a multi-scale approach through a grid-nesting technique. Meso-NH is versatile, vectorized, parallelized, and operates in 1D, 2D or 3D; it is coupled with a chemistry module (including gas-phase, aerosol, and aqua-phase components) and a lightning module, and has observation operators that compare model output directly with satellite observations, radar, lidar and GPS.

[ascl:1111.009] MESS: Multi-purpose Exoplanet Simulation System

MESS is a Monte Carlo simulation IDL code which uses either the results of the statistical analysis of the properties of discovered planets, or the results of the planet formation theories, to build synthetic planet populations fully described in terms of frequency, orbital elements and physical properties. They can then be used to either test the consistency of their properties with the observed population of planets given different detection techniques or to actually predict the expected number of planets for future surveys. It can be used to probe the physical and orbital properties of a putative companion within the circumstellar disk of a given star and to test constrain the orbital distribution properties of a potential planet population around the members of the TW Hydrae association. Finally, using in its predictive mode, the synergy of future space and ground-based telescopes instrumentation has been investigated to identify the mass-period parameter space that will be probed in future surveys for giant and rocky planets. A Python version of this code, Exo-DMC (ascl:2010.008), is available.

[ascl:2207.003] MeSsI: MErging SystemS Identification

MeSsI performs an automatic classification between merging and relaxed clusters. This method was calibrated using mock catalogues constructed from the millennium simulation, and performs the classification using some machine learning techniques, namely random forest for classification and mixture of gaussians for the substructure identification.

[ascl:1205.010] Meudon PDR: Atomic & molecular structure of interstellar clouds

The Meudon PDR code computes the atomic and molecular structure of interstellar clouds. It can be used to study the physics and chemistry of diffuse clouds, photodissociation regions (PDRs), dark clouds, or circumstellar regions. The model computes the thermal balance of a stationary plane-parallel slab of gas and dust illuminated by a radiation field and takes into account heating processes such as the photoelectric effect on dust, chemistry, cosmic rays, etc. and cooling resulting from infrared and millimeter emission of the abundant species. Chemistry is solved for any number of species and reactions. Once abundances of atoms and molecules and level excitation of the most important species have been computed at each point, line intensities and column densities can be deduced.

[ascl:2203.021] MG-MAMPOSSt: Test gravity with the mass profiles of galaxy clusters

MG-MAMPOSSt extends the MAMPOSSt code (ascl:2203.020), which performs Bayesian fits of models of mass and velocity anisotropy profiles to the distribution of tracers in projected phase space, to handle modified gravity models and constrain its parameters. It implements two distinct types of gravity modifications: general chameleon (including $f(\mathcal{R})$ models), and beyond Horndeski gravity (Vainshtein screening). MG-MAMPOSSt efficently explores the parameter space either by computing the likelihood over a multi-dimensional grid of points or by performing a simple Metropolis-Hastings MCMC. The code requires a Fortran90 compiler or higher and makes use of the getdist package (ascl:1910.018) to plot the marginalized distributions in the MCMC mode.

[ascl:2306.048] MG-PICOLA: Simulating cosmological structure formation

MG-PICOLA is a modified version of L-PICOLA (ascl:1507.004) that extends the COLA approach for simulating cosmological structure formation to theories that exhibit scale-dependent growth. It can compute matter power-spectra (CDM and total), redshift-space multipole power-spectra P0,P2,P4 and do halofinding on the fly.

[ascl:1907.031] MGB: Interactive spectral classification code

MGB (Marxist Ghost Buster) attacks spectral classification by using an interactive comparison with spectral libraries. It allows the user to move along the two traditional dimensions of spectral classification (spectral subtype and luminosity classification) plus the two additional ones of rotation index and spectral peculiarities. Double-lined spectroscopic binaries can also be fitted using a combination of two standards. The code includes OB2500 v2.0, a standard grid of blue-violet R ~ 2500 spectra of O stars from the Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey, but other grids can be added to MGB.

[ascl:1106.013] MGCAMB: Modification of Growth with CAMB

CAMB is a public Fortran 90 code written by Antony Lewis and Anthony Challinor for evaluating cosmological observables. MGCAMB is a modified version of CAMB in which the linearized Einstein equations of General Relativity (GR) are modified. MGCAMB can also be used in CosmoMC to fit different modified-gravity (MG) models to data.

[ascl:2211.007] mgcnn: Standard and modified gravity (MG) cosmological models classifier

mgcnn is a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) architecture for classifying standard and modified gravity (MG) cosmological models based on the weak-lensing convergence maps they produce. It is implemented in Keras using TensorFlow as the backend. The code offers three options for the noise flag, which correspond to noise standard deviations, and additional options for the number of training iterations and epochs. Confusion matrices and evaluation metrics (loss function and validation accuracy) are saved as numpy arrays in the generated output/ directory after each iteration.

[ascl:2212.003] MGCosmoPop: Modified gravity and cosmology with binary black holes population models

MGCosmoPop implements a hierarchical Bayesian inference method for constraining the background cosmological history, in particular the Hubble constant, together with modified gravitational-wave propagation and binary black holes population models (mass, redshift and spin distributions) with gravitational-wave data. It includes support for loading and analyzing data from the GWTC-3 catalog as well as for generating injections to evaluate selection effects, and features a module to run in parallel on clusters.

[ascl:1403.017] MGE_FIT_SECTORS: Multi-Gaussian Expansion fits to galaxy images

MGE_FIT_SECTORS performs Multi-Gaussian Expansion (MGE) fits to galaxy images. The MGE parameterizations are useful in the construction of realistic dynamical models of galaxies, PSF deconvolution of images, the correction and estimation of dust absorption effects, and galaxy photometry. The algorithm is well suited for use with multiple-resolution images (e.g. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based images).

[ascl:1010.081] MGGPOD: A Monte Carlo Suite for Gamma-Ray Astronomy

We have developed MGGPOD, a user-friendly suite of Monte Carlo codes built around the widely used GEANT (Version 3.21) package. The MGGPOD Monte Carlo suite and documentation are publicly available for download. MGGPOD is an ideal tool for supporting the various stages of gamma-ray astronomy missions, ranging from the design, development, and performance prediction through calibration and response generation to data reduction. In particular, MGGPOD is capable of simulating ab initio the physical processes relevant for the production of instrumental backgrounds. These include the build-up and delayed decay of radioactive isotopes as well as the prompt de-excitation of excited nuclei, both of which give rise to a plethora of instrumental gamma-ray background lines in addition to continuum backgrounds.

[ascl:1402.035] MGHalofit: Modified Gravity extension of Halofit

MGHalofit is a modified gravity extension of the fitting formula for the matter power spectrum of HALOFIT and its improvement by Takahashi et al. MGHalofit is implemented in MGCAMB, which is based on CAMB. MGHalofit calculates the nonlinear matter power spectrum P(k) for the Hu-Sawicki model. Comparing MGHalofit predictions at various redshifts (z<=1) to the f(R) simulations, the accuracy on P(k) is 6% at k<1 h/Mpc and 12% at 1<k<10 h/Mpc respectively.

[ascl:2402.005] MGPT: Modified Gravity Perturbation Theory code

MGPT (Modified Gravity Perturbation Theory) computes 2-point statistics for LCDM model, DGP and Hu-Sawicky f(R) gravity. Written in C, the code can be easily modified to include other models. Specifically, it computes the SPT matter power spectrum, SPT Lagrangian-biased tracers power spectrum, and the CLPT matter correlation function. MGPT also computes the CLPT Lagrangian-biased tracers correlation function and a set of Q and R functionsfrom which other statistics, as leading order bispectrum, can be constructed.

[ascl:2301.026] MGwave: Detect kinematic moving groups in astronomical data

The 2-D wavelet transformation code MGwave detects kinematic moving groups in astronomical data; it can also investigate underdensities which can eventually provide further information about the MW's non-axisymmetric features. The code creates a histogram of the input data, then performs the wavelet transformation at the specified scales, returning the wavelet coefficients across the entire histogram in addition to information about the detected extrema. MGwave can also run Monte Carlo simulations to propagate uncertainties. It runs the wavelet transformation on simulated data (pulled from Gaussian distributions) many times and tracks the percentage of the simulations in which a given extrema is detected. This quantifies whether a detected overdensity or underdensity is robust to variations of the data within the provided errors.

[ascl:1511.007] MHF: MLAPM Halo Finder

MHF is a Dark Matter halo finder that is based on the refinement grids of MLAPM. The grid structure of MLAPM adaptively refines around high-density regions with an automated refinement algorithm, thus naturally "surrounding" the Dark Matter halos, as they are simply manifestations of over-densities within (and exterior) to the underlying host halo. Using this grid structure, MHF restructures the hierarchy of nested isolated MLAPM grids into a "grid tree". The densest cell in the end of a tree branch marks center of a prospective Dark Matter halo. All gravitationally bound particles about this center are collected to obtain the final halo catalog. MHF automatically finds halos within halos within halos.

[ascl:1205.003] MIA+EWS: MIDI data reduction tool

MIA+EWS is a package of two data reduction tools for MIDI data which uses power-spectrum analysis or the information contained in the spectrally-dispersed fringe measurements in order to estimate the correlated flux and the visibility as function of wavelength in the N-band. MIA, which stands for MIDI Interactive Analysis, uses a Fast Fourier Transformation to calculate the Fourier amplitudes of the fringe packets to calculate the correlated flux and visibility. EWS stands for Expert Work-Station, which is a collection of IDL tools to apply coherent visibility analysis to reduce MIDI data. The EWS package allows the user to control and examine almost every aspect of MIDI data and its reduction. The usual data products are the correlated fluxes, total fluxes and differential phase.

[ascl:2005.002] michi2: SED and SLED fitting tool

michi2 fits combinations of arbitrary numbers of libraries/components to a given observational data. Written in C++ and Python, this chi-square fitting tool can fit a galaxy's spectral energy distribution (SED) with stellar, active galactic nuclear, dust and radio SED templates, and fit a galaxy's spectral line energy distribution (SLED) with one or more gas components using radiative transfer LVG model grid libraries.

michi2 first samples the high-dimensional parameter space (N1*N2*N3*..., where N is the number of independent templates in each library, and 1/2/3 is the ID of components) in an optimized way for a few thousand or tens of thousand times to compute the chi-square to the input observational data, then uses Python scripts to analyze the chi-square distribution and derive the best-fit, median, lower and higher 1-sigma values for each parameter in each library/component. This tool is useful for fitting larger number of templates and arbitrary combinations of libraries/components, including some constraining of one library/component onto another.

[ascl:1011.017] Microccult: Occultation and Microlensing

Occultation and microlensing are different limits of the same phenomena of one body passing in front of another body. We derive a general exact analytic expression which describes both microlensing and occultation in the case of spherical bodies with a source of uniform brightness and a non-relativistic foreground body. We also compute numerically the case of a source with quadratic limb-darkening. In the limit that the gravitational deflection angle is comparable to the angular size of the foreground body, both microlensing and occultation occur as the objects align. Such events may be used to constrain the size ratio of the lens and source stars, the limb-darkening coefficients of the source star, and the surface gravity of the lens star (if the lens and source distances are known). Application of these results to microlensing during transits in binaries and giant-star microlensing are discussed. These results unify the microlensing and occultation limits and should be useful for rapid model fitting of microlensing, eclipse, and "microccultation" events.

[ascl:1303.007] micrOMEGAs: Calculation of dark matter properties

micrOMEGAs calculates the properties of cold dark matter in a generic model of particle physics. First developed to compute the relic density of dark matter, the code also computes the rates for dark matter direct and indirect detection. The code provides the mass spectrum, cross-sections, relic density and exotic fluxes of gamma rays, positrons and antiprotons. The propagation of charged particles in the Galactic halo is handled with a module that allows to easily modify the propagation parameters. The cross-sections for both spin dependent and spin independent interactions of WIMPS on protons are computed automatically as well as the rates for WIMP scattering on nuclei in a large detector. Annihilation cross-sections of the dark matter candidate at zero velocity, relevant for indirect detection of dark matter, are computed automatically, and the propagation of charged particles in the Galactic halo is also handled.

[ascl:1010.008] midIR_sensitivity: Mid-infrared astronomy with METIS

midIR_sensitivity is IDL code that calculates the sensitivity of a ground-based mid-infrared instrument for astronomy. The code was written for the Phase A study of the instrument METIS (http://www.strw.leidenuniv.nl/metis), the Mid-Infrared E-ELT Imager and Spectrograph, for the 42-m European Extremely Large Telescope. The model uses a detailed set of input parameters for site characteristics and atmospheric profiles, optical design, and thermal background. The code and all input parameters are highly tailored for the particular design parameters of the E-ELT and METIS, however, the program is structured in such a way that the parameters can easily be adjusted for a different system, or alternative input files used.

[ascl:1807.016] MIDLL: Markwardt IDL Library

The Markwardt IDL Library contains routines for curve fitting and function minimization, including MPFIT (ascl:1208.019), statistical tests, and non-linear optimization (TNMIN); graphics programs including plotting three-dimensional data as a cube and fixed- or variable-width histograms; adaptive numerical integration (Quadpack), Chebyshev approximation and interpolation, and other mathematical tools; many ephemeris and timing routines; and array and set operations, such as computing the fast product of a large array, efficiently inserting or deleting elements in an array, and performing set operations on numbers and strings; and many other useful and varied routines.

[ascl:1810.019] MIEX: Mie scattering code for large grains

Miex calculates Mie scattering coefficients and efficiency factors for broad grain size distributions and a very wide wavelength range (λ ≈ 10-10-10-2m) of the interacting radiation and incorporates standard solutions of the scattering amplitude functions. The code handles arbitrary size parameters, and single scattering by particle ensembles is calculated by proper averaging of the respective parameters.

[ascl:1511.012] milkywayproject_triggering: Correlation functions for two catalog datasets

This triggering code calculates the correlation function between two astrophysical data catalogs using the Landy-Szalay approximator generalized for heterogeneous datasets (Landy & Szalay, 1993; Bradshaw et al, 2011) or the auto-correlation function of one dataset. It assumes that one catalog has positional information as well as an object size (effective radius), and the other only positional information.

[ascl:1811.010] MillCgs: Searching for Compact Groups in the Millennium Simulation

MillCgs clusters galaxies from the semi-analytic models run on top of the Millennium Simulation to identify Compact Groups. MillCgs uses a machine learning clustering algorithm to find the groups and then runs analytics to filter out the groups that do not fit the user specified criteria. The package downloads the data, processes it, and then creates graphs of the data.

[ascl:2108.005] millennium-tap-query: Python tool to query the Millennium Simulation UWS/TAP client

millennium-tap-query is a simple wrapper for the Python package requests to deal with connections to the Millennium TAP Web Client. With this tool you can perform basic or advanced queries to the Millennium Simulation database and download the data products. millennium-tap-query is similar to the TAP query tool in the German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (GAVO) VOtables package.

[ascl:0101.001] MILLISEARCH: A Search for Millilensing in BATSE GRB Data

The millisearch.for code was used to generate a new search for the gravitational lens effects of a significant cosmological density of supermassive compact objects (SCOs) on gamma-ray bursts. No signal attributable to millilensing was found. We inspected the timing data of 774 BATSE-triggered GRBs for evidence of millilensing: repeated peaks similar in light-curve shape and spectra. Our null detection leads us to conclude that, in all candidate universes simulated, OmegaSCO < 0.1 is favored for 105 < MSCO/Modot < 109, while in some universes and mass ranges the density limits are as much as 10 times lower. Therefore, a cosmologically significant population of SCOs near globular cluster mass neither came out of the primordial universe, nor condensed at recombination.

[ascl:1911.023] miluphcuda: Smooth particle hydrodynamics code

miluphcuda is the CUDA port of the original miluph code; it runs on single Nvidia GPUs with compute capability 5.0 and higher and provides fast and efficient computation. The code can be used for hydrodynamical simulations and collision and impact physics, and features self-gravity via Barnes-Hut trees and porosity models such as P-alpha and epsilon-alpha. It can model solid bodies, including ductile and brittle materials, as well as non-viscous fluids, granular media, and porous continua.

[ascl:2001.001] Min-CaLM: Mineral compositional analysis on debris disk spectra

Min-CaLM performs automated mineral compositional analysis on debris disk spectra. The user inputs the debris disk spectrum, and using Min-CaLM's built-in mineralogical library, Min-CaLM calculates the relative mineral abundances within the disk. To do this calculation, Min-CaLM converts the debris disk spectrum and the mineralogical library spectra into a system of linear equations, which it then solves using non-negative least square minimization. This code comes with a GitHub tutorial on how to use the Min-CaLM package.

[ascl:2403.007] MINDS: Hybrid pipeline for the reduction of JWST/MIRI-MRS data

The MINDS hybrid pipeline is based on the JWST pipeline and routines from the VIP package (ascl:1603.003) for the reduction of JWST MIRI-MRS data. The pipeline compensates for some of the known weaknesses of the official JWST pipeline to improve the quality of spectrum extracted from MIRI-MRS data. This is done by leveraging the capabilities of VIP, another large data reduction package used in the field of high-contrast imaging.

The front end of the pipeline is a highly automated Jupyter notebook. Parameters are typically set in one cell at the beginning of the notebook, and the rest of the notebook can be run without any further modification. The Jupyter notebook format provides flexibility, enhanced visibility of intermediate and final results, more straightforward troubleshooting, and the possibility to easily incorporate additional codes by the user to further analyze or exploit their results.

[ascl:1302.006] Minerva: Cylindrical coordinate extension for Athena

Minerva is a cylindrical coordinate extension of the Athena astrophysical MHD code of Stone, Gardiner, Teuben, and Hawley. The extension follows the approach of Athena's original developers and has been designed to alter the existing Cartesian-coordinates code as minimally and transparently as possible. The numerical equations in cylindrical coordinates are formulated to maintain consistency with constrained transport (CT), a central feature of the Athena algorithm, while making use of previously implemented code modules such as the Riemann solvers. Angular momentum transport, which is critical in astrophysical disk systems dominated by rotation, is treated carefully.

[ascl:2009.012] minot: Modeling framework for diffuse components in galaxy clusters

minot (Modeling of the ICM (Non-)thermal content and Observables prediction Tools) provides a self-consistent modeling framework for the thermal and non-thermal diffuse components in galaxy clusters and predictions multi-wavelength observables. The framework sets or modifies the cluster object according to set parameters and defines the physical and observational properties, which can include thermal gas and CR physics, tSZ, inverse Compton, and radio synchotron. minot then generates outputs, including model parameters, plots, and relationships between models.

[ascl:2203.008] MIRaGe: Multi Instrument Ramp Generator

MIRaGe creates simulated exposures for NIRCam’s imaging and wide field slitless spectroscopy (WFSS) modes, NIRISS’s imaging, WFSS, and aperture masking interferometery (AMI) modes, and FGS’s imaging mode. It supports sidereal as well as non-sidereal tracking; for example, sources can be made to move across the field of view within an observation.

[submitted] MiraPy: Python package for Deep Learning in Astronomy

MiraPy is a Python package for problem-solving in astronomy using Deep Learning for astrophysicist, researchers and students. Current applications of MiraPy are X-Ray Binary classification, ATLAS variable star feature classification, OGLE variable star light-curve classification, HTRU1 dataset classification and Astronomical image reconstruction using encoder-decoder network. It also contains modules for loading various datasets, curve-fitting, visualization and other utilities. It is built using Keras for developing ML models to run on CPU and GPU seamlessly.

[ascl:1106.007] MIRIAD: Multi-channel Image Reconstruction, Image Analysis, and Display

MIRIAD is a radio interferometry data-reduction package, designed for taking raw visibility data through calibration to the image analysis stage. It has been designed to handle any interferometric array, with working examples for BIMA, CARMA, SMA, WSRT, and ATCA. A separate version for ATCA is available, which differs in a few minor ways from the CARMA version.

[ascl:2102.017] mirkwood: SED modeling using machine learning

mirkwood uses supervised machine learning to model non-linearly mapping galaxy fluxes to their properties. Multiple models are stacked to mitigate poor performance by any individual model in a given region of the parameter space. The code accounts for uncertainties arising both from intrinsic noise in observations and from finite training data and incorrect modeling assumptions, and provides highly accurate physical properties from observations of galaxies as compared to traditional SED fitting.

[ascl:1110.025] MIS: A Miriad Interferometry Singledish Toolkit

MIS is a pipeline toolkit using the package MIRIAD to combine Interferometric and Single Dish data. This was prompted by our observations made with the Combined Array For Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) interferometer of the star-forming region NGC 1333, a large survey highlighting the new 23-element and singledish observing modes. The project consists of 20 CARMA datasets each containing interferometric as well as simultaneously obtained single dish data, for 3 molecular spectral lines and continuum, in 527 different pointings, covering an area of about 8 by 11 arcminutes. A small group of collaborators then shared this toolkit and their parameters via CVS, and scripts were developed to ensure uniform data reduction across the group. The pipeline was run end-to-end each night that new observations were obtained, producing maps that contained all the data to date. This approach could serve as a model for repeated calibration and mapping of large mixed-mode correlation datasets from ALMA.

[ascl:1010.062] MissFITS: Basic Maintenance and Packaging Tasks on FITS Files

MissFITS is a program that performs basic maintenance and packaging tasks on FITS files using an optimized FITS library. MissFITS can:

- add, edit, and remove FITS header keywords;
- split and join Multi-Extension-FITS (MEF) files;
- unpile and pile FITS data-cubes; and,
- create, check, and update FITS checksums, using R. Seaman’s protocol.

[ascl:1505.011] missForest: Nonparametric missing value imputation using random forest

missForest imputes missing values particularly in the case of mixed-type data. It uses a random forest trained on the observed values of a data matrix to predict the missing values. It can be used to impute continuous and/or categorical data including complex interactions and non-linear relations. It yields an out-of-bag (OOB) imputation error estimate without the need of a test set or elaborate cross-validation and can be run in parallel to save computation time. missForest has been used to, among other things, impute variable star colors in an All-Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) dataset of variable stars with no NOMAD match.

[ascl:1910.016] MiSTree: Construct and analyze Minimum Spanning Tree graphs

MiSTree quickly constructs minimum spanning tree graphs for various coordinate systems, including Celestial coordinates, by using a k-nearest neighbor graph (k NN, rather than a matrix of pairwise distances) which is then fed to Kruskal's algorithm to create the graph. MiSTree bins the MST statistics into histograms and plots the distributions; enabling the inclusion of high-order statistics information from the cosmic web to provide additional information that improves cosmological parameter constraints. Though MiSTree was designed for use in cosmology, it can be used in any field requiring extracting non-Gaussian information from point distributions.

[ascl:2112.008] MISTTBORN: MCMC Interface for Synthesis of Transits, Tomography, Binaries, and Others of a Relevant Nature

MISTTBORN can simultaneously fit multiple types of data within an MCMC framework. It handles photometric transit/eclipse, radial velocity, Doppler tomographic, or individual line profile data, for an arbitrary number of datasets in an arbitrary number of photometric bands for an arbitrary number of planets and allows the use of Gaussian process regression to handle correlated noise in photometric or Doppler tomographic data. The code can include dilution due to a nearby unresolved star in the transit fits, and an additional line component due to another star or scattered sun/moonlight in Doppler tomographic or line profile fits. It can also be used for eclipsing binary fits, including a secondary eclipse and radial velocities for both stars. MISTTBORN produces diagnostic plots showing the data and best-fit models and the associated code MISTTBORNPLOTTER produces publication-quality plots and tables.

[ascl:2306.029] Mixclask: Mixing Cloudy and SKIRT

Mixclask combines Cloudy (ascl:9910.001) and SKIRT (ascl:1109.003) to predict spectra and gas properties in astrophysical contexts, such as galaxies and HII regions. The main output is the mean intensity of a region filled with stars, gas and dust at different positions, assuming axial symmetry. The inputs for Mixclask are the stellar and ISM data for each region and an file for the positions (x,y,z) that will be output.

[ascl:1409.001] mixT: single-temperature fit for a multi-component thermal plasma

mixT accurately predicts T derived from a single-temperature fit for a multi-component thermal plasma. It can be applied in the deprojection analysis of objects with the temperature and metallicity gradients, for correction of the PSF effects, for consistent comparison of numerical simulations of galaxy clusters and groups with the X-ray observations, and for estimating how emission from undetected components can bias the global X-ray spectral analysis.

[ascl:1206.010] mkj_libs: Helper routines for plane-fitting & analysis tools

mkj_libs provides a set of helper routines (vector operations, astrometry, statistical analysis of spherical data) for the main plane-fitting and analysis tools.

[ascl:0104.001] MLAPM: Simulating Structure Formation from Collisionless Matter

MLAPM simulates structure formation from collisionless matter. The code, written in C, is purely grid-based and uses a recursively refined Cartesian grid to solve Poisson's equation for the potential, rather than obtaining the potential from a Green's function. Refinements can have arbitrary shapes and in practice closely follow the complex morphology of the density field that evolves. The timestep shortens by a factor two with each successive refinement. It is argued that an appropriate choice of softening length is of great importance and that the softening should be at all points an appropriate multiple of the local inter-particle separation. Unlike tree and P3M codes, multigrid codes automatically satisfy this requirement.

[ascl:2012.005] MLC_ELGs: Machine Learning Classifiers for intermediate redshift Emission Line Galaxies

MLC_EPGs classifies intermediate redshift (z = 0.3–0.8) emission line galaxies as star-forming galaxies, composite galaxies, active galactic nuclei (AGN), or low-ionization nuclear emission regions (LINERs). It uses four supervised machine learning classification algorithms: k-nearest neighbors (KNN), support vector classifier (SVC), random forest (RF), and a multi-layer perceptron (MLP) neural network. For input features, it uses properties that can be measured from optical galaxy spectra out to z < 0.8—[O III]/Hβ, [O II]/Hβ, [O III] line width, and stellar velocity dispersion—and four colors (u−g, g−r, r−i, and i−z) corrected to z = 0.1.

[ascl:2009.010] MLG: Microlensing with Gaia

MLG simulates Gaia measurements for predicted astrometric microlensing events. It fits the motion of the lens and source simultaneously and reconstructs the 11 parameters of the lensing event. For lenses passing by multiple background sources, it also fits the motion of all background sources and the lens simultaneously. A Monte-Carlo simulation is used to determine the achievable precision of the mass determination.

[ascl:1403.003] MLZ: Machine Learning for photo-Z

The parallel Python framework MLZ (Machine Learning and photo-Z) computes fast and robust photometric redshift PDFs using Machine Learning algorithms. It uses a supervised technique with prediction trees and random forest through TPZ that can be used for a regression or a classification problem, or a unsupervised methods with self organizing maps and random atlas called SOMz. These machine learning implementations can be efficiently combined into a more powerful one resulting in robust and accurate probability distributions for photometric redshifts.

[ascl:2205.024] MM-LSD: Multi-Mask Least-Squares Deconvolution

MM-LSD (Multi-Mask Least-Squares Deconvolution) performs continuum normalization of 2D spectra (echelle order spectra). It also masks and partially corrects telluric lines and extracts RVs from spectra. The code requires RASSINE (ascl:2102.022) and uses spectral line data from VALD3.

[ascl:1412.010] MMAS: Make Me A Star

Make Me A Star (MMAS) quickly generates stellar collision remnants and can be used in combination with realistic dynamical simulations of star clusters that include stellar collisions. The code approximates the merger process (including shock heating, hydrodynamic mixing, mass ejection, and angular momentum transfer) with simple algorithms based on conservation laws and a basic qualitative understanding of the hydrodynamics. These simple models agree very well with those from SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics) calculations of stellar collisions, and the subsequent stellar evolution of these models also matches closely that of the more accurate hydrodynamic models.

[ascl:1905.005] MMIRS-DRP: MMIRS Data Reduction Pipeline

The MMIRS data reduction pipeline provides complete and flexible data reduction for long-slit and multi-slit spectroscopic observations collected using the MMT and Magellan Infrared Spectrograph (MMIRS). Written in IDL, it offers sky subtraction, correction for telluric absorpition, and is fast enough to permit real-time data reduction for quality control.

[ascl:2307.012] mnms: Map-based Noise ModelS

mnms (Map-based Noise ModelS) creates map-based models of Simons Observatory Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) data. Each model supports drawing map-based simulations from data splits with independent realizations of the noise or equivalent, similar to an independent set of time-domain sims. In addition to the ability to create on-the-fly simulations, mnms also includes ready-made scripts for writing a large batch of products to disk in a dedicated SLURM job.

[ascl:2104.012] Mo'Astro: MongoDB framework for observational astronomy

Mo’Astro is a MongoDB framework for observational astronomy pipelines. Mo'Astro sets up a MongoDB collection of a survey's image set, keeping FITS metadata readily available, and providing a place in the reduction pipeline to persist metadata. Mo’Astro also provides facilities for batch processing images with the Astromatic tool suite, and for hosting a local 2MASS star catalog with spatial-search built-in.

[ascl:2306.010] MOBSE: Massive Objects in Binary Stellar Evolution

MOBSE investigates the demography of merging BHBs. A customized version of the binary stellar evolution code BSE (ascl:1303.014), MOBSE includes metallicity-dependent prescriptions for mass-loss of massive hot stars and upgrades for the evolution of single and binary massive stars.

[ascl:1110.010] MOCASSIN: MOnte CArlo SimulationS of Ionized Nebulae

MOCASSIN is a fully 3D or 2D photoionisation and dust radiative transfer code which employs a Monte Carlo approach to the transfer of radiation through media of arbitrary geometry and density distribution. Written in Fortran, it was originally developed for the modelling of photoionised regions like HII regions and planetary nebulae and has since expanded and been applied to a variety of astrophysical problems, including modelling clumpy dusty supernova envelopes, star forming galaxies, protoplanetary disks and inner shell fluorence emission in the photospheres of stars and disk atmospheres. The code can deal with arbitrary Cartesian grids of variable resolution, it has successfully been used to model complex density fields from SPH calculations and can deal with ionising radiation extending from Lyman edge to the X-ray. The dust and gas microphysics is fully coupled both in the radiation transfer and in the thermal balance.

[ascl:2306.020] mockFRBhosts: Limiting the visibility and follow-up of FRB host galaxies

mockFRBhosts estimates the fraction of FRB hosts that can be cataloged with redshifts by existing and future optical surveys. The package uses frbpoppy (ascl:1911.009) to generate a population of FRBs for a given radio telescope. For each FRB, a host galaxy is drawn from a data base generated by GALFORM (ascl:1510.005). The galaxies' magnitudes in different photometric surveys are calculated as are the number of bands in which they are detected. mockFRBhosts also calculates the follow-up time in a 10-m optical telescope required to do photometry or spectroscopy and provides a simple interface to Bayesian inference methods via MCMC simulations provided in the FRB package (ascl:2306.018).

[ascl:2106.025] ModeChord: Primordial scalar and tensor power spectra solver

ModeChord computes the primordial scalar and tensor power spectra for single field inflationary models. The code solves the inflationary mode equations numerically, avoiding the slow roll approximation. It provides an efficient and robust numerical evaluation of the inflationary perturbation spectrum, and allows the free parameters in the inflationary potential to be estimated. ModeChord also allows the estimation of reheating uncertainties once a potential has been specified.

[ascl:1010.009] ModeCode: Bayesian Parameter Estimation for Inflation

ModeCode is a publicly available code that computes the primordial scalar and tensor power spectra for single field inflationary models. ModeCode solves the inflationary mode equations numerically, avoiding the slow roll approximation. It provides an efficient and robust numerical evaluation of the inflationary perturbation spectrum, and allows the free parameters in the inflationary potential to be estimated within an MCMC computation. ModeCode also allows the estimation of reheating uncertainties once a potential has been specified. It is interfaced with CAMB and CosmoMC to compute cosmic microwave background angular power spectra and perform likelihood analysis and parameter estimation. It can be run as a standalone code as well. Errors in the results from ModeCode contribute negligibly to the error budget for analyses of data from Planck or other next generation experiments.

[ascl:1109.023] MOKA: A New Tool for Strong Lensing Studies

MOKA simulates the gravitational lensing signal from cluster-sized haloes. This algorithm implements recent results from numerical simulations to create realistic lenses with properties independent of numerical resolution and can be used for studies of the strong lensing cross section in dependence of halo structure.

[ascl:1501.013] Molecfit: Telluric absorption correction tool

Molecfit corrects astronomical observations for atmospheric absorption features based on fitting synthetic transmission spectra to the astronomical data, which saves a significant amount of valuable telescope time and increases the instrumental efficiency. Molecfit can also estimate molecular abundances, especially the water vapor content of the Earth’s atmosphere. The tool can be run from a command-line or more conveniently through a GUI.

[ascl:1212.004] MOLIERE-5: Forward and inversion model for sub-mm wavelengths

MOLIERE-5 (Microwave Observation LIne Estimation and REtrieval) is a versatile forward and inversion model for the millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths range and includes an inversion model. The MOLIERE-5 forward model includes modules for the calculation of absorption coefficients, radiative transfer, and instrumental characteristics. The radiative transfer model is supplemented by a sensitivity module for estimating the contribution to the spectrum of each catalog line at its center frequency enabling the model to effectively filter for small spectral lines. The instrument model consists of several independent modules, including the calculation of the convolution of spectra and weighting functions with the spectrometer response functions. The instrument module also provides several options for modeling of frequency-switched observations. The MOLIERE-5 inversion model calculates linear Optimal Estimation, a least-squares retrieval method which uses statistical apriori knowledge on the retrieved parameters for the regularization of ill-posed inversion problems and computes diagnostics such as the measurement and smoothing error covariance matrices along with contribution and averaging kernel functions.

[ascl:1907.012] molly: 1D astronomical spectra analyzer

molly analyzes 1D astronomical spectra. Its prime purpose is for handling large numbers of similar spectra (e.g., time series spectroscopy), but it contains many of the standard operations used for normal spectrum analysis as well. It overlaps with the various similar programs such as dipso (ascl:1405.016) and has strengths (particularly for time series spectra) and weaknesses compared to them.

[ascl:1206.004] MOLSCAT: MOLecular SCATtering v. 14

MOLSCAT version 14 is a FORTRAN code for quantum mechanical (coupled channel) solution of the nonreactive molecular scattering problem and was developed to obtain collision rates for molecules in the interstellar gas which are needed to understand microwave and infrared astronomical observations. The code is implemented for various types of collision partners. In addition to the essentially exact close coupling method several approximate methods, including the Coupled States and Infinite Order Sudden approximations, are provided. This version of the code has been superseded by MOLSCAT 2020 (ascl:2010.001).

[ascl:1908.002] Molsoft: Molonglo Telescope Observing Software

Molsoft operates, monitors and schedules observations, both through predetermined schedule files and fully dynamically, at the refurbished Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Radio Telescope (MOST). It was developed as part of the UTMOST upgrade of the facility. The software runs a large-scale pulsar timing program; the autonomous observing system and the dynamic scheduler have increased the observing efficiency by a factor of 2-3 in comparison with static scheduling.

[ascl:2311.006] MONDPMesh: Particle-mesh code for Milgromian dynamics

MONDPMesh provides a particle-mesh method to calculate the time evolution of an system of point masses under modified gravity, namely the AQUAL formalism. This is done by transforming the Poisson equation for the potential into a system of four linear PDEs, and solving these using fast Fourier transforms. The accelerations on the point masses are calculated from this potential, and the system is propagated using Leapfrog integration. The time complexity of the code is O(N⋅p⋅log(p)) for p pixels and N particles, which is the same as for a Newtonian particle-mesh code.

[ascl:2204.020] MonoTools: Planets of uncertain periods detector and modeler

MonoTools detects, vets, and models transiting exoplanets, with a specific emphasis on monotransiting planets and those with unknown periods. It includes scripts specifically for searching and assessing a lightcurve for the presence of monotransits. MonoTools can also performing a best-fit transit model, determine whether transits are linked to any detected multi-transiting planet candidate or with each other, and can fit planets in a Bayesian way to account for uncertain periods, lightcurve gaps, and stellar variability, among other things.

[ascl:1010.036] Montage: An Astronomical Image Mosaicking Toolkit

Montage is an open source code toolkit for assembling Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) images into custom mosaics. It runs on all common Linux/Unix platforms, on desktops, clusters and computational grids, and supports all World Coordinate System (WCS) projections and common coordinate systems. Montage preserves spatial and calibration fidelity of input images, processes 40 million pixels in up to 32 minutes on 128 nodes on a Linux cluster, and provides independent engines for analyzing the geometry of images on the sky, re-projecting images, rectifying background emission to a common level, and co-adding images. It offers convenient tools for managing and manipulating large image files.

[ascl:1502.006] Montblanc: GPU accelerated Radio Interferometer Measurement Equations in support of Bayesian Inference for Radio Observations

Montblanc, written in Python, is a GPU implementation of the Radio interferometer measurement equation (RIME) in support of the Bayesian inference for radio observations (BIRO) technique. The parameter space that BIRO explores results in tens of thousands of computationally expensive RIME evaluations before reduction to a single X2 value. The RIME is calculated over four dimensions, time, baseline, channel and source and the values in this 4D space can be independently calculated; therefore, the RIME is particularly amenable to a parallel implementation accelerated by Graphics Programming Units (GPUs). Montblanc is implemented for NVIDIA's CUDA architecture and outperforms MeqTrees (ascl:1209.010) and OSKAR.

[ascl:1307.002] Monte Python: Monte Carlo code for CLASS in Python

Monte Python is a parameter inference code which combines the flexibility of the python language and the robustness of the cosmological code CLASS (ascl:1106.020) into a simple and easy to manipulate Monte Carlo Markov Chain code.

This version has been archived and replaced by MontePython 3 (ascl:1805.027).

[ascl:1805.027] MontePython 3: Parameter inference code for cosmology

MontePython 3 provides numerous ways to explore parameter space using Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) sampling, including Metropolis-Hastings, Nested Sampling, Cosmo Hammer, and a Fisher sampling method. This improved version of the Monte Python (ascl:1307.002) parameter inference code for cosmology offers new ingredients that improve the performance of Metropolis-Hastings sampling, speeding up convergence and offering significant time improvement in difficult runs. Additional likelihoods and plotting options are available, as are post-processing algorithms such as Importance Sampling and Adding Derived Parameter.

[ascl:2308.001] MOOG_SCAT: Scattering version of the MOOG Line Transfer Code

MOOG_SCAT, a redevelopment of the LTE radiative transfer code MOOG (ascl:1202.009), contains modifications that allow for the treatment of isotropic, coherent scattering in stars. MOOG_SCAT employs a modified form of the source function and solves radiative transfer with a short charactersitics approach and an acclerated lambda iteration scheme.

[ascl:1202.009] MOOG: LTE line analysis and spectrum synthesis

MOOG performs a variety of LTE line analysis and spectrum synthesis tasks. The typical use of MOOG is to assist in the determination of the chemical composition of a star. The basic equations of LTE stellar line analysis are followed. The coding is in various subroutines that are called from a few driver routines; these routines are written in standard FORTRAN. The standard MOOG version has been developed on unix, linux and macintosh computers.

One of the chief assets of MOOG is its ability to do on-line graphics. The plotting commands are given within the FORTRAN code. MOOG uses the graphics package SM, chosen for its ease of implementation in FORTRAN codes. Plotting calls are concentrated in just a few routines, and it should be possible for users of other graphics packages to substitute other appropriate FORTRAN commands.

[ascl:1308.018] MoogStokes: Zeeman polarized radiative transfer

MOOGStokes is a version of the MOOG one-dimensional local thermodynamic equilibrium radiative transfer code that incorporates a Stokes vector treatment of polarized radiation through a magnetic medium. It consists of three complementary programs that together can synthesize the disk-averaged emergent spectrum of a star with a magnetic field. The MOOGStokes package synthesizes emergent spectra of stars with magnetic fields in a familiar computational framework and produces disk-averaged spectra for all Stokes vectors ( I, Q, U, V ), normalized by the continuum.

[ascl:1111.006] MOPEX: MOsaicker and Point source EXtractor

MOPEX (MOsaicker and Point source EXtractor) is a package for reducing and analyzing imaging data, as well as MIPS SED data. MOPEX includes the point source extraction package, APEX.
MOPEX is designed to allow the user to:

  • perform sophisticated background matching of individual data frames
  • mosaic the individual frames downloaded from the Spitzer archive
  • perform both temporal and spatial outlier rejection during mosaicking
  • apply offline pointing refinement for MIPS data (refinement is already applied to IRAC data)
  • perform source detection on the mosaics using APEX
  • compute aperture photometry or PRF-fitting photometry for point sources
  • perform interpolation, coaddition, and spectrum extraction of MIPS SED images.
MOPEX comes in two different interfaces (GUI and command-line), both of which come packaged together. We recommend that all new users start with the GUI, which is more user-friendly than the command-line interface

[ascl:1303.011] MOPSIC: Extended Version of MOPSI

MOPSIC was created to analyze bolometer data but can be used for much more versatile tasks. It is an extension of MOPSI; this software had been merged with the command interpreter of GILDAS (ascl:1305.010). For data reduction, MOPSIC uses a special method to calculate the chopped signal. This gives much better results than the straight difference of the signals obtained at both chopper positions. In addition there are also scripts to reduce pointings, skydips, and to calculate the RCPs (Receiver Channel Parameters) from calibration maps. MOPSIC offers a much broader range of applications including advanced planning functions for mapping and onoff observations, post-reduction data analysis and processing and even reduction of non-bolometer data (optical, IR, spectroscopy).

[ascl:1911.014] MORDI: Massively-Overlapped Ring-Diagram Inversion

MORDI (Massively-Overlapped Ring-Diagram Inversion) performs three-dimensional ring-diagram inversions. The code reads in frequency shift measurements and their associated sensitivity kernels and outputs two-dimensional slices of the subsurface flow field at a constant depth and (optionally) the associated averaging kernels. It relies on both distributed-memory (MPI) and shared-memory (OpenMP) parallelism to scale efficiently up to a few thousand processors, but can also run reasonably well on small machines (1-4 cpus). The actions of the code are modified by command-line parameters, which enable a significant amount of flexibility when setting up an inversion.

[ascl:1906.013] MORPHEUS: A 3D Eulerian Godunov MPI-OpenMP hydrodynamics code with multiple grid geometries

MORPHEUS (Manchester Omni-geometRical Program for Hydrodynamical EUlerian Simulations) is a 3D hydrodynamical code used to simulate astrophysical fluid flows. It has three different grid geometries (cartesian, spherical, and cylindrical) and uses a second-order Godunov method to solve the equations of hydrodynamics. Physical modules also include radiative cooling and gravity, and a hybrid MPI-OpenMP parallelization allows computations to be run on large-scale architectures. MORPHEUS is written in Fortran90 and does not require any libraries (apart from MPI) to run.

[ascl:1906.012] Morpheus: Library to generate morphological semantic segmentation maps of astronomical images

Morpheus generates pixel level morphological classifications of astronomical sources by leveraging advances in deep learning to perform source detection, source segmentation, and morphological classification pixel-by-pixel via a semantic segmentation algorithm adopted from the field of computer vision. By utilizing morphological information about the flux of real astronomical sources during object detection, Morpheus shows resiliency to false positive identifications of sources.

[ascl:2303.018] MORPHOFIT: Morphological analysis of galaxies

MORPHOFIT consists of a series of modules for estimating galaxy structural parameters. The package uses SEXTRACTOR (ascl:1010.064) in forced photometry mode to get an initial estimate of the galaxy structural parameters and create a multiband catalog. It also uses GALFIT (ascl:1010.064), running it on galaxy stamps and galaxy regions from the parent image and also on galaxies from the full image using SEXTRACTOR properties as input. MORPHOFIT has been optimized and tested in both low-density and crowded environments, and can recover the input structural parameters of galaxies with good accuracy.

[ascl:2102.020] MOSAIC: Multipole operator generator for Fast Multipole Method operators

MOSAIC (Multipole Operators in Symbols, Automatically Improved and Condensed) automatically produces, verifies, and optimizes computer code for Fast Multipole Method (FMM) operators. It is based on a symbolic algebra library, and can produce code for any expansion order and be extended to use any basis or kernel function. The code applies algebraic modifications to reduce the number of floating-point operations and can symbolically verify correctness.

[ascl:1908.007] MosfireDRP: MOSFIRE Data Reduction Pipeline

MosfireDRP reduces data from the MOSFIRE spectrograph of the Keck Observatory; it produces flat-fielded, wavelength calibrated, rectified, and stacked 2D spectrograms for each slit on a given mask in nearly real time. Background subtraction is performed in two states: a simple pairwise subtraction of interleaved stacks, and then fitting a 2D b-spline model to the background residuals.

[ascl:1710.006] MOSFiT: Modular Open-Source Fitter for Transients

MOSFiT (Modular Open-Source Fitter for Transients) downloads transient datasets from open online catalogs (e.g., the Open Supernova Catalog), generates Monte Carlo ensembles of semi-analytical light curve fits to those datasets and their associated Bayesian parameter posteriors, and optionally delivers the fitting results back to those same catalogs to make them available to the rest of the community. MOSFiT helps bridge the gap between observations and theory in time-domain astronomy; in addition to making the application of existing models and creation of new models as simple as possible, MOSFiT yields statistically robust predictions for transient characteristics, with a standard output format that includes all the setup information necessary to reproduce a given result.

[ascl:1611.003] MPDAF: MUSE Python Data Analysis Framework

MPDAF, the MUSE Python Data Analysis Framework, provides tools to work with MUSE-specific data (for example, raw data and pixel tables), and with more general data such as spectra, images, and data cubes. Originally written to work with MUSE data, it can also be used for other data, such as that from the Hubble Space Telescope. MPDAF also provides MUSELET, a SExtractor-based tool to detect emission lines in a data cube, and a format to gather all the information on a source in one FITS file. MPDAF was developed and is maintained by CRAL (Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon).

[ascl:1208.019] MPFIT: Robust non-linear least squares curve fitting

These IDL routines provide a robust and relatively fast way to perform least-squares curve and surface fitting. The algorithms are translated from MINPACK-1, which is a rugged minimization routine found on Netlib, and distributed with permission. This algorithm is more desirable than CURVEFIT because it is generally more stable and less likely to crash than the brute-force approach taken by CURVEFIT, which is based upon Numerical Recipes.

[ascl:1304.014] MPgrafic: A parallel MPI version of Grafic-1

MPgrafic is a parallel MPI version of Grafic-1 (ascl:9910.004) which can produce large cosmological initial conditions on a cluster without requiring shared memory. The real Fourier transforms are carried in place using fftw while minimizing the amount of used memory (at the expense of performance) in the spirit of Grafic-1. The writing of the output file is also carried in parallel. In addition to the technical parallelization, it provides three extensions over Grafic-1:

  • it can produce power spectra with baryon wiggles (DJ Eisenstein and W. Hu, Ap. J. 496);
  • it has the optional ability to load a lower resolution noise map corresponding to the low frequency component which will fix the larger scale modes of the simulation (extra flag 0/1 at the end of the input process) in the spirit of Grafic-2 (ascl:1106.008);
  • it can be used in conjunction with constrfield, which generates initial conditions phases from a list of local constraints on density, tidal field density gradient and velocity.

[ascl:1712.002] MPI_XSTAR: MPI-based parallelization of XSTAR program

MPI_XSTAR parallelizes execution of multiple XSTAR runs using Message Passing Interface (MPI). XSTAR (ascl:9910.008), part of the HEASARC's HEAsoft (ascl:1408.004) package, calculates the physical conditions and emission spectra of ionized gases. MPI_XSTAR invokes XSTINITABLE from HEASoft to generate a job list of XSTAR commands for given physical parameters. The job list is used to make directories in ascending order, where each individual XSTAR is spawned on each processor and outputs are saved. HEASoft's XSTAR2TABLE program is invoked upon the contents of each directory in order to produce table model FITS files for spectroscopy analysis tools.

[ascl:1208.014] MPI-AMRVAC: MPI-Adaptive Mesh Refinement-Versatile Advection Code

MPI-AMRVAC is an MPI-parallelized Adaptive Mesh Refinement code, with some heritage (in the solver part) to the Versatile Advection Code or VAC, initiated by Gábor Tóth at the Astronomical Institute at Utrecht in November 1994, with help from Rony Keppens since 1996. Previous incarnations of the Adaptive Mesh Refinement version of VAC were of restricted use only, and have been used for basic research in AMR strategies, or for well-targeted applications. This MPI version uses a full octree block-based approach, and allows for general orthogonal coordinate systems. MPI-AMRVAC aims to advance any system of (primarily hyperbolic) partial differential equations by a number of different numerical schemes. The emphasis is on (near) conservation laws, with shock-dominated problems as a main research target. The actual equations are stored in separate modules, can be added if needed, and they can be selected by a simple configuration of the VACPP preprocessor. The dimensionality of the problem is also set through VACPP. The numerical schemes are able to handle discontinuities and smooth flows as well.

[ascl:1106.022] MPI-Defrost: Extension of Defrost to MPI-based Cluster Environment

MPI-Defrost extends Frolov’s Defrost (ascl:1011.012) to an MPI-based cluster environment. This version has been restricted to a single field. Restoring two-field support should be straightforward, but will require some code changes. Some output options may also not be fully supported under MPI.

This code was produced to support our own work, and has been made available for the benefit of anyone interested in either oscillon simulations or an MPI capable version of Defrost, and it is provided on an "as-is" basis. Andrei Frolov is the primary developer of Defrost and we thank him for placing his work under the GPL (GNU Public License), and thus allowing us to distribute this modified version.

[ascl:2007.008] MPSolve: Multiprecision Polynomial SOLVEr

MPSolve (Multiprecision Polynomial SOLVEr) provides an easy-to-use universal blackbox for solving polynomials and secular equations. Its features include arbitrary precision approximation and guaranteed inclusion radii for the results. It can exploit polynomial structures, taking advantage of sparsity as well as coefficients in a particular domain (i.e., integers or rationals), and can be specialized for specific classes of polynomials.

[ascl:1212.003] MPWide: Light-weight communication library for distributed computing

MPWide is a light-weight communication library for distributed computing. It is specifically developed to allow message passing over long-distance networks using path-specific optimizations. An early version of MPWide was used in the Gravitational Billion Body Project to allow simulations across multiple supercomputers.

[ascl:1912.020] MRExo: Non-parametric mass-radius relationship for exoplanets

MRExo performs non-parametric fitting and analysis of the mass-radius (M-R) relationship for exoplanets. Written in Python, it offers tools for fitting the M-R relationship to a given data set and also includes predicting (M->R, and R->M) and plotting functions.

[ascl:1102.005] MRLENS: Multi-Resolution methods for gravitational LENSing

The MRLENS package offers a new method for the reconstruction of weak lensing mass maps. It uses the multiscale entropy concept, which is based on wavelets, and the False Discovery Rate which allows us to derive robust detection levels in wavelet space. We show that this new restoration approach outperforms several standard techniques currently used for weak shear mass reconstruction. This method can also be used to separate E and B modes in the shear field, and thus test for the presence of residual systematic effects. We concentrate on large blind cosmic shear surveys, and illustrate our results using simulated shear maps derived from N-Body Lambda-CDM simulations with added noise corresponding to both ground-based and space-based observations.

[ascl:1809.015] MrMoose: Multi-Resolution Multi-Object/Origin Spectral Energy distribution fitting procedure

MrMoose (Multi-Resolution Multi-Object/Origin Spectral Energy) fits user-defined models onto a set of multi-wavelength data using a Bayesian framework. The code can handle blended sources, large variation in resolution, and even upper limits consistently. It also generates a series of outputs allowing for an quick interpretation of the results. The code uses emcee (ascl:1303.002), and saves the emcee sampler object, thus allowing users to transfer the output to a personal graphical interface.

[ascl:1802.015] mrpy: Renormalized generalized gamma distribution for HMF and galaxy ensemble properties comparisons

mrpy calculates the MRP parameterization of the Halo Mass Function. It calculates basic statistics of the truncated generalized gamma distribution (TGGD) with the TGGD class, including mean, mode, variance, skewness, pdf, and cdf. It generates MRP quantities with the MRP class, such as differential number counts and cumulative number counts, and offers various methods for generating normalizations. It can generate the MRP-based halo mass function as a function of physical parameters via the mrp_b13 function, and fit MRP parameters to data in the form of arbitrary curves and in the form of a sample of variates with the SimFit class. mrpy also calculates analytic hessians and jacobians at any point, and allows the user to alternate parameterizations of the same form via the reparameterize module.

[ascl:1504.016] MRrelation: Posterior predictive mass distribution

MRrelation calculates the posterior predictive mass distribution for an individual planet. The probabilistic mass-radius relationship (M-R relation) is evaluated within a Bayesian framework, which both quantifies this intrinsic dispersion and the uncertainties on the M-R relation parameters.

[submitted] MRS: The MOS Reduction Software

The MRS (The MOS Reduction Software) suite reduces the spectra taken with the multi-object spectrograph spectra used as the focal plane instrument of RTT150 telescope in the TÜBİTAK National Observatory.

[ascl:1112.010] MRS3D: 3D Spherical Wavelet Transform on the Sphere

Future cosmological surveys will provide 3D large scale structure maps with large sky coverage, for which a 3D Spherical Fourier-Bessel (SFB) analysis is natural. Wavelets are particularly well-suited to the analysis and denoising of cosmological data, but a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform does not currently exist to analyse spherical 3D data. We present a new fast Discrete Spherical Fourier-Bessel Transform (DSFBT) based on both a discrete Bessel Transform and the HEALPIX angular pixelisation scheme. We tested the 3D wavelet transform and as a toy-application, applied a denoising algorithm in wavelet space to the Virgo large box cosmological simulations and found we can successfully remove noise without much loss to the large scale structure. The new spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform, called MRS3D, is ideally suited to analysing and denoising future 3D spherical cosmological surveys; it uses a novel discrete spherical Fourier-Bessel Transform. MRS3D is based on two packages, IDL and Healpix and can be used only if these two packages have been installed.

[ascl:2009.024] MSL: Mining for Substructure Lenses

MSL applies simulation-based inference techniques to the problem of substructure inference in galaxy-galaxy strong lenses. It leverages additional information extracted from the simulator, then trains neural networks to estimate likelihood ratios associated with population-level parameters characterizing dark matter substructure. The package including five high-level scripts which run the simulation and create samples, combing multiple simulation runs into a single file to use for training, then train the neural networks. After training, the estimated likelihood ratio is tested, and calibrated network predictions are made based on histograms of the network output.

[ascl:1709.007] MSSC: Multi-Source Self-Calibration

Multi-Source Self-Calibration (MSSC) provides direction-dependent calibration to standard phase referencing. The code combines multiple faint sources detected within the primary beam to derive phase corrections. Each source has its CLEAN model divided into the visibilities which results in multiple point sources that are stacked in the uv plane to increase the S/N, thus permitting self-calibration. This process applies only to wide-field VLBI data sets that detect and image multiple sources within one epoch.

[ascl:2102.002] MST: Minimum Spanning Tree algorithm for identifying large-scale filaments

MST (Minimum Spanning Tree) identifies velocity coherent large-scale filaments through ATLASGAL clumps. It can also isolate filaments embedded in a crowded position–position–velocity (PPV) space. One strength of this method is its repeatability compared to manual approaches.

[ascl:1701.006] MSWAVEF: Momentum-Space Wavefunctions

MSWAVEF calculates hydrogenic and non-hydrogenic momentum-space electronic wavefunctions. Such wavefunctions are often required to calculate various collision processes, such as excitation and line broadening cross sections. The hydrogenic functions are calculated using the standard analytical expressions. The non-hydrogenic functions are calculated within quantum defect theory according to the method of Hoang Binh and van Regemorter (1997). Required Hankel transforms have been determined analytically for angular momentum quantum numbers ranging from zero to 13 using Mathematica. Calculations for higher angular momentum quantum numbers are possible, but slow (since calculated numerically). The code is written in IDL.

[ascl:2212.005] MTNeedlet: Spherical maps filtering

MTNeedlet uses needlets to filter spherical (Healpix) maps and detect and analyze the maxima population using a multiple testing approach. It has been developed with the CMB in mind, but it can be applied to other spherical maps. It pivots around three basic steps: 1.) The calculation of several types of needlets and their possible use to filter maps; 2.) The detection of maxima (or minima) on spherical maps, their visualization and basic analysis; and 3.) The multiple testing approach in order to detect anomalies in the maxima population of the maps with respect to the expected behavior for a random Gaussian map. MTNeedlet relies on Healpy (ascl:2008.022) to efficiently deal with spherical maps.

[ascl:1710.011] mTransport: Two-point-correlation function calculator

mTransport computes the 2-point-correlation function of the curvature and tensor perturbations in multifield models of inflation in the presence of a curved field space. It is a Mathematica implementation of the transport method which encompasses scenarios with violations of slow-roll conditions and turns of the trajectory in field space. It can be used for an arbitrary mass spectrum, including massive modes, particle production and models with quasi-single-field dynamics.

[ascl:1811.012] muLAn: gravitational MICROlensing Analysis Software

muLAn analyzes and fits light curves of gravitational microlensing events. The code includes all classical microlensing models (for example, single and binary microlenses, ground- and space-based parallax effects, orbital motion, finite-source effects, and limb-darkening); these can be combined into several time intervals of the analyzed light curve. Minimization methods include an Affine-Invariant Ensemble Sampler to generate a multivariate proposal function while running several Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) chains, for the set of parameters which is chosen to be fit; non-fitting parameters can be either kept fixed or set on a grid defined by the user. Furthermore, the software offers a model-free option to align all data sets together and allow inspection the light curve before any modeling work. It also comes with many useful routines (export publication-quality figures, data formatting and cleaning) and state-of-the-art statistical tools.

Modeling results can be interpreted using an interactive html page which contains all information about the light curve model, caustics, source trajectory, best-fit parameters and chi-square. Parameters uncertainties and statistical properties (such as multi-modal features of the posterior density) can be assessed from correlation plots. The code is modular, allowing the addition of other computation or minimization routines by directly adding their Python files without modifying the main code. The software has been designed to be easy to use even for the newcomer in microlensing, with external, synthetic and self-explanatory setup files containing all important commands and option settings. The user may choose to launch the code through command line instructions, or to import muLAn within another Python project like any standard Python package.

[ascl:1803.006] MulensModel: Microlensing light curves modeling

MulensModel calculates light curves of microlensing events. Both single and binary lens events are modeled and various higher-order effects can be included: extended source (with limb-darkening), annual microlensing parallax, and satellite microlensing parallax. The code is object-oriented and written in Python3, and requires AstroPy (ascl:1304.002).

[ascl:2102.023] Multi_CLASS: Cross-tracer angular power spectra of number counts using CLASS

Multi_CLASS modifies the Boltzmann code CLASS (ascl:1106.020) to compute of the cross-tracer angular power spectra of the number count fluctuations for two different tracers of the underlying dark matter density field. In other words, it generalizes the standard nCl output option of CLASS to the case of two different tracers, for example, two different galaxy populations with their own redshift distribution, and galaxy and magnification bias parameters, among others.

Multi_CLASS also includes an implementation of the effect of primordial non-Gaussianities of the local type, parametrized by the parameter f_NL (following the large-scale structure convention), on the effective bias of the tracers. There is also the possibility of having a tilted non-Gaussian correction, parametrized by n_NG, with a pivot scale determined by k_pivot_NG. The package includes galaxy redshift distributions for forthcoming galaxy surveys, with the ease of choosing between them (or an input file) from the parameters input file (e.g., multi_explanatory.ini). In addition, Multi_CLASS includes the possibility of using resolved gravitational wave events as a tracer.

[ascl:1506.004] multiband_LS: Multiband Lomb-Scargle Periodograms

The multiband periodogram is a general extension of the well-known Lomb-Scargle approach for detecting periodic signals in time-domain data. In addition to advantages of the Lomb-Scargle method such as treatment of non-uniform sampling and heteroscedastic errors, the multiband periodogram significantly improves period finding for randomly sampled multiband light curves (e.g., Pan-STARRS, DES and LSST). The light curves in each band are modeled as arbitrary truncated Fourier series, with the period and phase shared across all bands.

[ascl:1909.002] MultiColorFits: Colorize and combine multiple fits images for visually aesthetic scientific plots

MultiColorFits is a tool to colorize and combine multiple fits images for making visually aesthetic scientific plots. The standard method to make color composites by combining fits images programmatically in python is to assign three images as separate red, green, and blue channels. This can produce unsatisfactory results for a variety of reasons, such as when less than three images are available, or additional images are desired to be shown. MultiColorFits breaks these limitations by allowing users to apply any color to a given image, not just red, green, or blue. Composites can then be created from an arbitrary number of images. Controls are included for stretching brightness scales with common functions.

[ascl:2207.001] MULTIGRIS: Multicomponent probabilistic grid search

MULTIGRIS (also called mgris) uses the sequential Monte Carlo method in PyMC (ascl:1506.005) to extract the posterior distributions of primary grid parameters and predict unobserved parameters/observables. The code accepts either a discrete number of components and/or continuous (e.g., power-law, normal) distributions for any given parameter. MULTIGRIS, written in Python, infers the posterior probability functions of parameters in a multidimensional potentially incomplete grid with some observational tracers defined for each parameter set. Observed values and their potentially asymmetric uncertainties are used to calculate a likelihood which, together with predefined or custom priors, produces the posterior distributions. Linear combinations of parameter sets may be used with inferred mixing weights and nearest neighbor or linear interpolation may be used to sample the parameter space.

[ascl:2106.027] MultiModeCode: Numerical exploration of multifield inflation models

MultiModeCode facilitates efficient Monte Carlo sampling of prior probabilities for inflationary model parameters and initial conditions and efficiently generates large sample-sets for inflation models with O(100) fields. The code numerically solves the equations of motion for the background and first-order perturbations of multi-field inflation models with canonical kinetic terms and arbitrary potentials, providing the adiabatic, isocurvature, and tensor power spectra at the end of inflation. For models with sum-separable potentials MultiModeCode also computes the slow-roll prediction via the δN formalism for easy model exploration and validation.

[ascl:2207.006] MultiModes: Efficiently analyze pulsating stars

MultiModes extracts the most significant frequencies of a sample of classical pulsating stars. The code takes a directory with light curves and initial parameters as input. For every light curve, the code calculates the frequencies spectrum, or periodogram, with the Fast Lomb Scargle algorithm, extracts the higher amplitude peak, and evaluates whether it is a real signal or noise. It fits frequency, amplitude, and phase through non-linear optimization, using a multisine function. This function is redefined with the new calculated parameters. MultiModes then does a simultaneous fit of a number of peaks (20 by default), subtracts them from the original signal, and goes back to the beginning of the loop with the residual, repeating the same process until the stop criterion is reached. After that, the code can filter suspicious spurious frequencies, those of low amplitude below the Rayleigh resolution, and possible combined frequencies.

[ascl:1109.006] MultiNest: Efficient and Robust Bayesian Inference

We present further development and the first public release of our multimodal nested sampling algorithm, called MultiNest. This Bayesian inference tool calculates the evidence, with an associated error estimate, and produces posterior samples from distributions that may contain multiple modes and pronounced (curving) degeneracies in high dimensions. The developments presented here lead to further substantial improvements in sampling efficiency and robustness, as compared to the original algorithm presented in Feroz & Hobson (2008), which itself significantly outperformed existing MCMC techniques in a wide range of astrophysical inference problems. The accuracy and economy of the MultiNest algorithm is demonstrated by application to two toy problems and to a cosmological inference problem focusing on the extension of the vanilla $Lambda$CDM model to include spatial curvature and a varying equation of state for dark energy. The MultiNest software is fully parallelized using MPI and includes an interface to CosmoMC (ascl:1106.025). It will also be released as part of the SuperBayeS package (ascl:1109.007) for the analysis of supersymmetric theories of particle physics.

[ascl:1109.008] Multipole Vectors: Decomposing Functions on a Sphere

We propose a novel representation of cosmic microwave anisotropy maps, where each multipole order l is represented by l unit vectors pointing in directions on the sky and an overall magnitude. These "multipole vectors and scalars" transform as vectors under rotations. Like the usual spherical harmonics, multipole vectors form an irreducible representation of the proper rotation group SO(3). However, they are related to the familiar spherical harmonic coefficients, alm, in a nonlinear way, and are therefore sensitive to different aspects of the CMB anisotropy. Nevertheless, it is straightforward to determine the multipole vectors for a given CMB map and we present an algorithm to compute them. Using the WMAP full-sky maps, we perform several tests of the hypothesis that the CMB anisotropy is statistically isotropic and Gaussian random. We find that the result from comparing the oriented area of planes defined by these vectors between multipole pairs 2<=l1!=l2<=8 is inconsistent with the isotropic Gaussian hypothesis at the 99.4% level for the ILC map and at 98.9% level for the cleaned map of Tegmark et al. A particular correlation is suggested between the l=3 and l=8 multipoles, as well as several other pairs. This effect is entirely different from the now familiar planarity and alignment of the quadrupole and octupole: while the aforementioned is fairly unlikely, the multipole vectors indicate correlations not expected in Gaussian random skies that make them unusually likely. The result persists after accounting for pixel noise and after assuming a residual 10% dust contamination in the cleaned WMAP map. While the definitive analysis of these results will require more work, we hope that multipole vectors will become a valuable tool for various cosmological tests, in particular those of cosmic isotropy.

[ascl:1704.014] Multipoles: Potential gain for binary lens estimation

Multipoles, written in Python, calculates the quadrupole and hexadecapole approximations of the finite-source magnification: quadrupole (Wk,rho,Gamma) and hexadecapole (Wk,rho,Gamma). The code is efficient and faster than previously available methods, and could be generalized for use on large portions of the light curves.

[ascl:1402.006] Munipack: General astronomical image processing software

Munipack provides easy-to-use tools for all astronomical astrometry and photometry, access to Virtual Observatory as well as FITS files operations and a simple user interface along with a powerful processing engine. Its many features include a FITS images viewer that allows for basic (astronomical) operations with frames, advanced image processor supporting an infinite dynamic range and advanced color management, and astrometric calibration of images. The astrometry module uses robust statistical estimators and algorithms. The photometry module provides the classical method detection of stars and implements the aperture photometry, calibrated on the basis of photon statistics, and allows for the automatic detection and aperture photometry of stars; calibration on absolute fluxes is possible. The software also provides a standard way to correct for all the bias, dark and flat-field frames, and many other features.

[ascl:2207.013] MuSCAT2_transit_pipeline: MuSCAT2 photometry and transit analysis pipelines

MuSCAT2_transit_pipeline provides photometry and transit analysis pipelines for MuSCAT2. It consists of a set of executable scripts and two Python packages: muscat2ph for photometry, and muscat2ta for transit analysis. The MuSCAT2 photometry can be carried out using the scripts only. The transit analysis can also in most cases be done using the main transit analysis script m2fit, but the muscat2ta package also offers high-level classes that can be used to carry out more customized transit analysis as a Python script (or Jupyter notebook).

[ascl:1605.007] MUSCLE: MUltiscale Spherical-ColLapse Evolution

MUSCLE (MUltiscale Spherical ColLapse Evolution) produces low-redshift approximate N-body realizations accurate to few-Megaparsec scales. It applies a spherical-collapse prescription on multiple Gaussian-smoothed scales. It achieves higher accuracy than perturbative schemes (Zel'dovich and second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory - 2LPT), and by including the void-in-cloud process (voids in large-scale collapsing regions), solves problems with a single-scale spherical-collapse scheme.

[ascl:1610.004] MUSE-DRP: MUSE Data Reduction Pipeline

The MUSE pipeline turns the complex raw data of the MUSE integral field spectrograph into a ready-to-use datacube for scientific analysis.

[ascl:2102.012] MUSE-PSFR: PSF reconstruction for MUSE WFM-AO mode

MUSE-PSFR reconstructs a PSF for the MUSE WFM-AO mode using telemetry data from SPARTA. The algorithm conducts a Fourier analysis of the laser-assisted ground layer adaptive optics (GLAO) residual phase statistics and has been test in end-to-end simulations. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine the required accuracy in terms of input parameters. MUSE-PSFR is capable of reconstructing the critical parameters of a PSF and can be used with MUSE 3D data by all MUSE users.

[ascl:1311.011] MUSIC: MUlti-Scale Initial Conditions

MUSIC generates multi-scale initial conditions with multiple levels of refinements for cosmological ‘zoom-in’ simulations. The code uses an adaptive convolution of Gaussian white noise with a real-space transfer function kernel together with an adaptive multi-grid Poisson solver to generate displacements and velocities following first- (1LPT) or second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory (2LPT). MUSIC achieves rms relative errors of the order of 10−4 for displacements and velocities in the refinement region and thus improves in terms of errors by about two orders of magnitude over previous approaches. In addition, errors are localized at coarse-fine boundaries and do not suffer from Fourier space-induced interference ringing.

[ascl:2008.024] MUSIC2-monofonIC: 3LPT initial condition generator

The original MUSIC code (ascl:1311.011) was designed to provide initial conditions for zoom initial conditions and is limited for applications to large-scale cosmological simulations. MUSIC2-monofonIC generates high order LPT/PPT cosmological initial conditions for single resolution cosmological simulations, and can be used for rapid predictions of large-scale structure. MUSIC2-monofonIC offers support for up to 3rd order Lagrangian perturbation theory, PPT (Semiclassical PT for Eulerian grids) up to 2nd order, and for mixed CDM+baryon sims. It direct interfaces with CLASS and can use file input from CAMB; it offers multiple output modules for RAMSES (ascl:1011.007), Arepo (ascl:1909.010), Gadget-2/3 (ascl:0003.001), and HACC via plugins, and new modules/plugins can be easily added.

[ascl:2205.011] myRadex: Radex with a twist

myRadex solves essentially the same problem as RADEX (ascl:1010.075), except that it takes a different approach to solve the statistical equilibrium problem. Given an initial distribution, myRadex evolves the system towards equilibrium using an ODE solver. Frequencies in the input file are used by default, and a function for calculating critical densities of all the transitions of a molecule is included.

[ascl:2206.006] MYRaf: Aperture photometry GUI for IRAF

MYRaf is a practicable astronomical image reduction and photometry software and interface for IRAF (ascl:9911.002). The library uses IRAF, PyRAF (ascl:1207.011), Ginga (ascl:1303.020), and other python packages with a Qt framework for automated software processing of data from robotic telescopes.

[ascl:1203.009] MYRIAD: N-body code for simulations of star clusters

MYRIAD is a C++ code for collisional N-body simulations of star clusters. The code uses the Hermite fourth-order scheme with block time steps, for advancing the particles in time, while the forces and neighboring particles are computed using the GRAPE-6 board. Special treatment is used for close encounters, binary and multiple sub-systems that either form dynamically or exist in the initial configuration. The structure of the code is modular and allows the appropriate treatment of more physical phenomena, such as stellar and binary evolution, stellar collisions and evolution of close black-hole binaries. Moreover, it can be easily modified so that the part of the code that uses GRAPE-6 could be replaced by another module that uses other accelerating-hardware like the Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). Appropriate choice of the free parameters give a good accuracy and speed for simulations of star clusters up to and beyond core collapse. The code accuracy becomes comparable and even better than the accuracy of existing codes when a number of close binary systems is dynamically created in a simulation; this is due to the high accuracy of the method that is used for close binary and multiple sub-systems. The code can be used for evolving star clusters containing equal-mass stars or star clusters with an initial mass function (IMF) containing an intermediate mass black hole (IMBH) at the center and/or a fraction of primordial binaries, which are systems of particular astrophysical interest.

[ascl:1502.003] N-GenIC: Cosmological structure initial conditions

N-GenIC is an initial conditions code for cosmological structure formation that can be used to set-up random N-body realizations of Gaussian random fields with a prescribed power spectrum in a homogeneously sampled periodic box. The code creates cosmological initial conditions based on the Zeldovich approximation, in a format directly compatible with GADGET (ascl:0003.001) or AREPO (ascl:1909.010).

[ascl:1102.001] N-MODY: A Code for Collisionless N-body Simulations in Modified Newtonian Dynamics

N-MODY is a parallel particle-mesh code for collisionless N-body simulations in modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND). N-MODY is based on a numerical potential solver in spherical coordinates that solves the non-linear MOND field equation, and is ideally suited to simulate isolated stellar systems. N-MODY can be used also to compute the MOND potential of arbitrary static density distributions. A few applications of N-MODY indicate that some astrophysically relevant dynamical processes are profoundly different in MOND and in Newtonian gravity with dark matter.

[ascl:1411.014] NAFE: Noise Adaptive Fuzzy Equalization

NAFE (Noise Adaptive Fuzzy Equalization) is an image processing method allowing for visualization of fine structures in SDO AIA high dynamic range images. It produces artifact-free images and gives significantly better results than methods based on convolution or Fourier transform.

[ascl:1409.009] Nahoon: Time-dependent gas-phase chemical model

Nahoon is a gas-phase chemical model that computes the chemical evolution in a 1D temperature and density structure. It uses chemical networks downloaded from the KInetic Database for Astrochemistry (KIDA) but the model can be adapted to any network. The program is written in Fortran 90 and uses the DLSODES (double precision) solver from the ODEPACK package (ascl:1905.021) to solve the coupled stiff differential equations. The solver computes the chemical evolution of gas-phase species at a fixed temperature and density and can be used in one dimension (1D) if a grid of temperature, density, and visual extinction is provided. Grains, both neutral and negatively charged, and electrons are considered as chemical species and their concentrations are computed at the same time as those of the other species. Nahoon contains a test to check the temperature range of the validity of the rate coefficients and avoid extrapolations outside this range. A test is also included to check for duplication of chemical reactions, defined over complementary ranges of temperature.

[ascl:2303.004] naif: Frequency analysis package

naif extracts frequencies and respective amplitudes from time-series, such as that of an orbital coordinate. Based on the Numerical Analysis of Fundamental Frequencies (NAFF) algorithm and written in Python, naif offers some improvements, particularly in computation time. It also offers functions to plot the power-spectrum before extraction of each frequency, which can be useful for debugging particular orbits.

[ascl:1708.022] Naima: Derivation of non-thermal particle distributions through MCMC spectral fitting

Naima computes non-thermal radiation from relativistic particle populations. It includes tools to perform MCMC fitting of radiative models to X-ray, GeV, and TeV spectra using emcee (ascl:1303.002), an affine-invariant ensemble sampler for Markov Chain Monte Carlo. Naima is an Astropy (ascl:1304.002) affiliated package.

[ascl:2307.048] NaMaster: Unified pseudo-Cl framework

NaMaster computes full-sky angular cross-power spectra of masked, spin-0 and spin-2 fields with an arbitrary number of known contaminants using a pseudo-Cl (aka MASTER) approach. The code also implements E/B-mode purification and offers both full-sky and flat-sky modes. NaMaster is available as a C library, Python module, and standalone program.

[ascl:1803.004] nanopipe: Calibration and data reduction pipeline for pulsar timing

nanopipe is a data reduction pipeline for calibration, RFI removal, and pulse time-of-arrival measurement from radio pulsar data. It was developed primarily for use by the NANOGrav project. nanopipe is written in Python, and depends on the PSRCHIVE (ascl:1105.014) library.

[ascl:1905.020] NAPLES: Numerical Analysis of PLanetary EncounterS

NAPLES (Numerical Analysis of PLanetary EncounterS) performs batch propagations of close encounters in the three-body problem and computes the numerical error with respect to reference trajectories computed in quadruple precision. It uses the LSODAR integrator from ODEPACK (ascl:1905.021) and the equations of motion correspond to several regularized formulations.

[ascl:2110.013] Nauyaca: N-body approach for determining planetary masses and orbital elements

Nauyaca infers planetary masses and orbits from mid-transit times fitting. The code requires transit ephemeris per planet and stellar mass and radius, and uses minimization routines and a Markov chain Monte Carlo method to find planet parameters that best reproduce the transit times based on numerical simulations. The code package provides customized plotting tools for analyzing the results.

[ascl:2307.045] NAVanalysis: Normalized Additional Velocity analysis

NAVanalysis studies the non-baryonic, or non-Newtonian, contribution to galaxy rotation curves straight from a given data sample. Conclusions on the radial profile of a given model can be drawn without individual galaxy fits to provide an efficient sample comparison. The method can be used to eliminate model parameter regions, find the most probable parameter regions, and uncover trends not easy to find from standard fits. Further, NAVanalysis can compare different approaches and models.

[ascl:1102.006] NBODY Codes: Numerical Simulations of Many-body (N-body) Gravitational Interactions

I review the development of direct N-body codes at Cambridge over nearly 40 years, highlighting the main stepping stones. The first code (NBODY1) was based on the simple concepts of a force polynomial combined with individual time steps, where numerical problems due to close encounters were avoided by a softened potential. Fortuitously, the elegant Kustaanheimo-Stiefel two-body regularization soon permitted small star clusters to be studied (NBODY3). Subsequent extensions to unperturbed three-body and four-body regularization proved beneficial in dealing with multiple interactions. Investigations of larger systems became possible with the Ahmad-Cohen neighbor scheme which was used more than 20 years ago for expanding universe models of 4000 galaxies (NBODY2). Combining the neighbor scheme with the regularization procedures enabled more realistic star clusters to be considered (NBODY5). After a period of simulations with no apparent technical progress, chain regularization replaced the treatment of compact subsystems (NBODY3, NBODY5). More recently, the Hermite integration method provided a major advance and has been implemented on the special-purpose HARP computers (NBODY4) together with an alternative version for workstations and supercomputers (NBODY6). These codes also include a variety of algorithms for stellar evolution based on fast lookup functions. The treatment of primordial binaries contains efficient procedures for chaotic two-body motion as well as tidal circularization, and special attention is paid to hierarchical systems and their stability. This family of N-body codes constitutes a powerful tool for dynamical simulations which is freely available to the astronomical community, and the massive effort owes much to collaborators.

[ascl:1502.010] nbody6tt: Tidal tensors in N-body simulations

nbody6tt, based on Aarseth's nbody6 (ascl:1102.006) code, includes the treatment of complex galactic tides in a direct N-body simulation of a star cluster through the use of tidal tensors (tt) and offers two complementary methods. The first allows consideration of any kind of galaxy and orbit, thus offering versatility; this method cannot be used to study tidal debris, as it relies on the tidal approximation (linearization of the tidal force). The second method is not limited by this and does not require a galaxy simulation; the user defines a numerical function which takes position and time as arguments, and the galactic potential is returned. The space and time derivatives of the potential are used to (i) integrate the motion of the cluster on its orbit in the galaxy (starting from user-defined initial position and velocity vector), and (ii) compute the tidal acceleration on the stars.

[ascl:1904.027] nbodykit: Massively parallel, large-scale structure toolkit

nbodykit provides algorithms for analyzing cosmological datasets from N-body simulations and large-scale structure surveys, and takes advantage of the abundance and availability of large-scale computing resources. The package provides a unified treatment of simulation and observational datasets by insulating algorithms from data containers, and reduces wall-clock time by scaling to thousands of cores. All algorithms are parallel and run with Message Passing Interface (MPI); the code is designed to be deployed on large super-computing facilities. nbodykit offers an interactive user interface that performs as well in a Jupyter notebook as on super-computing machines.

[ascl:1010.019] NBSymple: A Double Parallel, Symplectic N-body Code Running on Graphic Processing Units

NBSymple is a numerical code which numerically integrates the equation of motions of N 'particles' interacting via Newtonian gravitation and move in an external galactic smooth field. The force evaluation on every particle is done by mean of direct summation of the contribution of all the other system's particle, avoiding truncation error. The time integration is done with second-order and sixth-order symplectic schemes. NBSymple has been parallelized twice, by mean of the Computer Unified Device Architecture to make the all-pair force evaluation as fast as possible on high-performance Graphic Processing Units NVIDIA TESLA C 1060, while the O(N) computations are distributed on various CPUs by mean of OpenMP Application Program. The code works both in single precision floating point arithmetics or in double precision. The use of single precision allows the use at best of the GPU performances but, of course, limits the precision of simulation in some critical situations. We find a good compromise in using a software reconstruction of double precision for those variables that are most critical for the overall precision of the code.

[ascl:2303.008] nd-redshift: Number Density Redshift Evolution Code

Comparing galaxies across redshifts via cumulative number densities is a popular way to estimate the evolution of specific galaxy populations. nd-redshift uses abundance matching in the ΛCDM paradigm to estimate the median change in number density with redshift. It also provides estimates for the 1σ range of number densities corresponding to galaxy progenitors and descendants.

[ascl:1411.023] NDF: Extensible N-dimensional Data Format Library

The Extensible N-Dimensional Data Format (NDF) stores bulk data in the form of N-dimensional arrays of numbers. It is typically used for storing spectra, images and similar datasets with higher dimensionality. The NDF format is based on the Hierarchical Data System (HDS) and is extensible; not only does it provide a comprehensive set of standard ancillary items to describe the data, it can also be extended indefinitely to handle additional user-defined information of any type. The NDF library is used to read and write files in the NDF format. It is distributed with the Starlink software (ascl:1110.012).

[ascl:1101.002] NDSPMHD Smoothed Particle Magnetohydrodynamics Code

This paper presents an overview and introduction to Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics and Magnetohydrodynamics in theory and in practice. Firstly, we give a basic grounding in the fundamentals of SPH, showing how the equations of motion and energy can be self-consistently derived from the density estimate. We then show how to interpret these equations using the basic SPH interpolation formulae and highlight the subtle difference in approach between SPH and other particle methods. In doing so, we also critique several `urban myths' regarding SPH, in particular the idea that one can simply increase the `neighbour number' more slowly than the total number of particles in order to obtain convergence. We also discuss the origin of numerical instabilities such as the pairing and tensile instabilities. Finally, we give practical advice on how to resolve three of the main issues with SPMHD: removing the tensile instability, formulating dissipative terms for MHD shocks and enforcing the divergence constraint on the particles, and we give the current status of developments in this area. Accompanying the paper is the first public release of the NDSPMHD SPH code, a 1, 2 and 3 dimensional code designed as a testbed for SPH/SPMHD algorithms that can be used to test many of the ideas and used to run all of the numerical examples contained in the paper.

[submitted] NE2001p: A Native Python Implementation of the NE2001 Galactic Electron Density Model

NE2001p is a fully Python implementation of the NE2001 Galactic electron density model. NE2001p forward models the dispersion and scattering of compact radio sources, including pulsars, fast radio bursts, AGNs, and masers, and the model predicts the distances of radio sources that lack independent distance measures.

[ascl:1411.013] NEAT: Nebular Empirical Analysis Tool

NEAT is a fully automated code which carries out a complete analysis of lists of emission lines to estimate the amount of interstellar extinction, calculate representative temperatures and densities, compute ionic abundances from both collisionally excited lines and recombination lines, and finally to estimate total elemental abundances using an ionization correction scheme. NEAT uses a Monte Carlo technique to robustly propagate uncertainties from line flux measurements through to the derived abundances.

[ascl:1809.009] NEBULA: Radiative transfer code of ionized nebulae at radio wavelengths

NEBULA performs the radiative transfer of the 3He+ hyperfine transition, radio recombination lines (RRLs), and free-free continuum emission through a model nebula. The model nebula is composed of only H and He within a three-dimension Cartesian grid with arbitrary density, temperature, and ionization structure. The 3He+ line is assumed to be in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), but non-LTE effects and pressure broadening from electron impacts can be included for the RRLs. All spectra are broadened by thermal and microturbulent motions.

[ascl:1608.019] NEBULAR: Spectrum synthesis for mixed hydrogen-helium gas in ionization equilibrium

NEBULAR synthesizes the spectrum of a mixed hydrogen helium gas in collisional ionization equilibrium. It is not a spectral fitting code, but it can be used to resample a model spectrum onto the wavelength grid of a real observation. It supports a wide range of temperatures and densities. NEBULAR includes free-free, free-bound, two-photon and line emission from HI, HeI and HeII. The code will either return the composite model spectrum, or, if desired, the unrescaled atomic emission coefficients. It is written in C++ and depends on the GNU Scientific Library (GSL).

[ascl:1010.004] Needatool: A Needlet Analysis Tool for Cosmological Data Processing

NeedATool (Needlet Analysis Tool) performs data analysis based on needlets, a wavelet rendition powerful for the analysis of fields defined on a sphere. Needlets have been applied successfully to the treatment of astrophysical and cosmological observations, particularly to the analysis of cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. Wavelets have emerged as a useful tool for CMB data analysis, as they combine most of the advantages of both pixel space, where it is easier to deal with partial sky coverage and experimental noise, and the harmonic domain, in which beam treatment and comparison with theoretical predictions are more effective due in large part to their sharp localization.

[ascl:2210.009] NEMESIS: Non-linear optimal estimator for multivariate spectral analysis

NEMESIS (Non-linear optimal Estimator for MultivariatE spectral analySIS) is the general purpose correlated-k/LBL retrieval code developed from the RADTRAN project (ascl:2210.008). Originally based on the correlated-k approximation, NEMESIS also works in line-by-line (LBL) mode. It has been designed to be generally applicable to any planet and with any observing mode and so is suitable for both solar-system studies and also exoplanetary studies.

[ascl:2311.015] nemiss: Neutrino emission from hydrocode data

nemiss calculates neutrino emission from an astrophysical jet. nemiss works as part of the PLUTO-nemiss-rlos pipeline. PLUTO (ascl:1010.045) produces a hydrodynamical jet. Then, nemiss calculates beamed neutrino emission at each eligible cell along a given direction in space. Finally, rlos (ascl:1811.009) produces a synthetic neutrino image of the jet along the given direction, taking into consideration the finite nature of the speed of light.

[ascl:1010.051] NEMO: A Stellar Dynamics Toolbox

NEMO is an extendible Stellar Dynamics Toolbox, following an Open-Source Software model. It has various programs to create, integrate, analyze and visualize N-body and SPH like systems, following the pipe and filter architecture. In addition there are various tools to operate on images, tables and orbits, including FITS files to export/import to/from other astronomical data reduction packages. A large growing fraction of NEMO has been contributed by a growing list of authors. The source code consist of a little over 4000 files and a little under 1,000,000 lines of code and documentation, mostly C, and some C++ and Fortran. NEMO development started in 1986 in Princeton (USA) by Barnes, Hut and Teuben. See also ZENO (ascl:1102.027) for the version that Barnes maintains.

[ascl:2308.006] Nemo: Millimeter-wave map filtering and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich galaxy cluster and source detection

Nemo detects millimeter-wave Sunyaev-Zel'dovich galaxy clusters and compact sources. Originally developed for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope project, the code is capable of analyzing the next generation of deep, wide multifrequency millimeter-wave maps that will be produced by experiments such as the Simons Observatory. Nemo provides several modules for analyzing ACT/SO data in addition to the command-line programs provided in the package.

[ascl:2311.005] NEOexchange: Target and Observation Manager for the Solar System

The NEOexchange web portal and Target and Observation Manager ingests solar system objects, including Near-Earth Object (NEO) candidates from the Minor Planet Center, schedules observations on the Las Cumbres Observatory global telescope network and reduces, displays, and analyzes the resulting data. NEOexchange produces calibrated photometry from the imaging data and uses Source Extractor (ascl:1010.064) and SCAMP (ascl:1010.063) to perform object detection and astrometric fitting and calviacat (ascl:2207.015) to perform photometric calibration against photometric catalogs. It also has the ability to perform image registration and subtraction using SWARP (ascl:1010.068) and HOTPANTS (ascl:1504.004) and image stacking, alignment, and faint feature detection using gnuastro (ascl:1801.009).

[ascl:1307.017] NEST: Noble Element Simulation Technique

NEST (Noble Element Simulation Technique) offers comprehensive, accurate, and precise simulation of the excitation, ionization, and corresponding scintillation and electroluminescence processes in liquid noble elements, useful for direct dark matter detectors, double beta decay searches, PET scans, and general radiation detection technology. Written in C++, NEST is an add-on module for the Geant4 simulation package that incorporates more detailed physics than is currently available into the simulation of scintillation. NEST is of particular use for low-energy nuclear recoils. All available liquid xenon data on nuclear recoils and electron recoils to date have been taken into consideration in arriving at the current models. NEST also handles the magnitude of the light and charge yields of nuclear recoils, including their electric field dependence, thereby shedding light on the possibility of detection or exclusion of a low-mass dark matter WIMP by liquid xenon detectors.

[ascl:1809.012] nestcheck: Nested sampling calculations analysis

Nestcheck analyzes nested sampling runs and estimates numerical uncertainties on calculations using them. The package can load results from a number of nested sampling software packages, including MultiNest (ascl:1109.006), PolyChord (ascl:1502.011), dynesty (ascl:1809.013) and perfectns (ascl:1809.005), and offers the flexibility to add input functions for other nested sampling software packages. Nestcheck utilities include error analysis, diagnostic tests, and plots for nested sampling calculations.

[ascl:2103.022] nestle: Nested sampling algorithms for evaluating Bayesian evidence

nestle is a pure Python implementation of nested sampling algorithms for evaluating Bayesian evidence. Nested sampling integrates posterior probability in order to compare models in Bayesian statistics. It is similar to Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) in that it generates samples that can be used to estimate the posterior probability distribution. Unlike MCMC, the nature of the sampling also allows one to calculate the integral of the distribution. It is also a pretty good method for robustly finding global maxima.

[submitted] Network Flux Transport Demonstration

We have developed a method to efficiently simulate the dynamics of the magnetic flux in the solar network. We call this method Network Flux Transport (NFT). Implemented using a Spherical Centroidal Voronoi Tessellation (SCVT) based network model, magnetic flux is advected by photospheric plasma velocity fields according to the geometry of the SCVT model. We test NFT by simulating the magnetism of the Solar poles. The poles of the sun above 55 deg latitude are free from flux emergence from active regions or ephemeral regions. As such, they are ideal targets for a simplified simulation that relies on the strengths of the NFT model. This simulation method reproduces the magnetic and spatial distributions for the solar poles over two full solar cycles.

[ascl:1010.085] Network Tools for Astronomical Data Retrieval

The first step in a science project is the acquisition and understanding of the relevant data. The tools range from simple data transfer methods to more complex browser-emulating scripts. When integrated with a defined sample or catalog, these scripts provide seamless techniques to retrieve and store data of varying types. These tools can be used to leapfrog from website to website to acquire multi-wavelength datasets. This project demonstrates the capability to use multiple data websites, in conjunction, to perform the type of calculations once reserved for on-site datasets.

[ascl:2112.007] NeutrinoFog: Neutrino fog and floor for direct dark matter searches

NeutrinoFog calculates the neutrino floor based on the derivative of a hypothetical experimental discovery limit as a function of exposure, and leads to a neutrino floor that is only influenced by the systematic uncertainties on the neutrino flux normalizations.

[ascl:2305.024] Nextflow: DSL for data-driven computational pipelines

Nextflow enables scalable and reproducible scientific workflows using software containers. It allows the adaptation of pipelines written in the most common scripting languages. Its fluent DSL simplifies the implementation and the deployment of complex parallel and reactive workflows on clouds and clusters. Nextflow supports deploying workflows on a variety of execution platforms including local, HPC schedulers, AWS Batch, Google Cloud Life Sciences, and Kubernetes. Additionally, it provides support for workflow dependencies through built-in support for, for example, Conda, Spack, Docker, Podman, Singularity, and Modules.

[ascl:1807.011] nfield: Stochastic tool for QFT on inflationary backgrounds

nfield uses a stochastic formalism to compute the IR correlation functions of quantum fields during cosmic inflation in n-field dimensions. This is a necessary 1-loop resummation of the correlation functions to render them finite. The code supports the implementation of n-numbers of coupled test fields (energetically sub-dominant) as well as non-test fields.

[submitted] nFITSview: A simple and user-friendly FITS image viewer

nFITSview is a simple, user-friendly and open-source FITS image viewer available for Linux and Windows. One of the main concepts of nFITSview is to provide an intuitive user interface which may be helpful both for scientists and for amateur astronomers. nFITSview has different color mapping and manipulation schemes, supports different formats of FITS data files as well as exporting them to different popular image formats. It also supports command-line exporting (with some restrictions) of FITS files to other image formats.
The application is written in C++/Qt for achieving better performance, and with every next version the performance aspect is taken into account.
nFITSview uses its own libnfits library (can be used separately as well) for parsing the FITS files.

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