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[ascl:1201.009] ExoFit: Orbital parameters of extra-solar planets from radial velocity

ExoFit is a freely available software package for estimating orbital parameters of extra-solar planets. ExoFit can search for either one or two planets and employs a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method to fit a Keplerian radial velocity curve onto the radial velocity data.

[ascl:1812.007] ExoGAN: Exoplanets Generative Adversarial Network

ExoGAN (Exoplanets Generative Adversarial Network) analyzes exoplanetary atmospheres using an unsupervised deep-learning algorithm that recognizes molecular features, atmospheric trace-gas abundances, and planetary parameters. After training, ExoGAN can be applied to a large number of instruments and planetary types and can be used either as a final atmospheric analysis or to provide prior constraints to subsequent retrieval.

[ascl:1806.020] exoinformatics: Compute the entropy of a planetary system's size-ordering

exoinformatics computes the entropy of a planetary system's size ordering using three different entropy methods: tally-scores, integral path, and change points.

[ascl:2206.003] ExoJAX: Spectrum modeling of exoplanets and brown dwarfs

ExoJAX provides auto-differentiable line-by-line spectral modeling of exoplanets/brown dwarfs/M dwarfs using JAX (ascl:2111.002). In a nutshell, ExoJAX allows the user to do a HMC-NUTS fitting using the latest molecular/atomic data in ExoMol, HITRAN/HITEMP, and VALD3. The code enables a fully Bayesian inference of the high-dispersion data to fit the line-by-line spectral computation to the observed spectrum, from end-to-end (i.e. from molecular/atomic databases to real spectra), by combining it with the Hamiltonian Monte Carlo in recent probabilistic programming languages such as NumPyro.

[submitted] ExoPix: Exoplanet Imaging with JWST

ExoPix is a collection of tutorials aimed at illustrating the imaging of exoplanets with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). ExoPix tutorials are meant to demonstrate the application of the PSF-subtraction algorithm pyKLIP (ascl:1506.001) to simulated JWST NIRCAM data. We provide simple walkthroughs of pyKLIP’s ability to reveal exoplanets, compute contrast curves, and measure exoplanet astrometry and photometry in imaged extrasolar systems.

[submitted] ExoPlanet

ExoPlanet provides a graphical interface for the construction, evaluation and application of a machine learning model in predictive analysis. With the back-end built using the numpy and scikit-learn libraries, ExoPlanet couples fast and well tested algorithms, a UI designed over the PyQt framework, and graphs rendered using Matplotlib. This serves to provide the user with a rich interface, rapid analytics and interactive visuals.

ExoPlanet is designed to have a minimal learning curve to allow researchers to focus more on the applicative aspect of machine learning algorithms rather than their implementation details and supports both methods of learning, providing algorithms for unsupervised and supervised training, which may be done with continuous or discrete labels. The parameters of each algorithms can be adjusted to ensure the best fit for the data. Training data is read from a CSV file, and after training is complete, ExoPlanet automates the building of the visual representations for the trained model. Once training and evaluation yield satisfactory results, the model may be used to make data based predictions on a new data set.

[ascl:1910.005] exoplanet: Probabilistic modeling of transit or radial velocity observations of exoplanets

exoplanet is a toolkit for probabilistic modeling of transit and/or radial velocity observations of exoplanets and other astronomical time series using PyMC3 (ascl:1610.016), a flexible and high-performance model building language and inference engine. exoplanet extends PyMC3's language to support many of the custom functions and distributions required when fitting exoplanet datasets. These features include a fast and robust solver for Kepler's equation; scalable Gaussian processes using celerite (ascl:1709.008); and fast and accurate limb darkened light curves using the code starry (ascl:1810.005). It also offers common reparameterizations for limb darkening parameters, and planet radius and impact parameters.

[ascl:1501.015] Exoplanet: Trans-dimensional MCMC method for exoplanet discovery

Exoplanet determines the posterior distribution of exoplanets by use of a trans-dimensional Markov Chain Monte Carlo method within Nested Sampling. This method finds the posterior distribution in a single run rather than requiring multiple runs with trial values.

[ascl:2108.021] ExoPlaSim: Exoplanet climate simulator

ExoPlaSim extends the PlaSim (ascl:2107.019) 3D general climate model to terrestrial exoplanets. It includes the PlaSim general circulation model and modifications that allow this code to run tidally-locked planets, planets with substantially different surface pressures than Earth, planets orbiting stars with different effective temperatures, super-Earths, and more. ExoPlaSim includes the ability to compute carbon-silicate weathering, dynamic orography through the glacier module (though only accumulation and ablation/evaporation/melting are included; glacial flow and spreading are not), and storm climatology.

[ascl:2404.029] ExoPlex: Thermodynamically self-consistent mass-radius-composition calculator

ExoPlex is a thermodynamically self-consistent mass-radius-composition calculator. Users input a bulk molar composition and a mass or radius, and ExoPlex will calculate the resulting radius or mass. Additionally, it will produce the planet's core mass fraction, interior mineralogy and the pressure, adiabatic temperature, gravity and density profiles as a function of depth.

[ascl:1407.008] Exopop: Exoplanet population inference

Exopop is a general hierarchical probabilistic framework for making justified inferences about the population of exoplanets. Written in python, it requires that the occurrence rate density be a smooth function of period and radius (employing a Gaussian process) and takes survey completeness and observational uncertainties into account. Exopop produces more accurate estimates of the whole population than standard procedures based on weighting by inverse detection efficiency.

[ascl:1603.010] ExoPriors: Accounting for observational bias of transiting exoplanets

ExoPriors calculates a log-likelihood penalty for an input set of transit parameters to account for observational bias (geometric and signal-to-noise ratio detection bias) of transiting exoplanets. Written in Python, the code calculates this log-likelihood penalty in one of seven user-specified cases specified with Boolean input parameters for geometric and/or SNR bias, grazing or non-grazing events, and occultation events.

[ascl:2210.006] ExoRad2: Generic point source radiometric model

ExoRad 2.0, a generic point source radiometric model, interfaces with any instrument to provide an estimate of several Payload performance metrics. For each target and for each photometric and spectroscopic channel, the code provides estimates of signals in pixels, saturation times, and read, photon, and dark current noise. ExoRad also provides estimates for the zodiacal background, inner sanctum, and sky foreground.

[ascl:1501.012] Exorings: Exoring modelling software

Exorings, written in Python, contains tools for displaying and fitting giant extrasolar planet ring systems; it uses FITS formatted data for input.

[ascl:1703.008] exorings: Exoring Transit Properties

Exorings is suitable for surveying entire catalogs of transiting planet candidates for exoring candidates, providing a subset of objects worthy of more detailed light curve analysis. Moreover, it is highly suited for uncovering evidence of a population of ringed planets by comparing the radius anomaly and PR-effects in ensemble studies.

[ascl:2002.019] ExoRT: Two-stream radiative transfer code

ExoRT is a flexible, two-stream radiative transfer code that interfaces with CAM/CESM (http://www.cesm.ucar.edu/models/current.html) or 1D offline; it is also used with ExoCAM (ascl:2002.020). Quadrature is used for shortwave and hemispheric mean is used for longwave. The gas phase optical depths are calculate using a correlated K-distribution method, with overlapping bands treated using an amount weighted scheme. Cloud optics are treated using mie scattering for both liquid and ice clouds, and cloud overlap is treated using Monte Carlo Independent Column Approximation.

[ascl:2002.008] ExoSim: Simulator for predicting signal and noise in transit spectroscopy observations

ExoSim models host star and planet transit events, simulating the temporal change in stellar flux due to the light curve. It is wavelength-dependent, using an input planet spectrum to determine the light curve depth for any given wavelength and can capture temporal effects, such as correlated noise. ExoSim's star spot simulator produces simulated observations that include spot and facula contamination. The code is flexible and can be generically applied to different instruments that simulate specific time-dependent processes.

[ascl:1706.010] EXOSIMS: Exoplanet Open-Source Imaging Mission Simulator

EXOSIMS generates and analyzes end-to-end simulations of space-based exoplanet imaging missions. The software is built up of interconnecting modules describing different aspects of the mission, including the observatory, optical system, and scheduler (encoding mission rules) as well as the physical universe, including the assumed distribution of exoplanets and their physical and orbital properties. Each module has a prototype implementation that is inherited by specific implementations for different missions concepts, allowing for the simulation of widely variable missions.

[ascl:1708.023] ExoSOFT: Exoplanet Simple Orbit Fitting Toolbox

ExoSOFT provides orbital analysis of exoplanets and binary star systems. It fits any combination of astrometric and radial velocity data, and offers four parameter space exploration techniques, including MCMC. It is packaged with an automated set of post-processing and plotting routines to summarize results, and is suitable for performing orbital analysis during surveys with new radial velocity and direct imaging instruments.

[ascl:2001.011] ExoTETHyS: Exoplanetary transits and eclipsing binaries modeler

ExoTETHyS models exoplanetary transits, eclipsing binaries, and related phenomena. The package calculates stellar limb-darkening coefficients down to <10 parts per million (ppm) and generates an exact transit light-curve based on the entire stellar intensity profile rather than limb-darkening coefficients.

[ascl:2302.009] EXOTIC: EXOplanet Transit Interpretation Code

EXOTIC (EXOplanet Transit Interpretation Code) analyzes photometric data of transiting exoplanets into lightcurves and retrieves transit epochs and planetary radii. The software reduces images of a transiting exoplanet into a lightcurve, and fits a model to the data to extract planetary information crucial to increasing the efficiency of larger observational platforms. EXOTIC is written in Python and supports the citizen science project Exoplanet Watch. The software runs on Windows, Macintosh, and Linux/Unix computer, and can also be used via Google Colab.

[ascl:1706.001] Exotrending: Fast and easy-to-use light curve detrending software for exoplanets

The simple, straightforward Exotrending code detrends exoplanet transit light curves given a light curve (flux versus time) and good ephemeris (epoch of first transit and orbital period). The code has been tested with Kepler and K2 light curves and should work with any other light curve.

[ascl:2203.002] exoVista: Planetary systems generator

exoVista generates a "universe" of planetary systems, creating thousands of models of quasi-self-consistent planetary systems around known nearby stars at scattered light wavelengths. It efficiently records the position, velocity, spectrum, and physical parameters of all bodies as functions of time. exoVista models can be used for simulating surveys using the direct imaging, transit, astrometric, and radial velocity techniques.

[ascl:1902.009] ExPRES: Exoplanetary and Planetary Radio Emissions Simulator

ExPRES (Exoplanetary and Planetary Radio Emission Simulator) reproduces the occurrence of CMI-generated radio emissions from planetary magnetospheres, exoplanets or star-planet interacting systems in time-frequency plane, with special attention given to computation of the radio emission beaming at and near its source. Physical information drawn from such radio observations may include the location and dynamics of the radio sources, the type of current system leading to electron acceleration and their energy and, for exoplanetary systems, the magnetic field strength, the orbital period of the emitting body and the rotation period, tilt and offset of the planetary magnetic field. Most of these parameters can be remotely measured only via radio observations. ExPRES code provides the proper framework of analysis and interpretation for past (Cassini, Voyager, Galileo), current (Juno, ground-based radio telescopes) and future (BepiColombo, Juice) observations of planetary radio emissions, as well as for future detection of radio emissions from exoplanetary systems.

[ascl:1212.013] EXSdetect: Extended X-ray Source Detection

EXSdetect is a python implementation of an X-ray source detection algorithm which is optimally designed to detected faint extended sources and makes use of Voronoi tessellation and Friend-of-Friend technique. It is a flexible tool capable of detecting extended sources down to the lowest flux levels attainable within instrumental limitations while maintaining robust photometry, high completeness, and low contamination, regardless of source morphology. EXSdetect was developed mainly to exploit the ever-increasing wealth of archival X-ray data, but is also ideally suited to explore the scientific capabilities of future X-ray facilities, with a strong focus on investigations of distant groups and clusters of galaxies.

[ascl:9906.002] EXTINCT: A computerized model of large-scale visual interstellar extinction

The program EXTINCT.FOR is a FORTRAN subroutine summarizing a three-dimensional visual Galactic extinction model, based on a number of published studies. INPUTS: Galactic latitude (degrees), Galactic longitude (degrees), and source distance (kpc). OUTPUTS (magnitudes): Extinction, extinction error, a statistical correction term, and an array containing extinction and extinction error from each subroutine. The model is useful for correcting visual magnitudes of Galactic sources (particularly in statistical models), and has been used to find Galactic extinction of extragalactic sources. The model's limited angular resolution (subroutine-dependent, but with a minimum resolution of roughly 2 degrees) is necessitated by its ability to describe three-dimensional structure.

[ascl:1708.025] extinction-distances: Estimating distances to dark clouds

Extinction-distances uses the number of foreground stars and a Galactic model of the stellar distribution to estimate the distance to dark clouds. It exploits the relatively narrow range of intrinsic near-infrared colors of stars to separate foreground from background stars. An advantage of this method is that the distribution of stellar colors in the Galactic model need not be precisely correct, only the number density as a function of distance from the Sun.

[ascl:2102.026] extinction: Dust extinction laws

extinction is an implementation of fast interstellar dust extinction laws in Python. It contains Cython-optimized implementations of empirical dust extinction laws found in the literature. Flux values can be reddened or dereddened using included functions, and all extinction laws accept a unit keyword to change the interpretation of the wavelength array from Angstroms to inverse microns. Part of this code originated in the specutils package (ascl:1902.012).

[ascl:1803.011] ExtLaw_H18: Extinction law code

ExtLaw_H18 generates the extinction law between 0.8 - 2.2 microns. The law is derived using the Westerlund 1 (Wd1) main sequence (A_Ks ~ 0.6 mag) and Arches cluster field Red Clump at the Galactic Center (A_Ks ~ 2.7 mag). To derive the law a Wd1 cluster age of 5 Myr is assumed, though changing the cluster age between 4 Myr -- 7 Myr has no effect on the law. This extinction law can be applied to highly reddened stellar populations that have similar foreground material as Wd1 and the Arches RC, namely dust from the spiral arms of the Milky Way in the Galactic Plane.

[ascl:2305.003] extrapops: Fast simulation and analysis of extra-galactic binary GW sources

extrapops simulates extra-galactic populations of gravitational waves sources and models their emission during the inspiral phase. The code approximately assesses the detectability of individual sources by LISA and computes the background due to unresolved sources in the LISA band using different methods. The simulated populations can be saved in a format compatible with LISA LDC. Simulations are well calibrated to produce accurate background calculations and fair random generation at the tails of the distributions, which is important for accurate probability of detectable events. extrapops uses a number of ad-hoc techniques for rapid simulation and allows room for further optimization up to almost 1 order of magnitude.

[ascl:1010.032] Extreme Deconvolution: Density Estimation using Gaussian Mixtures in the Presence of Noisy, Heterogeneous and Incomplete Data

Extreme-deconvolution is a general algorithm to infer a d-dimensional distribution function from a set of heterogeneous, noisy observations or samples. It is fast, flexible, and treats the data's individual uncertainties properly, to get the best description possible for the underlying distribution. It performs well over the full range of density estimation, from small data sets with only tens of samples per dimension, to large data sets with hundreds of thousands of data points.

[ascl:1010.061] EyE: Enhance Your Extraction

In EyE (Enhance Your Extraction) an artificial neural network connected to pixels of a moving window (retina) is trained to associate these input stimuli to the corresponding response in one or several output image(s). The resulting filter can be loaded in SExtractor (ascl:1010.064) to operate complex, wildly non-linear filters on astronomical images. Typical applications of EyE include adaptive filtering, feature detection and cosmetic corrections.

[ascl:1407.019] EZ_Ages: Stellar population age calculator

EZ_Ages is an IDL code package that computes the mean, light-weighted stellar population age, [Fe/H], and abundance enhancements [Mg/Fe], [C/Fe], [N/Fe], and [Ca/Fe] for unresolved stellar populations. This is accomplished by comparing Lick index line strengths between the data and the stellar population models of Schiavon (2007), using a method described in Graves & Schiavon (2008). The algorithm uses the inversion of index-index model grids to determine ages and abundances, and exploits the sensitivities of the various Lick indices to measure Mg, C, N, and Ca enhancements over their solar abundances with respect to Fe.

[ascl:1210.004] EZ: A Tool For Automatic Redshift Measurement

EZ (Easy-Z) estimates redshifts for extragalactic objects. It compares the observed spectrum with a set of (user given) spectral templates to find out the best value for the redshift. To accomplish this task, it uses a highly configurable set of algorithms. EZ is easily extendible with new algorithms. It is implemented as a set of C programs and a number of python classes. It can be used as a standalone program, or the python classes can be directly imported by other applications.

[ascl:1208.021] EzGal: A Flexible Interface for Stellar Population Synthesis Models

EzGal is a flexible Python program which generates observable parameters (magnitudes, colors, and mass-to-light ratios) for arbitrary input stellar population synthesis (SPS) models; it enables simple, direct comparison of different model sets so that the uncertainty introduced by choice of model set can be quantified. EzGal is also capable of generating composite stellar population models (CSPs) for arbitrary input star-formation histories and reddening laws, and can be used to interpolate between metallicities for a given model set.

[ascl:2201.001] EzTao: Easier CARMA Modeling

EzTao models time series as a continuous-time autoregressive moving-average (CARMA) process. EzTao utilizes celerite (ascl:1709.008), a fast and scalable Gaussian Process Regression library, to evaluate the likelihood function. On average, EzTao is ten times faster than other tools relying on a Kalman filter for likelihood computation.

[ascl:1705.006] f3: Full Frame Fotometry for Kepler Full Frame Images

Light curves from the Kepler telescope rely on "postage stamp" cutouts of a few pixels near each of 200,000 target stars. These light curves are optimized for the detection of short-term signals like planet transits but induce systematics that overwhelm long-term variations in stellar flux. Longer-term effects can be recovered through analysis of the Full Frame Images, a set of calibration data obtained monthly during the Kepler mission. The Python package f3 analyzes the Full Frame Images to infer long-term astrophysical variations in the brightness of Kepler targets, such as magnetic activity or sunspots on slowly rotating stars.

[ascl:2307.062] FABADA: Non-parametric noise reduction using Bayesian inference

FABADA (Fully Adaptive Bayesian Algorithm for Data Analysis) performs non-parametric noise reduction using Bayesian inference. It iteratively evaluates possible smoothed models of the data to estimate the underlying signal that is statistically compatible with the noisy measurements. Iterations stop based on the evidence E and the χ2 statistic of the last smooth model, and the expected value of the signal is computed as a weighted average of the smooth models. Though FABADA was written for astronomical data, such as spectra (1D) or images (2D), it can be used as a general noise reduction algorithm for any one- or two-dimensional data; the only requisite of the input data is an estimation of its associated variance.

[ascl:1802.001] FAC: Flexible Atomic Code

FAC calculates various atomic radiative and collisional processes, including radiative transition rates, collisional excitation and ionization by electron impact, energy levels, photoionization, and autoionization, and their inverse processes radiative recombination and dielectronic capture. The package also includes a collisional radiative model to construct synthetic spectra for plasmas under different physical conditions.

[ascl:2306.038] FacetClumps: Molecular clump detection algorithm based on Facet model

FacetClumps extracts and analyses clumpy structure in molecular clouds. Written in Python and based on the Gaussian Facet model, FacetClumps extracts signal regions using morphology, and segments the signal regions into local regions with a gradient-based method. It then applies a connectivity-based minimum distance clustering method to cluster the local regions to the clump centers. FacetClumps automatically adjusts its parameters to local situations to improve adaptability, and is optimized to detect faint and overlapping clumps.

[ascl:2210.024] Faiss: Similarity search and clustering of dense vectors library

The Faiss library performs efficient similarity search and clustering of dense vectors. It contains algorithms that search in sets of vectors of any size, up to ones that possibly do not fit in RAM. It also contains supporting code for evaluation and parameter tuning. Faiss is written in C++ with complete wrappers for Python/numpy. Some of the most useful algorithms are implemented on the GPU.

[ascl:2001.005] FAKEOBS: Model visibilities generator

The CASA (1107.013) task FAKEOBS generates model visibilities from already-existing measurement sets. This task can be used to substitute all the visibilities of the target with simulations computed from any model image. The measurement can either be with real or simulated data, the target can have been observed in mosaic mode, and there can be several sources (e.g., bandpass calibrator, flux/phase calibrator, and target).

[ascl:2304.004] FALCO: Fast Linearized Coronagraph Optimizer in MATLAB

FALCO (Fast Linearized Coronagraph Optimizer) performs coronagraphic focal plane wavefront correction. It includes routines for pair-wise probing estimation of the complex electric field and Electric Field Conjugation (EFC) control. FALCO utilizes and builds upon PROPER (ascl:1405.006) and rapidly computes the linearized response matrix for each DM, which facilitates re-linearization after each control step for faster DM-integrated coronagraph design and wavefront correction experiments. A Python 3 implementation of FALCO (ascl:2304.005) is also available.

[ascl:2304.005] FALCO: Fast Linearized Coronagraph Optimizer in Python

FALCO (Fast Linearized Coronagraph Optimizer) performs coronagraphic focal plane wavefront correction. It includes routines for pair-wise probing estimation of the complex electric field and Electric Field Conjugation (EFC) control. FALCO utilizes and builds upon PROPER (ascl:1405.006) and rapidly computes the linearized response matrix for each DM, which facilitates re-linearization after each control step for faster DM-integrated coronagraph design and wavefront correction experiments. A MATLAB implementation of FALCO (ascl:2304.004) is also available.

[ascl:2205.004] FAlCon-DNS: Framework of time schemes for direct numerical simulation of annular convection

FAlCon-DNS (Framework of time schemes for direct numerical simulation of annular convection) solves for 2-D convection in an annulus and analyzes different time integration schemes. The framework contains a suite of IMEX, IMEXRK and RK time integration schemes. The code uses a pseudospectral method for spatial discretization. The governing equations contain both numerically stiff (diffusive) and non-stiff (advective) components for time discretization. The software offers OpenMP for parallelization.

[ascl:1509.004] FalconIC: Initial conditions generator for cosmological N-body simulations in Newtonian, Relativistic and Modified theories

FalconIC generates discrete particle positions, velocities, masses and pressures based on linear Boltzmann solutions that are computed by libraries such as CLASS and CAMB. FalconIC generates these initial conditions for any species included in the selection, including Baryons, Cold Dark Matter and Dark Energy fluids. Any species can be set in Eulerian (on a fixed grid) or Lagrangian (particle motion) representation, depending on the gauge and reality chosen. That is, for relativistic initial conditions in the synchronous comoving gauge, Dark Matter can only be described in an Eulerian representation. For all other choices (Relativistic in Longitudinal gauge, Newtonian with relativistic expansion rates, Newtonian without any notion of radiation), all species can be treated in all representations. The code also computes spectra. FalconIC is useful for comparative studies on initial conditions.

[ascl:1402.016] FAMA: Fast Automatic MOOG Analysis

FAMA (Fast Automatic MOOG Analysis), written in Perl, computes the atmospheric parameters and abundances of a large number of stars using measurements of equivalent widths (EWs) automatically and independently of any subjective approach. Based on the widely-used MOOG code, it simultaneously searches for three equilibria, excitation equilibrium, ionization balance, and the relationship between logn(FeI) and the reduced EWs. FAMA also evaluates the statistical errors on individual element abundances and errors due to the uncertainties in the stellar parameters. Convergence criteria are not fixed "a priori" but instead are based on the quality of the spectra.

[ascl:2006.021] FAMED: Extraction and mode identification of oscillation frequencies for solar-like pulsators

The FAMED (Fast and AutoMated pEak bagging with Diamonds) pipeline is a multi-platform parallelized software that performs and automates extraction and mode identification of oscillation frequencies for solar-like pulsators. The pipeline can be applied to a large variety of stars, ranging from hot F-type main sequence, up to stars evolving along the red giant branch, settled into the core-Helium-burning main sequence, and even evolved beyond towards the early asymptotic giant branch. FAMED is based on DIAMONDS (ascl:1410.001), a Bayesian parameter estimation and model comparison by means of the nested sampling Monte Carlo (NSMC) algorithm.

[ascl:1209.014] FAMIAS: Frequency Analysis and Mode Identification for AsteroSeismology

FAMIAS (Frequency Analysis and Mode Identification for Asteroseismology) is a package of software tools programmed in C++ for the analysis of photometric and spectroscopic time-series data. FAMIAS provides analysis tools that are required for the steps between the data reduction and the seismic modeling. Two main sets of tools are incorporated in FAMIAS. The first set permits to search for periodicities in the data using Fourier and non-linear least-squares fitting techniques. The other set permits to carry out a mode identification for the detected pulsation frequencies to determine their harmonic degree l, and azimuthal order m. FAMIAS is applicable to main-sequence pulsators hotter than the Sun. This includes Gamma Dor, Delta Sct stars, slowly pulsating B (SPB)-stars and Beta Cep stars - basically all stars for which empirical mode identification is required to successfully carry out asteroseismology.

[ascl:1102.017] FARGO: Fast Advection in Rotating Gaseous Objects

FARGO is an efficient and simple modification of the standard transport algorithm used in explicit eulerian fixed polar grid codes, aimed at getting rid of the average azimuthal velocity when applying the Courant condition. This results in a much larger timestep than the usual procedure, and it is particularly well-suited to the description of a Keplerian disk where one is traditionally limited by the very demanding Courant condition on the fast orbital motion at the inner boundary. In this modified algorithm, the timestep is limited by the perturbed velocity and by the shear arising from the differential rotation. The speed-up resulting from the use of the FARGO algorithm is problem dependent. In the example presented in the code paper below, which shows the evolution of a Jupiter sized protoplanet embedded in a minimum mass protoplanetary nebula, the FARGO algorithm is about an order of magnitude faster than a traditional transport scheme, with a much smaller numerical diffusivity.

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