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[ascl:1907.007] SPAM: Hu-Sawicki f(R) gravity imprints search

SPAM searches for imprints of Hu-Sawicki f(R) gravity on the rotation curves of the SPARC (Spitzer Photometry and Accurate Rotation Curves) sample using the MCMC sampler emcee (ascl:1303.002). The code provides attributes for inspecting the MCMC chains and translating names of parameters to indices. The SPAM package also contains plotting scripts.

[ascl:1408.006] SPAM: Source Peeling and Atmospheric Modeling

SPAM is a extension to AIPS for reducing high-resolution, low-frequency radio interferometric observations. Direction-dependent ionospheric calibration and image-plane ripple suppression are among the features that help to make high-quality sub-GHz images. Data reductions are captured in well-tested Python scripts that execute AIPS tasks directly (mostly during initial data reduction steps), call high-level functions that make multiple AIPS or ParselTongue calls, and require few manual operations.

[ascl:1812.005] SPAMCART: Smoothed PArticle Monte CArlo Radiative Transfer

SPAMCART generates synthetic spectral energy distributions and intensity maps from smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation snapshots. It follows discrete luminosity packets as they propagate through a density field, and computes the radiative equilibrium temperature of the ambient dust from their trajectories. The sources can be extended and/or embedded, and discrete and/or diffuse. The density is not mapped on to a grid, and therefore the calculation is performed at exactly the same resolution as the hydrodynamics. The code strictly adheres to Kirchhoff's law of radiation. The algorithm is based on the Lucy Monte Carlo radiative transfer method and is fairly simple to implement, as it uses data structures that are already constructed for other purposes in modern particle codes

[ascl:2208.013] SPAMMS: Spectroscopic PAtch Model for Massive Stars

SPAMMS (Spectroscopic PAtch Model for Massive Stars), designed with geometrically deformed systems in mind, combines the eclipsing binary modelling code PHOEBE 2 (ascl:1106.002) and the NLTE radiative transfer code FASTWIND to produce synthetic spectra for systems at given phases, orientations and geometries. SPAMMS reproduces the morphology of observed spectral line profiles for overcontact systems and the Rossiter-Mclaughlin and Struve-Sahade effects.

[ascl:1105.006] SPARC: Seismic Propagation through Active Regions and Convection

The Seismic Propagation through Active Regions and Convection (SPARC) code was developed by S. Hanasoge. The acoustic wavefield in SPARC is simulated by numerically solving the linearised 3-D Euler equations in Cartesian geometry (e.g., see Hanasoge, Duvall and Couvidat (2007)). Spatial derivatives are calculated using sixth-order compact finite differences (Lele,1992) and time evolution is achieved through the repeated application of an optimized second-order five-stage Runge-Kutta scheme (Hu, 1996). Periodic horizontal boundaries are used.

[ascl:2107.010] SpArcFiRe: SPiral ARC FInder and REporter

SpArcFiRe takes as input an image of a galaxy in FITS, JPG, or PNG format, identifies spiral arms, and extracts structural information about the spiral arms. Pixels in each arm segment are listed, enabling image analysis on each segment. The automated method also performs a least-squares fit of a logarithmic spiral arc to the pixels in that segment, giving per-arc parameters, such as the pitch angle, arm segment length, and location, and outputs images showing the steps SpArcFire took to detect arm segments.

[ascl:1905.013] SPARK: K-band Multi Object Spectrograph data reduction

SPARK (Software Package for Astronomical Reduction with KMOS), also called kmos-kit, reduces data from the K-band Multi Object Spectrograph (KMOS) for the VLT. In many cases, science data can be processed using a single recipe; alternately, all functions this recipe provides can be performed using other recipes provided as tools. Among the functions the recipes provide are sky subtraction, cube reconstruction with the application of flexure corrections, dividing out the telluric spectrum, applying an illumination correction, aligning the cubes, and then combinging them. The result is a set of files which contain the combined datacube and associated noise cube for each of the 24 integral field unit (IFUs). The pipeline includes simple error propagation.

[ascl:2103.029] SparseBLS: Box-Fitting Least Squares implementation for sparse data

SparseBLS uses the Box-fitting Least Squares (BLS) algorithm to detect transiting exoplanets in photometric data. SparseBLS does not bin data into phase bins and does not use a phase grid. Because its detection efficiency does not depend on the transit phase, it is significantly faster than BLS for sparse data and is well-suited for large photometric surveys producing unevenly-sampled sparse light curves, such as Gaia.

[ascl:1511.011] SparsePZ: Sparse Representation of Photometric Redshift PDFs

SparsePZ uses sparse basis representation to fully represent individual photometric redshift probability density functions (PDFs). This approach requires approximately half the parameters for the same multi-Gaussian fitting accuracy, and has the additional advantage that an entire PDF can be stored by using a 4-byte integer per basis function. Only 10-20 points per galaxy are needed to reconstruct both the individual PDFs and the ensemble redshift distribution, N(z), to an accuracy of 99.9 per cent when compared to the one built using the original PDFs computed with a resolution of δz = 0.01, reducing the required storage of 200 original values by a factor of 10-20. This basis representation can be directly extended to a cosmological analysis, thereby increasing computational performance without losing resolution or accuracy.

[ascl:2007.022] SPARTA: SPectroscopic vARiabiliTy Analysis

SPARTA analyzes periodically-variable spectroscopic observations. Intended for common astronomical uses, SPARTA facilitates analysis of single- and double-lined binaries, high-precision radial velocity extraction, and periodicity searches in complex, high dimensional data. It includes two modules, UNICOR and USuRPER. UNICOR analyzes spectra using 1-d CCF. It includes maximum-likelihood analysis of multi-order spectra and detection of systematic shifts. USuRPER (Unit Sphere Representation PERiodogram) is a phase-distance correlation (PDC) based periodogram and is designed for very high-dimensional data such as spectra.

[ascl:2007.003] SPARTA: Subhalo and PARticle Trajectory Analysis

SPARTA is a post-processing framework for particle-based cosmological simulations. The code is written in pure, MPI-parallelized C and is optimized for high performance. The main purpose of SPARTA is to understand the formation of structure in a dynamical sense, namely by analyzing the trajectories (or orbits) of dark matter particles around their halos. Within this framework, the user can add analysis modules that operate on individual trajectories or entire halos. The initial goal of SPARTA was to compute the splashback radius of halos, but numerous other applications have been implemented as well, including spherical overdensity calculations and tracking subhalos via their constituent particles.

[ascl:2202.015] SPARTAN: SPectroscopic And photometRic fiTting tool for Astronomical aNalysis

SPARTAN fits the spectroscopy and photometry of distant galaxies. The code implements multiple interfaces to help in the configuration of the fitting and the inspection of the results. SPARTAN relies on pre-computed input files (such as stellar population and IGM extinction), available for download, to save time in the fitting process.

[ascl:1711.001] SpcAudace: Spectroscopic processing and analysis package of Audela software

SpcAudace processes long slit spectra with automated pipelines and performs astrophysical analysis of the latter data. These powerful pipelines do all the required steps in one pass: standard preprocessing, masking of bad pixels, geometric corrections, registration, optimized spectrum extraction, wavelength calibration and instrumental response computation and correction. Both high and low resolution long slit spectra are managed for stellar and non-stellar targets. Many types of publication-quality figures can be easily produced: pdf and png plots or annotated time series plots. Astrophysical quantities can be derived from individual or large amount of spectra with advanced functions: from line profile characteristics to equivalent width and periodogram. More than 300 documented functions are available and can be used into TCL scripts for automation. SpcAudace is based on Audela open source software.

[ascl:1010.016] SpDust/SpDust.2: Code to Calculate Spinning Dust Spectra

SpDust is an IDL program that evaluates the spinning dust emissivity for user-provided environmental conditions. A new version of the code became available in March, 2010.

[ascl:1203.003] spec2d: DEEP2 DEIMOS Spectral Pipeline

The DEEP2 DEIMOS Data Reduction Pipeline ("spec2d") is an IDL-based, automated software package designed to reduce Keck/DEIMOS multi-slit spectroscopic observations, collected as part of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey. The pipeline is best suited for handling data taken with the 1200 line/mm grating tilted towards the red (lambda_c ~ 7800Å). The spec2d reduction package takes the raw DEIMOS data as its input and produces a variety of outputs including 2-d slit spectra and 1-d object spectra.

[ascl:1407.003] SPECDRE: Spectroscopy Data Reduction

Specdre performs spectroscopy data reduction and analysis. General features of the package include data cube manipulation, arc line calibration, resampling and spectral fitting. Particular care is taken with error propagation, including tracking covariance. SPECDRE is distributed as part of the Starlink software collection (ascl:1110.012).

[ascl:2311.003] Special-Blurring: Compare quantum-spacetime foam models to GRB localizations

The IDL code Special-Blurring compares models of quantum-foam-induced blurring with the full dataset of gamma-ray burst localizations available from the NASA High Energy Astrophysics Science Research Archive (as of 1 November 2022). This includes GRB221009A, which was especially bright and detected in extremely high energy TeV gamma-rays. An upper limit of the parameter alpha (giving the maximal strength of quantum blurring) can be entered, which is scaled in the model of blurring (called "Phi") operating much like "seeing" from the ground in the optical, and those calculations are plotted against the observations.

[ascl:2301.028] special: SPEctral Characterization of directly ImAged Low-mass companions

special (SPEctral Characterization of directly ImAged Low-mass companions) characterizes low-mass (M, L, T) dwarfs down to giant planets at optical/IR wavelengths. It can also be used more generally to characterize any type of object with a measured spectrum, provided a relevant input model grid, regardless of the observational method used to obtain the spectrum (direct imaging or not) and regardless of the format of the spectra (multi-band photometry, low-resolution or medium-resolution spectrum, or a combination thereof). It analyzes measured spectra, calculating the spectral correlation between channels of an IFS datacube and empirical spectral indices for MLT-dwarfs. It fits input spectra to either photo-/atmospheric model grids or a blackbody model, including additional parameters such as (extra) black body component(s), extinction and total-to-selective extinction ratio, and can use emcee (ascl:1303.002), nestle (ascl:2103.022), or UltraNest (ascl:1611.001) samplers infer posterior distributions on spectral model parameters in a Bayesian framework, among other tasks.

[ascl:2307.057] species: Atmospheric characterization of directly imaged exoplanets

species (spectral characterization and inference for exoplanet science) provides a coherent framework for spectral and photometric analysis of directly imaged exoplanets and brown dwarfs which builds on publicly-available data and models from various resources. species contains tools for grid and free retrievals using Bayesian inference, synthetic photometry, interpolating a variety atmospheric and evolutionary model grids (including the possibility to add a custom grid), color-magnitude and color-color diagrams, empirical spectral analysis, spectral and photometric calibration, and analysis of emission lines.

[ascl:1404.014] SpecPro: Astronomical spectra viewer and analyzer

SpecPro is an interactive program for viewing and analyzing spectra, particularly in the context of modern imaging surveys. In addition to displaying the 1D and 2D spectrum, SpecPro can simultaneously display available stamp images as well as the spectral energy distribution of a source. This extra information can help significantly in assessing a spectrum.

[ascl:1904.018] Specstack: A simple spectral stacking tool

Specstack creates stacked spectra using a simple algorithm with sigma-clipping to combine the spectra of galaxies in the rest-frame into a single averaged spectrum. Though written originally for galaxy spectra, it also works for other types of objects. It is written in Python and is started from the command-line.

[ascl:1111.005] SPECTCOL: Spectroscopic and Collisional Data Retrieval

Studies of astrophysical non-LTE media require the combination of atomic and molecular spectroscopic and collisional data often described differently in various databases. SPECTCOL is a tool that implements VAMDC standards, retrieve relevant information from different databases such as CDMS, HITRAN, BASECOL, and can upload local files. All transfer of data between the client and the databases use the VAMDC-XSAMS schema. The spectroscopic and collisional information is combined and useful outputs (ascii or xsams) are provided for the study of the interstellar medium.

[ascl:2108.011] Spectra-Without-Windows: Window-free analysis of the BOSS DR12 power spectrum and bispectrum

Spectra-Without-Windows (formerly called BOSS-Without-Windows) analyzes Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) DR12 data using quadratic and cubic estimators. It contains analysis codes to estimate unwindowed power spectra and unwindowed bispectra. It also supplies the raw power and bispectrum spectrum measurements of BOSS and 999 Patchy simulations, and contains a utility function to generate the background number density, n(r) from the survey mask and n(z) distribution. This code has been replaced by the newer and more powerful 3D polyspectrum code PolyBin3D (ascl:2404.006).

[ascl:1701.003] Spectra: Time series power spectrum calculator

Spectra calculates the power spectrum of a time series equally spaced or not based on the Spectral Correlation Coefficient (Ferraz-Mello 1981, Astron. Journal 86 (4), 619). It is very efficient for detection of low frequencies.

[ascl:2104.004] Spectractor: Spectrum extraction tool for slitless spectrophotometry

Spectractor extracts spectra from slitless spectrophotometric images and measures the atmospheric transmission on the line of sight if standard stars are targeted. It has been optimized on CTIO images but can be configured to analyze any kind of slitless data that contains the order 0 and the order 1 of a spectrum. In particular, it can be used to estimate the atmospheric transmission of the Vera Rubin Observatory site using the dedicated Auxiliary Telescope.

[ascl:1609.017] spectral-cube: Read and analyze astrophysical spectral data cubes

Spectral-cube provides an easy way to read, manipulate, analyze, and write data cubes with two positional dimensions and one spectral dimension, optionally with Stokes parameters. It is a versatile data container for building custom analysis routines. It provides a uniform interface to spectral cubes, robust to the wide range of conventions of axis order, spatial projections, and spectral units that exist in the wild, and allows easy extraction of cube sub-regions using physical coordinates. It has the ability to create, combine, and apply masks to datasets and is designed to work with datasets too large to load into memory, and provide basic summary statistic methods like moments and array aggregates.

[ascl:2209.017] SpectraPy: Extract and reduce astronomical spectral data

SpectraPy collects algorithms and methods for data reduction of astronomical spectra obtained by a through slits spectrograph. It produces two-dimensional wavelength calibrated spectra corrected by instrument distortions. The library is designed to be spectrograph independent and can be used on both longslit (LS) and multi object spectrograph (MOS) data. SpectraPy comes with a set of already configured spectrographs, but it can be easily configured to reduce data of other instruments.

[ascl:1202.010] SPECTRE: Manipulation of single-order spectra

SPECTRE's chief purpose is the manipulation of single-order spectra, and it performs many of the tasks contained in such IRAF routines as "splot" and "rv". It is not meant to replace the much more general capabilities of IRAF, but does some functions in a manner that some might find useful. A brief list of SPECTRE tasks are: spectrum smoothing; equivalent width calculation; continuum rectification; noise spike excision; and spectrum comparison. SPECTRE was written to manipulate coude spectra, and thus is probably most useful for working on high dispersion spectra. Echelle spectra can be gathered from various observatories, reduced to singly-dimensioned spectra using IRAF, then written out as FITS files, thus becoming accessible to SPECTRE. Three different spectra may be manipulated and displayed simultaneously. SPECTRE, written in standard FORTRAN77, can be used only with the SM graphics package.

[ascl:2104.019] SpectRes: Simple spectral resampling

SpectRes efficiently resamples spectra and their associated uncertainties onto an arbitrary wavelength grid. The Python function works with any grid of wavelength values, including non-uniform sampling, and preserves the integrated flux. This may be of use for binning data to increase the signal to noise ratio, obtaining synthetic photometry, or resampling model spectra to match the sampling of observational data.

[submitted] spectroflat

Spectroflat is a generic python calibration library for spectro-polarimetric data. It can be plugged into existing python based data reduction pipelines or used as a standalone calibration and performance ananlzsis tool.
It includes smile distortion correction and flat field extraction.

[submitted] spectrogrism

This module implements an ad-hoc grism-based spectrograph optical model. It provides a flexible chromatic mapping between the input focal plane and the output detector plane, based on an effective simplified ray-tracing model of the key optical elements defining the spectrograph (collimator, prism, grating, camera), described by a restricted number of physically-motivated distortion parameters.

[ascl:9910.002] SPECTRUM: A stellar spectral synthesis program

SPECTRUM ((C) Richard O. Gray, 1992-2008) is a stellar spectral synthesis program which runs on a number of platforms, including most flavors of UNIX and LINUX. It will also run under Windwos 9x/ME/NT/2000/XP using the Cygwin tools or the distributed Windows binaries. The code for SPECTRUM has been written in the "C" language. SPECTRUM computes the LTE synthetic spectrum given a stellar atmosphere model. SPECTRUM can use as input the fully blanketed stellar atmosphere models of Robert Kurucz including the new models of Castelli and Kurucz, but any other stellar atmosphere model which can be cast into the format of Kurucz's models can be used as well. SPECTRUM can be programmed with "command-line switches" to give a number of different outputs. In the default mode, SPECTRUM computes the stellar-disk-integrated normalized-intensity spectrum, but in addition, SPECTRUM will compute the absolute monochromatic flux from the stellar atmosphere or the specific intensity from any point on the stellar surface.

[ascl:1902.012] Specutils: Spectroscopic analysis and reduction

Specutils provides a basic interface for the loading, manipulation, and common forms of analysis of spectroscopic data. Its generic data containers and accompanying modules can be used to build a particular scientific workflow or higher-level analysis tool. It is an AstroPy (ascl:1304.002) affiliated package, and SpecViz (ascl:1902.011), which is built on top of Specutils, provides a visual, interactive interface to its analysis capabilities.

[ascl:1210.016] Specview: 1-D spectral visualization and analysis of astronomical spectrograms

Specview is a tool for 1-D spectral visualization and analysis of astronomical spectrograms. Written in Java, it is capable of reading all the Hubble Space Telescope spectral data formats as well as data from several other instruments (such as IUE, FUSE, ISO, FORS and SDSS), preview spectra from MAST, and data from generic FITS and ASCII tables. It can read data from Virtual Observatory servers, and read and write spectrogram data in Virtual Observatory SED format. It can also read files in the SPC Galactic format used in the chemistry field. Once ingested, data can be plotted and examined with a large selection of custom settings. Specview supports instrument-specific data quality handling, flexible spectral units conversions, custom plotting attributes, plot annotations, tiled plots, hardcopy to JPEG files and PostScript file or printer, etc. Specview can be used to build wide-band SEDs, overplotting or combining data from the same astronomical source taken with different instruments and/or spectral bands. Data can be further processed with averaging, splicing, detrending, and Fourier filtering tools. Specview has a spectral model fitting capability that enables the user to work with multi-component models (including user-defined models) and fit models to data.

[ascl:1902.011] SpecViz: 1D Spectral Visualization Tool

SpecViz interactively visualizes and analyzes 1D astronomical spectra. It reads data from FITS and ASCII tables and allows spectra to be easily plotted and examined. It supports instrument-specific data quality handling, flexible spectral units conversions, custom plotting attributes, plot annotations, tiled plots, among other features. SpecViz includes a measurement tool for spectral lines for performing and recording measurements and a model fitting capability for creating simple (e.g., single Gaussian) or multi-component models (e.g., multiple Gaussians for emission and absorption lines in addition to regions of flat continua). SpecViz is built on top of the Specutils (ascl:1902.012) Astropy-affiliated python library, providing a visual, interactive interface to the analysis capabilities in that library.

The functionality of SpecViz is now actively developed as part of Jdaviz (ascl:2307.001).

[ascl:1310.008] SPECX: Spectral Line Data Reduction Package

SPECX is a general purpose line data reduction system. It can read and write FITS data cubes but has specialist support for the GSD format data from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. It includes commands to store and retrieve intermediate spectra in storage registers and perform the fitting and removal of polynomial, harmonic and Gaussian baselines.

SPECX can filter and edit spectra and list and display spectra on a graphics terminal. It is able to perform Fourier transform and power spectrum calculations, process up to eight spectra (quadrants) simultaneously with either the same or different center, and assemble a number of reduced individual spectra into a map file and contour or greyscale any plane or planes of the resulting cube.

Two versions of SPECX are distributed. Version 6.x is the VMS and Unix version and is distributed as part of the Starlink software collection. Version 7.x is a complete rewrite of SPECX distributed for Windows.

[ascl:2405.001] SPEDAS: Space Physics Environment Data Analysis System

The SPEDAS (Space Physics Environment Data Analysis Software) framework supports multi-mission data ingestion, analysis and visualization for the Space Physics community. It standardizes the retrieval of data from distributed repositories, the scientific processing with a powerful set of legacy routines, the quick visualization with full output control and the graph creation for use in papers and presentations. SPEDAS includes a GUI for ease of use by novice users, works on multiple platforms, and though based on IDL, can be used with or without an IDL license. The framework supports plugin modules for multiple projects such as THEMIS, MMS, and WIND, and provides interfaces for software modules developed by the individual teams of those missions. A Python implementation of the framework, PySPEDAS (ascl:2405.005), is also available.

[ascl:1807.014] SPEGID: Single-Pulse Event Group IDentification

SPEGID (Single-Pulse Event Group IDentification) identifies astrophysical pulse candidates as trial single-pulse event groups (SPEGs) by first applying Density Based Spatial Clustering of Applications with Noise (DBSCAN) on trial single-pulse events and then merging the clusters that fall within the expected DM (Dispersion Measure) and time span of astrophysical pulses. SPEGID also calculates the peak score for each SPEG in the S/N versus DM space to identify the expected peak-like shape in the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio versus DM curve of astrophysical pulses. Additionally, SPEGID groups SPEGs that appear at a consistent DM and therefore are likely emitted from the same source. After running SPEGID, periocity.py can be used to find (or verify) the underlying periodicity among a group of SPEGs (i.e., astrophysical pulse candidates).

[ascl:2212.026] Spender: Neural spectrum encoder and decoder

Spender establishes a restframe for galaxy spectra that has higher resolution and larger wavelength range than the spectra from which it is trained. The model can be trained from spectra at different redshifts or even from different instruments without the need to standardize the observations. Spender also has an explicit, differentiable redshift dependence, which can be coupled with a redshift estimator for a fully data-driven spectrum analysis pipeline. The code describes the restframe spectrum by an autoencoder and transforms the restframe model to the observed redshift; it also matches the spectral resolution and line spread function of the instrument.

[ascl:2007.004] spex_to_xspec: Convert SPEX output to XSPEC input

spex_to_xspec takes the output from the collisional ionisation equilibrium model in the SPEX spectral modelling and fitting package (ascl:1308.014), and converts it into a form usable by the XSPEC spectral fitting package (ascl:9910.005). For a list of temperatures it computes the line strengths and continuum spectra using SPEX. These are collated and written into an APEC-format table model which can be loaded into Xspec. By allowing SPEX models to be loaded into XSPEC, the program allows easy comparison between the results of the SPEX and APEC codes.

[ascl:1308.014] SPEX: High-resolution cosmic X-ray spectra analysis

SPEX is optimized for the analysis and interpretation of high-resolution cosmic X-ray spectra. The software is especially suited for fitting spectra obtained by current X-ray observatories like XMM-Newton, Chandra, and Suzaku. SPEX can fit multiple spectra with different model components simultaneously and handles highly complex models with many free parameters.

[ascl:2007.017] SPEX: Spectral Executive

SPEX provides a uniform interface suitable for the X-ray spectral analysis of a number of solar (or other) instruments in the X and Gamma Ray energy ranges. Part of the SolarSoft (ascl:1208.013) library, this package is suitable for any datastream which can be placed in the form of response vs interval where the response is usually a counting rate (spectrum) and the interval is normally an accumulation over time. Together with an algorithm which can be used to relate a model input spectrum to the observed response, generally a response matrix, the dataset is amenable to analysis with this package. Currently the data from a large number of instruments, including SMM (HXRBS, GRS Gamma, GRS X1, and GRS X2), Yohkoh (HXT, HXS, GRS, and SXT,) CGRO (BATSE SPEC and BATSE LAD), WIND (TGRS), HIREX, and NEAR (PIN). SPEX's next generation software is available in OSPEX (ascl:2007.018), an object-oriented package that is also part of and dependent on SolarSoft.

[ascl:1404.017] Spextool: Spectral EXtraction tool

Spextool (Spectral EXtraction tool) is an IDL-based data reduction package for SpeX, a medium resolution near-infrared spectrograph on the NASA IRTF. It performs all of the steps necessary to produce spectra ready for analysis and publication including non-linearity corrections, flat fielding, wavelength calibration, telluric correction, flux calibration, and order merging.

[ascl:9912.001] SPH_1D: Hierarchical gravity/SPH treecode for simulations of interacting galaxies

We describe a fast tree algorithm for gravitational N-body simulation on SIMD parallel computers. The tree construction uses fast, parallel sorts. The sorted lists are recursively divided along their x, y and z coordinates. This data structure is a completely balanced tree (i.e., each particle is paired with exactly one other particle) and maintains good spatial locality. An implementation of this tree-building algorithm on a 16k processor Maspar MP-1 performs well and constitutes only a small fraction (approximately 15%) of the entire cycle of finding the accelerations. Each node in the tree is treated as a monopole. The tree search and the summation of accelerations also perform well. During the tree search, node data that is needed from another processor is simply fetched. Roughly 55% of the tree search time is spent in communications between processors. We apply the code to two problems of astrophysical interest. The first is a simulation of the close passage of two gravitationally, interacting, disk galaxies using 65,636 particles. We also simulate the formation of structure in an expanding, model universe using 1,048,576 particles. Our code attains speeds comparable to one head of a Cray Y-MP, so single instruction, multiple data (SIMD) type computers can be used for these simulations. The cost/performance ratio for SIMD machines like the Maspar MP-1 make them an extremely attractive alternative to either vector processors or large multiple instruction, multiple data (MIMD) type parallel computers. With further optimizations (e.g., more careful load balancing), speeds in excess of today's vector processing computers should be possible.

[ascl:2105.007] SpheCow: Galaxy and dark matter halo dynamical properties

SpheCow explores the structure and dynamics of any spherical model for galaxies and dark matter haloes. The lightweight and flexible code automatically calculates the dynamical properties, assuming an isotropic or Osipkov-Merritt anisotropic orbital structure, of any model with either an analytical density profile or an analytical surface density profile as a starting point. SpheCow contains readily usable implementations for many standard models, including the Plummer, Hernquist, NFW, Einasto, Sérsic and Nuker models. The code is easily extendable, allowing new models to be added in a straightforward way. The code is publicly available as a set of C++ routines and as a Python module.

[ascl:1806.023] Spheral++: Coupled hydrodynamical and gravitational numerical simulations

Spheral++ provides a steerable parallel environment for performing coupled hydrodynamical and gravitational numerical simulations. Hydrodynamics and gravity are modeled using particle-based methods (SPH and N-Body). It uses an Adaptive Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (ASPH) algorithm, provides a total energy conserving compatible hydro mode, and performs fluid and solid material modeling and damage and fracture modeling in solids.

[ascl:1309.004] Spherical: Geometry operations and searches on spherical surfaces

The Spherical Library provides an efficient and accurate mathematical representation of shapes on the celestial sphere, such as sky coverage and footprints. Shapes of arbitrary complexity and size can be dynamically created from simple building blocks, whose exact area is also analytically computed. This methodology is also perfectly suited for censoring problematic parts of datasets, e.g., bad seeing, satellite trails or diffraction spikes of bright stars.

[ascl:1311.005] Spheroid: Electromagnetic Scattering by Spheroids

Spheroid determines the size distribution of polarizing interstellar dust grains based on electromagnetic scattering by spheroidal particles. It contains subroutines to treat the case of complex refractive indices, and also includes checks for some limiting cases.

[ascl:1502.012] SPHGR: Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics Galaxy Reduction

SPHGR (Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics Galaxy Reduction) is a python based open-source framework for analyzing smoothed-particle hydrodynamic simulations. Its basic form can run a baryonic group finder to identify galaxies and a halo finder to identify dark matter halos; it can also assign said galaxies to their respective halos, calculate halo & galaxy global properties, and iterate through previous time steps to identify the most-massive progenitors of each halo and galaxy. Data about each individual halo and galaxy is collated and easy to access.

SPHGR supports a wide range of simulations types including N-body, full cosmological volumes, and zoom-in runs. Support for multiple SPH code outputs is provided by pyGadgetReader (ascl:1411.001), mainly Gadget (ascl:0003.001) and TIPSY (ascl:1111.015).

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