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[ascl:1212.008] SIR: Stokes Inversion based on Response functions

SIR is a general-purpose code capable of dealing with gradients of the physical quantities with height. It admits one and two-component model atmospheres. It allows the recovery of the stratification of the temperature, the magnetic field vector, and the line of sight velocity through the atmosphere, and the micro- and macroturbulence velocities - which are assumed to be constant with depth. It is based on the response functions, which enter a Marquardt nonlinear least-squares algorithm in a natural way. Response functions are calculated at the same time as the full radiative transfer equation for polarized light is integrated, which determines values of many free parameters in a reasonable computation time. SIR demonstrates high stability, accuracy, and uniqueness of results, even when simulated observations present signal-to-noise ratios of the order of the lowest acceptable values in real observations.

[ascl:2307.013] SIRENA: Energy reconstruction of X-ray photons for Athena X-IFU

SIRENA (Software Ifca for Reconstruction of EveNts for Athena X-IFU) reconstructs the energy of incoming X-ray photons after their detection in the X-IFU TES detector. It is integrated in the SIXTE (ascl:1903.002) end-to-end simulations environment where it currently runs over SIXTE simulated data. This is done by means of a tool called tesreconstruction, which is mainly a wrapper to pass a data file to the SIRENA tasks.

[ascl:2105.013] SISPO: Imaging simulator for small solar system body missions

SISPO (Space Imaging Simulator for Proximity Operations) simulates trajectories, light parameters, and camera intrinsic parameters for small solar system body fly-by and terrestrial planet surface missions. The software provides realistic surface rendering and realistic dust- and gas-environment optical models for comets and active asteroids and also simulates common image aberrations such as simple geometric distortions and tangential astigmatism. SISPO uses Blender and its Cycles rendering engine, which provides physically based rendering capabilities and procedural micropolygon displacement texture generation.

[ascl:2203.001] SISTER: Starshade Imaging Simulation Toolkit for Exoplanet Reconnaissance

SISTER (Starshade Imaging Simulations Toolkit for Exoplanet Reconnaissance) predicts how an exoplanet system would look in an instrument that utilizes an Starshade to block the light from the host star. The tool allows for controlling a set of parameters of the whole instrument for: (1) the Starshade design, (2) the exoplanetary system, (3) the telescope and (4) the camera. SISTER includes plotting software, and can also store simulations on disk for plotting with other software.

[ascl:1111.008] SITools2: A Framework for Archival Systems

SITools2 is a CNES generic tool performed by a joint effort between CNES and scientific laboratories. SITools provides a self-manageable data access layer deployed on already existing scientific laboratory databases. This new version of SITools is a JAVA-based framework, under open source license, that provides a portable archive system, highly configurable, easy to use by laboratories, with a plugin mechanism so developers can add their own applications.

[ascl:1903.002] SIXTE: Simulation of X-ray Telescopes

SIXTE simulates X-Ray telescope observation; the software performs instrument performance analyses and produces simulated event files for mission and analysis studies. SIXTE strives to find a compromise between exactness of the simulation and speed. Using calibration files such as the PSF, RMF and ARF makes efficient simulations possible at comparably high speed, even though they include nonlinear effects such as pileup. Setups for some current and future missions, such as XMM-Newton and Athena, are included in the package; others can be added by the user with relatively little effort through specifying the main instrument characteristics in a flexible, human-readable XML-based format. Properties of X-ray sources to be simulated are described in a detector-independent format, i.e., the same input can be used for simulating observations with all available instruments, and the same input can also be used for simulations with the SIMX simulator. The input files are easily generated from standard data such as XSPEC (ascl:9910.005) spectral models or FITS images with tools provided with the SIXTE distribution. The input data scale well from single point sources up to very complicated setups.

[ascl:1102.020] SKID: Finding Gravitationally Bound Groups in N-body Simulations

SKID finds gravitationally bound groups in N-body simulations. The SKID program will group different types of particles depending on the type of input binary file. This could be either dark matter particles, gas particles, star particles or gas and star particles depending on what is in the input tipsy binary file. Once groups with at least a certain minimum number of members have been determined, SKID will remove particles which are not bound to the group. SKID must use the original positions of all the particles to determine whether or not particles are bound. This procedure which we call unbinding, is again dependent on the type of grouping we are dealing with. There are two cases, one for dark matter only or star particles only (case 1 unbinding), the other for inputs including gas (also stars in a dark matter environment this is case 2 unbinding).

Skid version 1.3 is a much improved version of the old denmax-1.1 version. The new name was given to avoid confusion with the DENMAX program of Gelb & Bertschinger, and although it is based on the same idea it represents a substantial evolution in the method.

[ascl:1109.003] SKIRT: Stellar Kinematics Including Radiative Transfer

SKIRT is a radiative transfer code based on the Monte Carlo technique. The name SKIRT, acronym for Stellar Kinematics Including Radiative Transfer, reflects the original motivation for its creation: it has been developed to study the effects of dust absorption and scattering on the observed kinematics of dusty galaxies. In a second stage, the SKIRT code was extended with a module to self-consistently calculate the dust emission spectrum under the assumption of local thermal equilibrium. This LTE version of SKIRT has been used to model the dust extinction and emission of various types of galaxies, as well as circumstellar discs and clumpy tori around active galactic nuclei. A new, extended version of SKIRT code can perform efficient 3D radiative transfer calculations including a self-consistent calculation of the dust temperature distribution and the associated FIR/submm emission with a full incorporation of the emission of transiently heated grains and PAH molecules.

[ascl:1609.014] Sky3D: Time-dependent Hartree-Fock equation solver

Written in Fortran 90, Sky3D solves the static or dynamic equations on a three-dimensional Cartesian mesh with isolated or periodic boundary conditions and no further symmetry assumptions. Pairing can be included in the BCS approximation for the static case. The code can be easily modified to include additional physics or special analysis of the results and requires LAPACK and FFTW3.

[ascl:2109.007] SkyCalc_ipy: SkyCalc wrapper for interactive Python

SkyCalc-iPy (SkyCalc for interactive Python) accesses atmospheric emission and transmission data generated by ESO’s SkyCalc tool interactively with Python. This package is based on the command line tool by ESO for accessing spectra on the ESO SkyCalc server.

[ascl:1109.019] SkyCat: Visualization and Catalog and Data Access Tool

SkyCat is a tool that combines visualization of images and access to catalogs and archive data for astronomy. The tool, developed in Tcl/Tk, was originally conceived as a demo of the capabilities of the class library that was developed for the VLT. The Skycat sources currently consist of five packages:

• Tclutil - Generic Tcl and C++ utilities
• Astrotcl - Astronomical Tcl and C++ utilities
• RTD - Real-time Display classes and widgets
• Catlib - Catalog library and widgets
• Skycat - Skycat application and library package

All of the required packages are always included in the tarfile.

[ascl:1408.007] Skycorr: Sky emission subtraction for observations without plain sky information

Skycorr is an instrument-independent sky subtraction code that uses physically motivated line group scaling in the reference sky spectrum by a fitting approach for an improved sky line removal in the object spectrum. Possible wavelength shifts between both spectra are corrected by fitting Chebyshev polynomials and advanced rebinning without resolution decrease. For the correction, the optimized sky line spectrum and the automatically separated sky continuum (without scaling) is subtracted from the input object spectrum. Tests show that Skycorr performs well (per cent level residuals) for data in different wavelength regimes and of different resolution, even in the cases of relatively long time lags between the object and the reference sky spectrum. Lower quality results are mainly restricted to wavelengths not dominated by airglow lines or pseudo continua by unresolved strong emission bands.

[ascl:2104.026] Skye: Equation of state for fully ionized matter

The Skye framework develops and prototypes new EOS physics; it is not tied to a specific set of physics choices and can be extended for new effects by writing new terms in the free energy. It takes into account the effects of positrons, relativity, electron degeneracy, and non-linear mixing effects and more, and determines the point of Coulomb crystallization in a self-consistent manner. It is available in the MESA (ascl:1010.083) EOS module and as a standalone package.

[ascl:2012.011] Skye: Excess clustering of transit times detection

Skye detects a statistically significant excess clustering of transit times, indicating that there are likely systematics at specific times that cause many false positive detections, for the Kepler DR25 planet candidate catalog. The technique could be used for any survey looking to statistically cull false alarms.

[ascl:1907.024] Skyfield: High precision research-grade positions for planets and Earth satellites generator

Skyfield computes positions for the stars, planets, and satellites in orbit around the Earth. Its results should agree with the positions generated by the United States Naval Observatory and their Astronomical Almanac to within 0.0005 arcseconds (which equals half a “mas” or milliarcsecond). It computes geocentric coordinates or topocentric coordinates specific to your location on the Earth’s surface. Skyfield accepts AstroPy (ascl:1304.002) time objects as input and can return results in native AstroPy units but is not dependend on AstroPy nor its compiled libraries.

[ascl:2107.014] Skylens++: Simulation package for optical astronomical observations

Skylens++ implements a Layer-based raytracing framework particularly well-suited for realistic simulations of weak and strong gravitational lensing. Source galaxies can be drawn from analytic models or deep space-based imaging. Lens planes can be populated with arbitrary deflectors, typically either from N-body simulations or analytic lens models. Both sources and lenses can be placed at freely configurable positions into the light cone, in effect allowing for multiple source and lens planes.

[ascl:2402.009] SkyLine: Generate mock line-intensity maps

SkyLine generates mock line-intensity maps (both in 3D and 2D) in a lightcone from a halo catalog, accounting for the evolution of clustering and astrophysical properties, and observational effects such as spectral and angular resolutions, line-interlopers, and galactic foregrounds. Using a given astrophysical model for the luminosity of each line, the code paints the signal for each emitter and generates the map, adding coherently all contributions of interest. In addition, SkyLine can generate maps with the distribution of Luminous Red Galaxies and Emitting Line Galaxies.

[ascl:1010.066] SkyMaker: Astronomical Image Simulations Made Easy

SkyMaker simulates astronomical images. It accepts object lists in ASCII generated by the Stuff program (ascl:1010.067) to produce realistic astronomical fields. SkyMaker is part of the EFIGI development project.

[ascl:2107.007] Skymapper: Mapping astronomical survey data on the sky

Skymapper maps astronomical survey data from the celestial sphere onto 2D using a collection of matplotlib instructions. It facilitates interactive work as well as the creation of publication-quality plots with a python-based workflow many astronomers are accustomed to. The primary motivation is a truthful representation of samples and fields from the curved sky in planar figures, which becomes relevant when sizable portions of the sky are observed.

[ascl:1710.005] SkyNet: Modular nuclear reaction network library

The general-purpose nuclear reaction network SkyNet evolves the abundances of nuclear species under the influence of nuclear reactions. SkyNet can be used to compute the nucleosynthesis evolution in all astrophysical scenarios where nucleosynthesis occurs. Any list of isotopes can be evolved and SkyNet supports various different types of nuclear reactions. SkyNet is modular, permitting new or existing physics, such as nuclear reactions or equations of state, to be easily added or modified.

[ascl:1312.007] SkyNet: Neural network training tool for machine learning in astronomy

SkyNet is an efficient and robust neural network training code for machine learning. It is able to train large and deep feed-forward neural networks, including autoencoders, for use in a wide range of supervised and unsupervised learning applications, such as regression, classification, density estimation, clustering and dimensionality reduction. SkyNet is implemented in C/C++ and fully parallelized using MPI.

[ascl:2104.016] Skyoffset: Sky offset optimization and mosaicing toolkit

Skyoffset makes wide-field mosaics of FITS images. Principal features of Skyoffset are the ability to produce a mosaic with a continuous background level by solving for sky offsets that minimize the intensity differences between overlapping images, and its handling of hierarchies, making it ideal for optimizing backgrounds in large mosaics made with array cameras (such as CFHT’s MegaCam and WIRCam). Skyoffset uses MongoDB in conjunction with Mo’Astro (ascl:2104.012) to store metadata about each mosaic and SWarp (ascl:1010.068) to handle image combination and propagate uncertainty maps. Skyoffset can be integrated into Python pipelines and offers a convenient API and metadata storage in MongoDB. It was developed originally for the Andromeda Optical and Infrared Disk Survey (ANDROIDS).

[ascl:2109.016] SkyPy: Simulating the astrophysical sky

SkyPy simulates the astrophysical sky. It provides functions that sample realizations of sources and their associated properties from probability distributions. Simulation pipelines are constructed from these models, while task scheduling and data dependencies are handled internally. The package's modular design, containing a library of physical and empirical models across a range of observables and a command line script to run end-to-end simulations, allows users to interface with external software.

[ascl:1511.003] SkyView Virtual Telescope

The SkyView Virtual telescope provides access to survey datasets ranging from radio through the gamma-ray regimes. Over 100 survey datasets are currently available. The SkyView library referenced here is used as the basis for the SkyView web site (at http://skvyiew.gsfc.nasa.gov) but is designed for individual use by researchers as well.

SkyView's approach to access surveys is distinct from most other toolkits. Rather than providing links to the original data, SkyView attempts to immediately re-render the source data in the user-requested reference frame, projection, scaling, orientation, etc. The library includes a set of geometry transformation and mosaicking tools that may be integrated into other applications independent of SkyView.

[ascl:1312.014] SL1M: Synthesis through L1 Minimization

SL1M deconvolves radio synthesis images based on direct inversion of the measured visibilities that can deal with the non-coplanar base line effect and can be applied to telescopes with direction dependent gains. The code is more computationally demanding than some existing methods, but is highly parallelizable and scale well to clusters of CPUs and GPUs. The algorithm is also extremely flexible, allowing the solution of the deconvolution problem on arbitrarily placed pixels.

[ascl:1403.025] SLALIB: A Positional Astronomy Library

SLALIB is a library of routines that make accurate and reliable positional-astronomy applications easier to write. Most SLALIB routines are concerned with astronomical position and time, but a number have wider trigonometrical, numerical or general applications. A Fortran implementation of SLALIB under GPL licensing is available as part of Starlink (ascl:1110.012).

[submitted] SLEPLET

Many fields in science and engineering measure data that inherently live on non-Euclidean geometries, such as the sphere. Techniques developed in the Euclidean setting must be extended to other geometries. Due to recent interest in geometric deep learning, analogues of Euclidean techniques must also handle general manifolds or graphs. Often, data are only observed over partial regions of manifolds, and thus standard whole-manifold techniques may not yield accurate predictions. In this thesis, a new wavelet basis is designed for datasets like these.

Although many definitions of spherical convolutions exist, none fully emulate the Euclidean definition. A novel spherical convolution is developed, designed to tackle the shortcomings of existing methods. The so-called sifting convolution exploits the sifting property of the Dirac delta and follows by the inner product of a function with the translated version of another. This translation operator is analogous to the Euclidean translation in harmonic space and exhibits some useful properties. In particular, the sifting convolution supports directional kernels; has an output that remains on the sphere; and is efficient to compute. The convolution is entirely generic and thus may be used with any set of basis functions. An application of the sifting convolution with a topographic map of the Earth demonstrates that it supports directional kernels to perform anisotropic filtering.

Slepian wavelets are built upon the eigenfunctions of the Slepian concentration problem of the manifold - a set of bandlimited functions which are maximally concentrated within a given region. Wavelets are constructed through a tiling of the Slepian harmonic line by leveraging the existing scale-discretised framework. A straightforward denoising formalism demonstrates a boost in signal-to-noise for both a spherical and general manifold example. Whilst these wavelets were inspired by spherical datasets, like in cosmology, the wavelet construction may be utilised for manifold or graph data.

[ascl:1611.021] SlicerAstro: Astronomy (HI) extension for 3D Slicer

SlicerAstro extends 3D Slicer, a multi-platform package for visualization and medical image processing, to provide a 3-D interactive viewer with 3-D human-machine interaction features, based on traditional 2-D input/output hardware, and analysis capabilities.

[ascl:1105.004] SLiM: A Code for the Simulation of Wave Propagation through an Inhomogeneous, Magnetised Solar Atmosphere

The semi-spectral linear MHD (SLiM) code follows the interaction of linear waves through an inhomogeneous three-dimensional solar atmosphere. The background model allows almost arbitrary perturbations of density, temperature, sound speed as well as magnetic and velocity fields. The code is useful in understanding the helioseismic signatures of various solar features, including sunspots.

[ascl:1409.010] Slim: Numerical data compression for scientific data sets

Slim performs lossless compression on binary data files. Written in C++, it operates very rapidly and achieves better compression on noisy physics data than general-purpose tools designed primarily for text.

[ascl:1507.005] slimplectic: Discrete non-conservative numerical integrator

slimplectic is a python implementation of a numerical integrator that uses a fixed time-step variational integrator formalism applied to the principle of stationary nonconservative action. It allows nonconservative effects to be included in the numerical evolution while preserving the major benefits of normally conservative symplectic integrators, particularly the accurate long-term evolution of momenta and energy. slimplectic is appropriate for exploring cosmological or celestial N-body dynamics problems where nonconservative interactions, e.g. dynamical friction or dissipative tides, can play an important role.

[ascl:2012.017] SLIT: Sparse Lens Inversion Technique

SLIT (Sparse Lens Inversion Technique) provides a method for inversion of lensed images in the frame of strong gravitational lensing. The code requires the input image along with lens mass profile and a PSF. The user then has to chose a maximum number of iterations after which the algorithm will stop if not converged and a image size ratio to the input image to set the resolution of the reconstructed source. Results are displayed in pyplot windows.

[ascl:9906.001] SLOPES: Least-squares linear regression lines for bivariate datasets

SLOPES computes six least-squares linear regression lines for bivariate datasets of the form (x_i,y_i) with unknown population distributions. Measurement errors, censoring (nondetections) or other complications are not treated. The lines are: the ordinary least-squares regression of y on x, OLS(Y|X); the inverse regression of x on y, OLS(X_Y); the angular bisector of the OLS lines; the orthogonal regression line; the reduced major axis, and the mean-OLS line. The latter four regressions treat the variables symmetrically, while the first two regressions are asymmetrical. Uncertainties for the regression coefficients of each method are estimated via asymptotic formulae, bootstrap resampling, and bivariate normal simulation. These methods, derivation of the regression coefficient uncertainties, and discussions of their use are provided in three papers listed below. The user is encouraged to read and reference these studies.

[ascl:1010.035] SLR: Stellar Locus Regression

Stellar Locus Regression (SLR) is a simple way to calibrate colors at the 1-2% level, and magnitudes at the sub-5% level as limited by 2MASS, without the traditional use of standard stars. With SLR, stars in any field are "standards." This is an entirely new way to calibrate photometry. SLR exploits the simple fact that most stars lie along a well defined line in color-color space called the stellar locus. Cross-match point-sources in flattened images taken through different passbands and plot up all color vs color combinations, and you will see the stellar locus with little effort. SLR calibrates colors by fitting these colors to a standard line. Cross-match with 2MASS on top of that, and SLR will deliver calibrated magnitudes as well.

[ascl:1106.012] SLUG: Stochastically Lighting Up Galaxies

The effects of stochasticity on the luminosities of stellar populations are an often neglected but crucial element for understanding populations in the low mass or low star formation rate regime. To address this issue, we present SLUG, a new code to "Stochastically Light Up Galaxies". SLUG synthesizes stellar populations using a Monte Carlo technique that treats stochastic sampling properly including the effects of clustering, the stellar initial mass function, star formation history, stellar evolution, and cluster disruption. This code produces many useful outputs, including i) catalogs of star clusters and their properties, such as their stellar initial mass distributions and their photometric properties in a variety of filters, ii) two dimensional histograms of color-magnitude diagrams of every star in the simulation, iii) and the photometric properties of field stars and the integrated photometry of the entire simulated galaxy. After presenting the SLUG algorithm in detail, we validate the code through comparisons with starburst99 in the well-sampled regime, and with observed photometry of Milky Way clusters. Finally, we demonstrate the SLUG's capabilities by presenting outputs in the stochastic regime.

[ascl:2406.003] SMART: Spectral energy distribution (SED) fitter

SMART (Spectral energy distributions Markov chain Analysis with Radiative Transfer models) implements a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method to fit the ultraviolet to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies exclusively with radiative transfer models. The models constitute four types of pre-computed libraries, which describe the starburst, active galactic nucleus (AGN) torus, host galaxy and polar dust components.

[ascl:2206.015] Smart: Automatic differentiation of accelerations and variational equations

Smart provides pre-processing for LP-VIcode (ascl:1501.007). It computes the accelerations and variational equations given a generic user-defined potential function, eliminating the need to calculate manually the accelerations and variational equations.

[ascl:1210.021] SMART: Spectroscopic Modeling Analysis and Reduction Tool

SMART is an IDL-based software tool, developed by the IRS Instrument Team at Cornell University, that allows users to reduce and analyze Spitzer data from all four modules of the Infrared Spectrograph, including the peak-up arrays. The software is designed to make full use of the ancillary files generated in the Spitzer Science Center pipeline so that it can either remove or flag artifacts and corrupted data and maximize the signal-to-noise ratio in the extraction routines. It can be run in both interactive and batch modes. SMART includes visualization tools for assessing data quality, basic arithmetic operations for either two-dimensional images or one-dimensional spectra, extraction of both point and extended sources, and a suite of spectral analysis tools.

[ascl:1603.007] SMARTIES: Spheroids Modelled Accurately with a Robust T-matrix Implementation for Electromagnetic Scattering

SMARTIES calculates the optical properties of oblate and prolate spheroidal particles, with comparable capabilities and ease-of-use as Mie theory for spheres. This suite of MATLAB codes provides a fully documented implementation of an improved T-matrix algorithm for the theoretical modelling of electromagnetic scattering by particles of spheroidal shape. Included are scripts that cover a range of scattering problems relevant to nanophotonics and plasmonics, including calculation of far-field scattering and absorption cross-sections for fixed incidence orientation, orientation-averaged cross-sections and scattering matrix, surface-field calculations as well as near-fields, wavelength-dependent near-field and far-field properties, and access to lower-level functions implementing the T-matrix calculations, including the T-matrix elements which may be calculated more accurately than with competing codes.

[ascl:1202.013] SME: Spectroscopy Made Easy

Spectroscopy Made Easy (SME) is IDL software and a compiled external library that fits an observed high-resolution stellar spectrum with a synthetic spectrum to determine stellar parameters. The SME external library is available for Mac, Linux, and Windows systems. Atomic and molecular line data formatted for SME may be obtained from VALD. SME can solve for empirical log(gf) and damping parameters, using an observed spectrum of a star (usually the Sun) as a constraint.

[ascl:1804.010] SMERFS: Stochastic Markov Evaluation of Random Fields on the Sphere

SMERFS (Stochastic Markov Evaluation of Random Fields on the Sphere) creates large realizations of random fields on the sphere. It uses a fast algorithm based on Markov properties and fast Fourier Transforms in 1d that generates samples on an n X n grid in O(n2 log n) and efficiently derives the necessary conditional covariance matrices.

[ascl:1308.001] SMILE: Orbital analysis and Schwarzschild modeling of triaxial stellar systems

SMILE is interactive software for studying a variety of 2D and 3D models, including arbitrary potentials represented by a basis-set expansion, a spherical-harmonic expansion with coefficients being smooth functions of radius (splines), or a set of fixed point masses. Its main features include:

  • orbit integration in various 2d and 3d potentials (including N-body and basis-set representations of an arbitrary potential);
  • methods for analysis of orbital class, fundamental frequencies, regular or chaotic nature of an orbit, computation of Lyapunov exponents;
  • Poincaré sections (in 2d) and frequency maps (in 3d) for analyzing orbital structure of potential;
  • construction of self-consistent Schwarzschild models; and
  • convenient visualization and integrated GUI environment, and a console scriptable version.
SMILE is portable to different platforms including MS Windows, Linux and Mac.

[ascl:1904.005] SMILI: Sparse Modeling Imaging Library for Interferometry

SMILI uses sparse sampling techniques and other regularization methods for interferometric imaging. The python-interfaced library is mainly designed for very long baseline interferometry, and has been under the active development primarily for the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT).

[ascl:1303.005] SMMOL: Spherical Multi-level MOLecular line radiative transfer

SMMOL (Spherical Multi-level MOLecular line radiative transfer) is a molecular line radiative transfer code that uses Accelerated Lambda Iteration to solve the coupled level population and line transfer problem in spherical geometry. The code uses a discretized grid and a ray tracing methodology. SMMOL is designed for high optical depth regimes and can cope with maser emission as long as the spatial-velocity sampling is fine enough.

[ascl:2206.013] smooth: Smoothing for N-body simulations

Smooth calculates several mean quantities for all particles in an N-Body simulation output file. The program produces a file for each type of output specified on the command line. This output file is in ASCII format with one smoothed quantity for each particle. The program uses a symmetric SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics) smoothing kernel to find the mean quantities.

[ascl:2312.001] smops: A sub-band model FITS image interpolator

smops interpolates input sub-band model FITS images, such as those produced by WSClean (ascl:1408.023), into more finely channelized sub-band model FITS images, thus generating model images at a higher frequency resolution. It is a Python-based command line tool. For example, given input model FITS images initially created from sub-dividing a given bandwidth into four, smops can subdivide that bandwidth further, resulting in more finely channelized model images, to a specified frequency resolution. This smooths out the stepwise behavior of models across frequency, which can improve the results of self-calibration with such models.

[ascl:1310.007] SMURF: SubMillimeter User Reduction Facility

SMURF reduces submillimeter single-dish continuum and heterodyne data. It is mainly targeted at data produced by the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope but data from other telescopes have been reduced using the package. SMURF is released as part of the bundle that comprises Starlink (ascl:1110.012) and most of the packages that use it. The two key commands are MAKEMAP for the creation of maps from sub millimeter continuum data and MAKECUBE for the creation of data cubes from heterodyne array instruments. The software can also convert data from legacy JCMT file formats to the modern form to allow it to be processed by MAKECUBE. SMURF is a core component of the ORAC-DR (ascl:1310.001) data reduction pipeline for JCMT.

[ascl:1010.027] SNANA: A Public Software Package for Supernova Analysis

SNANA is a general analysis package for supernova (SN) light curves that contains a simulation, light curve fitter, and cosmology fitter. The software is designed with the primary goal of using SNe Ia as distance indicators for the determination of cosmological parameters, but it can also be used to study efficiencies for analyses of SN rates, estimate contamination from non-Ia SNe, and optimize future surveys. Several SN models are available within the same software architecture, allowing technical features such as K-corrections to be consistently used among multiple models, and thus making it easier to make detailed comparisons between models. New and improved light-curve models can be easily added. The software works with arbitrary surveys and telescopes and has already been used by several collaborations, leading to more robust and easy-to-use code. This software is not intended as a final product release, but rather it is designed to undergo continual improvements from the community as more is learned about SNe.

[ascl:1908.010] SNAPDRAGONS: Stellar Numbers And Parameters Determined Routinely And Generated Observing N-body Systems

SNAPDRAGONS (Stellar Numbers And Parameters Determined Routinely And Generated Observing N-body Systems) is a simplified version of the population synthesis code Galaxia (ascl:1101.007), using a different process to generate the stellar catalog. It splits each N-body particle from the galaxy simulation into an appropriate number of stellar particles to create a mock catalog of observable stars from the N-body model. SNAPDRAGON uses the same isochrones and extinction map as Galaxia.

[ascl:1611.017] SNCosmo: Python library for supernova cosmology

SNCosmo synthesizes supernova spectra and photometry from SN models, and has functions for fitting and sampling SN model parameters given photometric light curve data. It offers fast implementations of several commonly used extinction laws and can be used to construct SN models that include dust. The SNCosmo library includes supernova models such as SALT2, MLCS2k2, Hsiao, Nugent, PSNID, SNANA and Whalen models, as well as a variety of built-in bandpasses and magnitude systems, and provides convenience functions for reading and writing peculiar data formats used in other packages. The library is extensible, allowing new models, bandpasses, and magnitude systems to be defined using an object-oriented interface.

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