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[ascl:1511.009] Pangloss: Reconstructing lensing mass

Pangloss reconstructs all the mass within a light cone through the Universe. Understanding complex mass distributions like this is important for accurate time delay lens cosmography, and also for accurate lens magnification estimation. It aspires to use all available data in an attempt to make the best of all mass maps.

[ascl:2404.010] Panphasia: Create cosmological and resimulation initial conditions

Panphasia computes a very large realization of a Gaussian white noise field. The field has a hierarchical structure based on an octree geometry with 50 octree levels fully populated. The code sets up Gaussian initial conditions for cosmological simulations and resimulations of structure formation. Panphasia provides an easy way to publish the linear phases used to set up cosmological simulation initial conditions; publishing phases enriches the literature and makes it easier to reproduce and extend published simulation work.

[ascl:2105.020] PAP: PHANGS-ALMA pipeline

The PHANGS-ALMA pipeline process data from radio interferometer observations. It uses CASA (ascl:1107.013), AstroPy (ascl:1304.002), and other affiliated packages to process data from calibrated visibilities to science-ready spectral cubes and maps. The PHANGS-ALMA pipeline offers a flexible alternative to the scriptForImaging script distributed by ALMA. The pipeline runs in two separate software environments: CASA 5.6 or 5.7 (staging, imaging and post-processing) and Python 3.6 or later (derived products) with modern versions of several packages.

[ascl:1103.008] Parallel HOP: A Scalable Halo Finder for Massive Cosmological Data Sets

Modern N-body cosmological simulations contain billions ($10^9$) of dark matter particles. These simulations require hundreds to thousands of gigabytes of memory, and employ hundreds to tens of thousands of processing cores on many compute nodes. In order to study the distribution of dark matter in a cosmological simulation, the dark matter halos must be identified using a halo finder, which establishes the halo membership of every particle in the simulation. The resources required for halo finding are similar to the requirements for the simulation itself. In particular, simulations have become too extensive to use commonly-employed halo finders, such that the computational requirements to identify halos must now be spread across multiple nodes and cores. Here we present a scalable-parallel halo finding method called Parallel HOP for large-scale cosmological simulation data. Based on the halo finder HOP, it utilizes MPI and domain decomposition to distribute the halo finding workload across multiple compute nodes, enabling analysis of much larger datasets than is possible with the strictly serial or previous parallel implementations of HOP. We provide a reference implementation of this method as a part of the toolkit yt, an analysis toolkit for Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) data that includes complementary analysis modules. Additionally, we discuss a suite of benchmarks that demonstrate that this method scales well up to several hundred tasks and datasets in excess of $2000^3$ particles. The Parallel HOP method and our implementation can be readily applied to any kind of N-body simulation data and is therefore widely applicable. Parallel HOP is part of yt.

[ascl:1106.009] PARAMESH V4.1: Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement

PARAMESH is a package of Fortran 90 subroutines designed to provide an application developer with an easy route to extend an existing serial code which uses a logically cartesian structured mesh into a parallel code with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Alternatively, in its simplest use, and with minimal effort, it can operate as a domain decomposition tool for users who want to parallelize their serial codes, but who do not wish to use adaptivity.

The package builds a hierarchy of sub-grids to cover the computational domain, with spatial resolution varying to satisfy the demands of the application. These sub-grid blocks form the nodes of a tree data-structure (quad-tree in 2D or oct-tree in 3D). Each grid block has a logically cartesian mesh. The package supports 1, 2 and 3D models. PARAMESH is released under the NASA-wide Open-Source software license.

[ascl:1010.039] Parameter Estimation from Time-Series Data with Correlated Errors: A Wavelet-Based Method and its Application to Transit Light Curves

We consider the problem of fitting a parametric model to time-series data that are afflicted by correlated noise. The noise is represented by a sum of two stationary Gaussian processes: one that is uncorrelated in time, and another that has a power spectral density varying as $1/f^gamma$. We present an accurate and fast [O(N)] algorithm for parameter estimation based on computing the likelihood in a wavelet basis. The method is illustrated and tested using simulated time-series photometry of exoplanetary transits, with particular attention to estimating the midtransit time. We compare our method to two other methods that have been used in the literature, the time-averaging method and the residual-permutation method. For noise processes that obey our assumptions, the algorithm presented here gives more accurate results for midtransit times and truer estimates of their uncertainties.

[ascl:2009.008] Paramo: PArticle and RAdiation MOnitor

Paramo (PArticle and RAdiation MOnitor) numerically solves the Fokker-Planck kinetic equation, which is used to model the dynamics of a particle distribution function, using a robust implicit method, for the proper modeling of the acceleration processes, and accounts for accurate cooling coefficient (e.g., radiative cooling with Klein-Nishina corrections). The numerical solution at every time step is used to calculate radiations processes, namely synchrotron and IC, with sophisticated numerical techniques, obtaining the multi-wavelength spectral evolution of the system.

[ascl:2008.016] ParaMonte: Parallel Monte Carlo library

ParaMonte contains serial and parallel Monte Carlo routines for sampling mathematical objective functions of arbitrary-dimensions. It is used for posterior distributions of Bayesian models in data science, Machine Learning, and scientific inference and unifies the automation of Monte Carlo simulations. ParaMonte is user friendly and accessible from multiple programming environments, including C, C++, Fortran, MATLAB, and Python, and offers high performance at runtime and scalability across many parallel processors.

[ascl:1103.014] ParaView: Data Analysis and Visualization Application

ParaView is an open-source, multi-platform data analysis and visualization application. ParaView users can quickly build visualizations to analyze their data using qualitative and quantitative techniques. The data exploration can be done interactively in 3D or programmatically using ParaView's batch processing capabilities.

ParaView was developed to analyze extremely large datasets using distributed memory computing resources. It can be run on supercomputers to analyze datasets of terascale as well as on laptops for smaller data.

[ascl:1601.010] PARAVT: Parallel Voronoi Tessellation

PARAVT offers massive parallel computation of Voronoi tessellations (VT hereafter) in large data sets. The code is focused for astrophysical purposes where VT densities and neighbors are widely used. There are several serial Voronoi tessellation codes, however no open source and parallel implementations are available to handle the large number of particles/galaxies in current N-body simulations and sky surveys. Parallelization is implemented under MPI and VT using Qhull library. Domain decomposition take into account consistent boundary computation between tasks, and support periodic conditions. In addition, the code compute neighbors lists, Voronoi density and Voronoi cell volumes for each particle, and can compute density on a regular grid.

[ascl:2007.014] PARS: Paint the Atmospheres of Rotating Stars

PARS (Paint the Atmospheres of Rotating Stars) quickly computes magnitudes and spectra of rotating stellar models. It uses the star's mass, equatorial radius, rotational speed, luminosity, and inclination as input; the models incorporate Roche mass distribution (where all mass is at the center of the star), solid body rotation, and collinearity of effective gravity and energy flux.

[ascl:1502.005] PARSEC: PARametrized Simulation Engine for Cosmic rays

PARSEC (PARametrized Simulation Engine for Cosmic rays) is a simulation engine for fast generation of ultra-high energy cosmic ray data based on parameterizations of common assumptions of UHECR origin and propagation. Implemented are deflections in unstructured turbulent extragalactic fields, energy losses for protons due to photo-pion production and electron-pair production, as well as effects from the expansion of the universe. Additionally, a simple model to estimate propagation effects from iron nuclei is included. Deflections in the Galactic magnetic field are included using a matrix approach with precalculated lenses generated from backtracked cosmic rays. The PARSEC program is based on object oriented programming paradigms enabling users to extend the implemented models and is steerable with a graphical user interface.

[ascl:1208.020] ParselTongue: AIPS Python Interface

ParselTongue is a Python interface to classic AIPS, Obit and possibly other task-based data reduction packages. It serves as the software infrastructure for some of the ALBUS implementation. It allows you to run AIPS tasks, and access AIPS headers and extension tables from Python. There is also support for running Obit tasks and accessing data in FITS files. Full access to the visibilities in AIPS UV data is also available.

[ascl:2110.008] ParSNIP: Parametrization of SuperNova Intrinsic Properties

ParSNIP learns generative models of transient light curves from a large dataset of transient light curves. It is designed to work with light curves in sncosmo format using the lcdata package to handle large datasets. This code can be used for classification of transients, cosmological distance estimation, and identifying novel transients.

[ascl:2306.026] Parthenon: Portable block-structured adaptive mesh refinement framework

The Parthenon framework, derived from Athena++ (ascl:1912.005), handles massively-parallel, device-accelerated adaptive mesh refinement. It provides a device first/device resident approach, transparent packing of data across blocks (to reduce/hide kernel launch latency), and direct device-to-device communication via asynchronous, one-sided MPI communication to enable high performance. Parthenon uses an intermediate abstraction layer to hide complexity of device kernel launches, offers support for particles and abstract variable control via metadata tags, and has a flexible plug-in package system.

[ascl:1010.005] Particle module of Piernik MHD code

Piernik is a multi-fluid grid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code based on the Relaxing Total Variation Diminishing (RTVD) conservative scheme. The original code has been extended by addition of dust described within the particle approximation. The dust is now described as a system of interacting particles. The particles can interact with gas, which is described as a fluid. The comparison between the test problem results and the results coming from fluid simulations made with Piernik code shows the most important differences between fluid and particle approximations used to describe dynamical evolution of dust under astrophysical conditions.

[ascl:2207.029] ParticleGridMapper: Particle data interpolator

ParticleGridMapper.jl interpolates particle data onto either a Cartesian (uniform) grid or an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) grid where each cell contains no more than one particle. The AMR grid can be trimmed with a user-defined maximum level of refinement. Three different interpolation schemes are supported: nearest grid point (NGP), smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH), and Meshless finite mass (MFM). It is multi-threading parallel.

[ascl:1010.073] partiview: Immersive 4D Interactive Visualization of Large-Scale Simulations

In dense clusters a bewildering variety of interactions between stars can be observed, ranging from simple encounters to collisions and other mass-transfer encounters. With faster and special-purpose computers like GRAPE, the amount of data per simulation is now exceeding 1TB. Visualization of such data has now become a complex 4D data-mining problem, combining space and time, and finding interesting events in these large datasets. We have recently starting using the virtual reality simulator, installed in the Hayden Planetarium in the American Museum for Natural History, to tackle some of these problem. partiview is a program that enables you to visualize and animate particle data. partiview runs on relatively simple desktops and laptops, but is mostly compatible with its big brother VirDir.

[ascl:1809.003] PASTA: Python Astronomical Stacking Tool Array

PASTA performs median stacking of astronomical sources. Written in Python, it can filter sources, provide stack statistics, generate Karma annotations, format source lists, and read information from stacked Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) images. PASTA was originally written to examine polarization stack properties and includes a Monte Carlo modeler for obtaining true polarized intensity from the observed polarization of a stack. PASTA is also useful as a generic stacking tool, even if polarization properties are not being examined.

[ascl:1102.002] PBL: Particle-Based Lensing for Gravitational Lensing Mass Reconstructions of Galaxy Clusters

We present Particle-Based Lensing (PBL), a new technique for gravitational lensing mass reconstructions of galaxy clusters. Traditionally, most methods have employed either a finite inversion or gridding to turn observational lensed galaxy ellipticities into an estimate of the surface mass density of a galaxy cluster. We approach the problem from a different perspective, motivated by the success of multi-scale analysis in smoothed particle hydrodynamics. In PBL, we treat each of the lensed galaxies as a particle and then reconstruct the potential by smoothing over a local kernel with variable smoothing scale. In this way, we can tune a reconstruction to produce constant signal-noise throughout, and maximally exploit regions of high information density.

PBL is designed to include all lensing observables, including multiple image positions and fluxes from strong lensing, as well as weak lensing signals including shear and flexion. In this paper, however, we describe a shear-only reconstruction, and apply the method to several test cases, including simulated lensing clusters, as well as the well-studied ``Bullet Cluster'' (1E0657-56). In the former cases, we show that PBL is better able to identify cusps and substructures than are grid-based reconstructions, and in the latter case, we show that PBL is able to identify substructure in the Bullet Cluster without even exploiting strong lensing measurements.

[ascl:1708.007] PBMC: Pre-conditioned Backward Monte Carlo code for radiative transport in planetary atmospheres

PBMC (Pre-Conditioned Backward Monte Carlo) solves the vector Radiative Transport Equation (vRTE) and can be applied to planetary atmospheres irradiated from above. The code builds the solution by simulating the photon trajectories from the detector towards the radiation source, i.e. in the reverse order of the actual photon displacements. In accounting for the polarization in the sampling of photon propagation directions and pre-conditioning the scattering matrix with information from the scattering matrices of prior (in the BMC integration order) photon collisions, PBMC avoids the unstable and biased solutions of classical BMC algorithms for conservative, optically-thick, strongly-polarizing media such as Rayleigh atmospheres.

[ascl:1403.007] PC: Unified EOS for neutron stars

The equation of state (EOS) of dense matter is a crucial input for the neutron-star structure calculations. This Fortran code can obtain a "unified EOS" in the many-body calculations based on a single effective nuclear Hamiltonian, and is valid in all regions of the neutron star interior. For unified EOSs, the transitions between the outer crust and the inner crust and between the inner crust and the core are obtained as a result of many-body calculations.

[ascl:1207.012] PCA: Principal Component Analysis for spectra modeling

The mid-infrared spectra of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) contain a variety of spectral features that can be used as diagnostics to characterize the spectra. However, such diagnostics are biased by our prior prejudices on the origin of the features. Moreover, by using only part of the spectrum they do not utilize the full information content of the spectra. Blind statistical techniques such as principal component analysis (PCA) consider the whole spectrum, find correlated features and separate them out into distinct components.

This code, written in IDL, classifies principal components of IRS spectra to define a new classification scheme using 5D Gaussian mixtures modelling. The five PCs and average spectra for the four classifications to classify objects are made available with the code.

[ascl:1705.004] PCAT: Probabilistic Cataloger

PCAT (Probabilistic Cataloger) samples from the posterior distribution of a metamodel, i.e., union of models with different dimensionality, to compare the models. This is achieved via transdimensional proposals such as births, deaths, splits and merges in addition to the within-model proposals. This method avoids noisy estimates of the Bayesian evidence that may not reliably distinguish models when sampling from the posterior probability distribution of each model.

The code has been applied in two different subfields of astronomy: high energy photometry, where transdimensional elements are gamma-ray point sources; and strong lensing, where light-deflecting dark matter subhalos take the role of transdimensional elements.

[ascl:1809.002] PCCDPACK: Polarimetry with CCD

PCCDPACK analyzes polarimetry data. The set of routines is written in CL-IRAF (including compiled Fortran codes) and analyzes dozens of point objects simultaneously on the same CCD image. A subpackage, specpol, is included to analyze spectropolarimetry data.

[ascl:2309.011] PCOSTPD: Periodogram Comparison for Optimizing Small Transiting Planet Detection

The Periodogram Comparison for Optimizing Small Transiting Planet Detection R code compares two periodogram algorithms for detecting transiting exoplanets: the Box-fitting Least Squares (BLS) and the Transit Comb Filter (TCF). It calculates the False Alarm Probability (FAP) based on extreme value theory and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) metrics to quantify periodogram peak significance. The comparison approach is aimed at optimizing the detection of small transiting planets in future transiting exoplanet surveys. The code can be extended for comparing any set of periodograms.

[ascl:2211.014] PDFchem: Average abundance of species from Av-PDFs

PDFchem models the cold ISM at moderate and large scales using functions connecting the quantities of the local and the observed visual extinctions and the local number density with probability density functions. For any given observed visual extinction sampled with thousands of clouds, the algorithm instantly computes the average abundances of the most important species and performs radiative transfer calculations to estimate the average emission of the most commonly observed lines.

[ascl:2105.002] PDM2: Phase Dispersion Minimization

PDM2 (Phase Dispersion Minimization) ddetermines periodic components of data sets with erratic time intervals, poor coverage, non-sine-wave curve shape, and/or large noise components. Essentially a least-squares fitting technique, the fit is relative to the mean curve as defined by the means of each bin; the code simultaneously obtains the best least-squares light curve and the best period. PDM2 allows an arbitrary degree of smoothing and provides improved curve fits, suppressed subharmonics, and beta function statistics.

[ascl:1102.022] PDRT: Photo Dissociation Region Toolbox

Ultraviolet photons from O and B stars strongly influence the structure and emission spectra of the interstellar medium. The UV photons energetic enough to ionize hydrogen (hν > 13.6 eV) will create the H II region around the star, but lower energy UV photons escape. These far-UV photons (6 eV < hν < 13.6 eV) are still energetic enough to photodissociate molecules and to ionize low ionization-potential atoms such as carbon, silicon, and sulfur. They thus create a photodissociation region (PDR) just outside the H II region. In aggregate, these PDRs dominate the heating and cooling of the neutral interstellar medium.

The PDR Toolbox is a science-enabling Python package for the community, designed to help astronomers determine the physical parameters of photodissociation regions from observations. Typical observations of both Galactic and extragalactic PDRs come from ground- and space-based millimeter, submillimeter, and far-infrared telescopes such as ALMA, SOFIA, JWST, Spitzer, and Herschel. Given a set of observations of spectral line or continuum intensities, PDR Toolbox can compute best-fit FUV incident intensity and cloud density based on our models of PDR emission.

[ascl:2207.026] pdspy: MCMC tool for continuum and spectral line radiative transfer modeling

pdspy fits Monte Carlo radiative transfer models for protostellar/protoplanetary disks to ALMA continuum and spectral line datasets using Markov Chain Monte Carlo fitting. It contains two tools, one to fit ALMA continuum visibilities and broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs) with full radiative transfer models, and another to fit ALMA spectral line visibilities with protoplanetary disk models that include a vertically isothermal, power law temperature distribution. No radiative equilibrium calculation is done.

[ascl:1605.008] PDT: Photometric DeTrending Algorithm Using Machine Learning

PDT removes systematic trends in light curves. It finds clusters of light curves that are highly correlated using machine learning, constructs one master trend per cluster and detrends an individual light curve using the constructed master trends by minimizing residuals while constraining coefficients to be positive.

[ascl:2001.014] Peasoup: C++/CUDA GPU pulsar searching library

The NVIDIA GPU-based pipeline code peasoup provides a one-step pulsar search, including searching for pulsars with up to moderate accelerations, with only one command. Its features include dedispersion, dereddening in the Fourier domain, resampling, peak detection, and optional time series folding. peasoup's output is the candidate list.

[ascl:1304.001] PEC: Period Error Calculator

The PEC (Period Error Calculator) algorithm estimates the period error for eclipsing binaries observed by the Kepler Mission. The algorithm is based on propagation of error theory and assumes that observation of every light curve peak/minimum in a long time-series observation can be unambiguously identified. A simple C implementation of the PEC algorithm is available.

[ascl:1108.008] PÉGASE-HR: Stellar Population Synthesis at High Resolution Spectra

PÉGASE-HR is a code aimed at computing synthetic evolutive optical spectra of galaxies with a very high resolution (R=10 000, or dlambda=0.55) in the range Lambda=[4000, 6800] Angstroms. PÉGASE-HR is the result of combining the code PÉGASE.2 with the high-resolution stellar library ÉLODIE. This code can also be used at low resolution (R=200) over the range covered by the BaSeL library (from far UV to the near IR), and then produces the same results as PÉGASE.2. In PEGASE-HR, the BaSeL library is replaced by a grid of spectra interpolated from the high-resolution ÉLODIE library of stellar spectra. The ÉLODIE library is a stellar database of 1959 spectra for 1503 stars, observed with the echelle spectrograph ÉLODIE on the 193 cm telescope at the Observatoire de Haute Provence.

[ascl:1108.007] PÉGASE: Metallicity-consistent Spectral Evolution Model of Galaxies

PÉGASE (Projet d'Étude des GAlaxies par Synthèse Évolutive) is a code to compute the spectral evolution of galaxies. The evolution of the stars, gas and metals is followed for a law of star formation and a stellar initial mass function. The stellar evolutionary tracks extend from the main sequence to the white dwarf stage. The emission of the gas in HII regions is also taken into account. The main improvement in version 2 is the use of evolutionary tracks of different metallicities (from 10-4 to 5×solar). The effect of extinction by dust is also modelled using a radiative transfer code. PÉGASE.2 uses the BaSeL library of stellar spectra and can therefore synthesize low-resolution (R~200) ultraviolet to near-infrared spectra of Hubble sequence galaxies as well as of starbursts.

[ascl:1507.003] Pelican: Pipeline for Extensible, Lightweight Imaging and CAlibratioN

Pelican is an efficient, lightweight C++ library for quasi-real time data processing. The library provides a framework to separate the acquisition and processing of data, allowing the scalability and flexibility to fit a number of scenarios. Though its origin was in radio astronomy, processing data as it arrives from a telescope, the framework is sufficiently generic to be useful to any application that requires the efficient processing of incoming data streams.

[ascl:1010.060] Pencil: Finite-difference Code for Compressible Hydrodynamic Flows

The Pencil code is a high-order finite-difference code for compressible hydrodynamic flows with magnetic fields. It is highly modular and can easily be adapted to different types of problems. The code runs efficiently under MPI on massively parallel shared- or distributed-memory computers, like e.g. large Beowulf clusters. The Pencil code is primarily designed to deal with weakly compressible turbulent flows. To achieve good parallelization, explicit (as opposed to compact) finite differences are used. Typical scientific targets include driven MHD turbulence in a periodic box, convection in a slab with non-periodic upper and lower boundaries, a convective star embedded in a fully nonperiodic box, accretion disc turbulence in the shearing sheet approximation, self-gravity, non-local radiation transfer, dust particle evolution with feedback on the gas, etc. A range of artificial viscosity and diffusion schemes can be invoked to deal with supersonic flows. For direct simulations regular viscosity and diffusion is being used. The code is written in well-commented Fortran90.

[ascl:1811.019] PENTACLE: Large-scale particle simulations code for planet formation

PENTACLE calculates gravitational interactions between particles within a cut-off radius and a Barnes-Hut tree method for gravity from particles beyond. It uses FDPS (ascl:1604.011) to parallelize a Barnes-Hut tree algorithm for a memory-distributed supercomputer. The software can handle 1-10 million particles in a high-resolution N-body simulation on CPU clusters for collisional dynamics, including physical collisions in a planetesimal disc.

[ascl:2306.027] PEP: Planetary Ephemeris Program

Planetary Ephemeris Program (PEP) computes numerical ephemerides and simultaneously analyzes a heterogeneous collection of astrometric data. Written in Fortran, it is a general-purpose astrometric data-analysis program and models orbital motion in the solar system, determines orbital initial conditions and planetary masses, and has been used to, for example, measure general relativistic effects and test physics theories beyond the standard model. PEP also models pulsar motions and distant radio sources, and can solve for sky coordinates for radio sources, plasma densities, and the second harmonic of the Sun's gravitational field.

[ascl:2306.040] PEPITA: Prediction of Exoplanet Precisions using Information in Transit Analysis

PEPITA (Prediction of Exoplanet Precisions using Information in Transit Analysis) makes predictions for the precision of exoplanet parameters using transit light-curves. The code uses information analysis techniques to predict the best precision that can be obtained by fitting a light-curve without actually needing to perform the fit, thus allowing more efficient planning of observations or re-observations.

[ascl:2309.016] PEREGRINE: Gravitational wave parameter inference with neural ration estimation

PEREGRINE performs full parameter estimation on gravitational wave signals. Using an internal Truncated Marginal Neural Ratio Estimation (TMNRE) algorithm and building upon the swyft (ascl:2302.016) code to efficiently access marginal posteriors, PEREGRINE conducts a sequential simulation-based inference approach to support the analysis of both transient and continuous gravitational wave sources. The code can fully reconstruct the posterior distributions for all parameters of spinning, precessing compact binary mergers using waveform approximants.

[ascl:1809.005] perfectns: "Perfect" dynamic and standard nested sampling for spherically symmetric likelihoods and priors

perfectns performs dynamic nested sampling and standard nested sampling for spherically symmetric likelihoods and priors, and analyses the samples produced. The spherical symmetry allows the nested sampling algorithm to be followed “perfectly” - i.e. without implementation-specific errors correlations between samples. It is intended for use in research into the statistical properties of nested sampling, and to provide a benchmark for testing the performance of nested sampling software packages used for practical problems - which rely on numerical techniques to produce approximately uncorrelated samples.

[ascl:1406.005] PERIOD: Time-series analysis package

PERIOD searches for periodicities in data. It is distributed within the Starlink software collection (ascl:1110.012).

[ascl:1407.009] Period04: Statistical analysis of large astronomical time series

Period04 statistically analyzes large astronomical time series containing gaps. It calculates formal uncertainties, can extract the individual frequencies from the multiperiodic content of time series, and provides a flexible interface to perform multiple-frequency fits with a combination of least-squares fitting and the discrete Fourier transform algorithm. Period04, written in Java/C++, supports the SAMP communication protocol to provide interoperability with other applications of the Virtual Observatory. It is a reworked and extended version of Period98 (Sperl 1998) and PERIOD/PERDET (Breger 1990).

[ascl:2007.005] PeTar: ParticlE Tree & particle-particle & Algorithmic Regularization code for simulating massive star clusters

The N-body code PETAR (ParticlE Tree & particle-particle & Algorithmic Regularization) combines the methods of Barnes-Hut tree, Hermite integrator and slow-down algorithmic regularization (SDAR). It accurately handles an arbitrary fraction of multiple systems (e.g. binaries, triples) while keeping a high performance by using the hybrid parallelization methods with MPI, OpenMP, SIMD instructions and GPU. PETAR has very good agreement with NBODY6++GPU results on the long-term evolution of the global structure, binary orbits and escapers and is significantly faster when used on a highly configured GPU desktop computer. PETAR scales well when the number of cores increase on the Cray XC50 supercomputer, allowing a solution to the ten million-body problem which covers the region of ultra compact dwarfs and nuclear star clusters.

[ascl:2207.014] petitRADTRANS: Exoplanet spectra calculator

petitRADTRANS (pRT) calculates transmission and emission spectra of exoplanets for clear and cloudy planets. It also incorporates an easy subpackage for running retrievals with nested sampling. It allows the calculation of emission or transmission spectra, at low or high resolution, clear or cloudy, and includes a retrieval module to fit a petitRADTRANS model to spectral data. pRT has two different opacity treatment modes. The low resolution mode runs calculations at λ/Δλ ≤ 1000 using the so-called correlated-k treatment for opacities. The high resolution mode runs calculations at λ/Δλ ≤ 106, using a line-by-line opacity treatment.

[ascl:2203.013] PetroFit: Petrosian properties calculator and galaxy light profiles fitter

PetroFit calculates Petrosian properties, such as radii and concentration indices; it also fits galaxy light profiles. The package, built on Photutils (ascl:1609.011), includes tools for performing accurate photometry, segmentations, Petrosian properties, and fitting.

[ascl:2210.016] PETSc: Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation

PETSc (Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation) provides a suite of data structures and routines for the scalable (parallel) solution of scientific applications modeled by partial differential equations, and is intended for use in large-scale application projects. The toolkit includes a large suite of parallel linear, nonlinear equation solvers and ODE integrators that are easily used in application codes written in C, C++, Fortran and Python. PETSc provides many of the mechanisms needed within parallel application codes, such as simple parallel matrix and vector assembly routines that allow the overlap of communication and computation. In addition, PETSc (pronounced PET-see) includes support for managing parallel PDE discretizations.

[ascl:1910.010] PEXO: Precise EXOplanetology

PEXO provides a global modeling framework for ns timing, μas astrometry, and μm/s radial velocities. It can account for binary motion and stellar reflex motions induced by planetary companions and also treat various relativistic effects both in the Solar System and in the target system (Roemer, Shapiro, and Einstein delays). PEXO is able to model timing to a precision of 1 ns, astrometry to a precision of 1 μas, and radial velocity to a precision of 1 μm/s.

[ascl:1812.003] PFANT: Stellar spectral synthesis code

PFANT computes a synthetic spectrum assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium from a given stellar model atmosphere and lists of atomic and molecular lines; it provides large wavelength coverage and line lists from ultraviolet through the visible and near-infrared. PFANT has been optimized for speed, offers error reporting, and command-line configuration options.

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