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[ascl:2010.002] GSpec: Gamma-ray Burst Monitor analyzer

GSpec analyzes the Fermi mission's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) data via a user-interactive GUI. The software provides a seamless interface to XSPEC (ascl:9910.005). It allows users to create their own Python scripts using the included libraries, and to define additional data reduction techniques, such as background fitting/estimation and data binning, as Python-based plugins. It is part of a larger effort to produce a set of GBM data tools to allow the broader community to analyze all aspects of GBM data, including the continuous data that GBM produces. GSpec is similar to RMfit (ascl:1409.011), a GUI-based spectral analysis code that specializes in the analysis of GBM trigger data, and is intended to eventually replace that IDL package.

[ascl:2208.021] GSSP: Grid Search in Stellar Parameters

GSSP (Grid Search in Stellar Parameters) is based on a grid search in the fundamental atmospheric parameters and (optionally) individual chemical abundances of the star (or binary stellar components) in question. It uses atmosphere models and spectrum synthesis, which assumes a comparison of the observations with each theoretical spectrum from the grid. The code can optimize five stellar parameters at a time (effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, microturbulent velocity, and projected rotational velocity of the star) and synthetic spectra can be computed in any number of wavelength ranges. GSSP builds the grid of theoretical spectra from all possible combinations of the above mentioned parameters, and delivers the set of best fit parameters, the corresponding synthetic spectrum, and the ASCII file containing the individual parameter values for all grid points and the corresponding chi-square values.

[ascl:2208.020] GStokes: Magnetic field structure and line profiles calculator

GStokes performs simple multipolar fits to circular polarization data to provide information about the field strength and geometry. It provides forward calculation of the disc-integrated Stokes parameter profiles as well as magnetic inversions under several widely used simplifying approximations of the polarized line formation. GStokes implements the Unno–Rachkovsky analytical solution of the polarized radiative transfer equation and the weak-field approximation with the Gaussian local profiles. The magnetic field geometry is described with one of the common low-order multipolar field parametrizations. Written in IDL, GStokes provides a user-friendly graphical front-end.

[ascl:2307.034] Guacho: 3D uniform mesh parallel HD/MHD code for astrophysics

Guacho is a 3D hydrodynamical/magnetohydrodynamical code suited for astrophysical fluids. The hydrodynamic equations are evolved with a number of approximate Riemann solvers. Gaucho includes various modules to deal with different cooling regimes, and a radiation transfer module based on a Monte Carlo ray tracing method. The code can run sequentially or in parallel with MPI.

[ascl:2107.013] GUBAS: General Use Binary Asteroid Simulator

GUBAS (General Use Binary Asteroid Simulator) predicts binary asteroid system behaviors by implementing the Hou 2016 realization of the full two-body problem (F2BP). The F2BP models binary asteroid systems as two arbitrary mass distributions whose mass elements interact gravitationally and result in both gravity forces and torques. To account for these mass distributions and model the mutual gravity of the F2BP, GUBAS computes the inertia integrals of each body up to a user defined expansion order. This approach provides a recursive expression of the mutual gravity potential and represents a significant decrease in the computational burden of the F2BP when compared to other methods of representing the mutual potential.

[ascl:2305.016] gw_pta_emulator: Gravitational Waves via Pulsar Timing Arrays

The gw_pta_emulator reads in gravitational wave (GW) characteristic strain spectra from black-hole population simulations, re-bins for the user's observing baseline, and constructs new spectra. The user can train a Gaussian process to emulate the spectral behavior at all frequencies across the astrophysical parameter space of supermassive black-hole binary environments.

[ascl:2307.047] GWDALI: Gravitational wave parameter estimation

GWDALI focuses on parameter estimations of gravitational waves generated by compact object coalescence (CBC). This software employs both Gaussian (Fisher Matrix) and Beyond-Gaussian methods to approximate the likelihood of gravitational wave events. GWDALI also addresses the challenges posed by Fisher Matrices with zero determinants. Additionally, the Beyond-Gaussian approach incorporates the Derivative Approximation for Likelihoods (DALI) algorithm, enabling a more reliable estimation process.

[ascl:2207.032] gwdet: Detectability of gravitational-wave signals from compact binary coalescences

gwdet computes the probability of detecting a gravitational-wave signal from compact binaries averaging over sky-location and source inclination. The code has two classes, averageangles and detectability. averageangles computes the detection probability, averaged over all angles (such as sky location, polarization, and inclination), as a function of the projection parameter. detectability computes the detection probability of a non-spinning compact binary.

[ascl:2002.013] GWecc: Calculator for pulsar timing array signals due to eccentric supermassive binaries

GWecc computes the pulsar timing array (PTA) signals induced by eccentric supermassive binaries. Written in C++, it computes the plus/cross polarizations as well as Earth and pulsar terms of the PTA signal given the binary parameters and the sky locations of the binary and the pulsar. A python wrapper is included through which GWecc can be used to simulate, search for and constrain gravitational wave-emitting eccentric supermassive binaries using packages such as ENTERPRISE (ascl:1912.015) and libstempo (ascl:2002.017).

[ascl:2212.001] GWFAST: Fisher information matrix python package for gravitational-wave detectors

GWFAST forecasts the signal-to-noise ratios and parameter estimation capabilities of networks of gravitational-wave detectors, based on the Fisher information matrix approximation. It is designed for applications to third-generation gravitational-wave detectors. It is based on Automatic Differentiation, which makes use of the library JAX (ascl:2111.002). This allows efficient parallelization and numerical accuracy. The code includes a module for parallel computation on clusters.

[ascl:1701.011] GWFrames: Manipulate gravitational waveforms

GWFrames eliminates all rotational behavior, thus simplifying the waveform as much as possible and allowing direct generalizations of methods for analyzing nonprecessing systems. In the process, the angular velocity of a waveform is introduced, which also has important uses, such as supplying a partial solution to an important inverse problem.

This code is no longer maintained; much of its functionality has been moved to scri (ascl:2303.011) or to sxs.

[ascl:1912.016] GWpy: Python package for studying data from gravitational-wave detectors

The Python package GWpy analyzes and characterizes gravitational wave data. It provides a user-friendly, intuitive interface to the common time-domain and frequency-domain data produced by the LIGO and Virgo observatories and their analyses. The core Python infrastructure is influenced by, and extends the functionality of, the Astropy (ascl:1304.002) package, and its methodology has been derived from, and augmented by, the LIGO Algorithm Library Suite (LALSuite), a large collection of primarily C99 routines for analysis and manipulation of data from gravitational-wave detectors. These packages use the SWIG program to produce Python wrappings for all C modules, allowing the GWpy package to leverage both the completeness, and the speed, of these libraries.

[ascl:2309.004] GWSim: Mock gravitational waves event generator

GWSim generates mock gravitational waves (GW) events corresponding to different binary black holes (BBHs) population models. It can incorporate scenarios of GW mass models, GW spin distributions, the merger rate, and the cosmological parameters. GWSim generates samples of binary compact objects for a fixed amount of observation time, duty cycle, and configurations of the detector network; the universe created by the code is uniform in comobile volume.

[ascl:2305.018] GWSurrogate: Gravitational wave surrogate models

GWSurrogate provides an easy to use interface to gravitational wave surrogate models. Surrogates provide a fast and accurate evaluation mechanism for gravitational waveforms which would otherwise be found through solving differential equations. These equations must be solved in the “building” phase, which was performed using other codes.

[ascl:2111.018] GWToolbox: Gravitational wave observation simulator

GWToolbox simulates gravitational wave observations for various detectors. The package is composed of three modules, namely the ground-based detectors (and their targets), the space-borne detectors (and their targets) and pulsar timing arrays (PTA). These three modules work independently and have different dependencies on other packages and libraries; failed dependencies met in one module will not influence the usage of another module. GWToolbox can accessed with a web interface (gw-universe.org) or as a python package (https://bitbucket.org/radboudradiolab/gwtoolbox).

[ascl:1203.005] Gyoto: General relativitY Orbit Tracer of Observatoire de Paris

GYOTO, a general relativistic ray-tracing code, aims at computing images of astronomical bodies in the vicinity of compact objects, as well as trajectories of massive bodies in relativistic environments. This code is capable of integrating the null and timelike geodesic equations not only in the Kerr metric, but also in any metric computed numerically within the 3+1 formalism of general relativity. Simulated images and spectra have been computed for a variety of astronomical targets, such as a moving star or a toroidal accretion structure. The underlying code is open source and freely available. It is user-friendly, quickly handled and very modular so that extensions are easy to integrate. Custom analytical metrics and astronomical targets can be implemented in C++ plug-in extensions independent from the main code.

[ascl:1308.010] GYRE: Stellar oscillation code

GYRE is an oscillation code that solves the stellar pulsation equations (both adiabatic and non-adiabatic) using a novel Magnus Multiple Shooting numerical scheme devised to overcome certain weaknesses of the usual relaxation and shooting schemes. The code is accurate (up to 6th order in the number of grid points), robust, and makes efficient use of multiple processor cores and/or nodes.

[ascl:1402.031] gyrfalcON: N-body code

gyrfalcON (GalaxY simulatoR using falcON) is a full-fledged N-body code using Dehnen’s force algorithm of complexity O(N) (falcON); this algorithm is approximately 10 times faster than an optimally coded tree code. The code features individual adaptive time steps and individual (but fixed) softening lengths. gyrfalcON is included in and requires NEMO (ascl:1010.051) to run.

[ascl:2307.026] gyrointerp: Gyrochronology via interpolation of open cluster rotation sequences

gyrointerp calculates gyrochronal ages by interpolating between open cluster rotation sequences. The framework, written in Python, can be used to find the gyrochronological age posterior of single or many stars. It can also produce a visual interpolation for a star’s age to determine where the star falls in the rotation-temperature plane in comparison to known reference clusters. gyrointerp models the ensemble evolution of rotation periods for main-sequence stars with temperatures of 3800-6200 K (masses of 0.5-1.2 solar) and is not applicable for subgiant or giant stars, and should be used cautiously with binary stars, as they can observationally bias temperature and rotation period measurements.

[ascl:2211.015] H-FISTA: Phase retrieval for pulsar spectroscopy

H-FISTA (Hierarchical Fast Iterative Shrinkage Thresholding Algorithm) retrieves the phases of the wavefield from intensity measurements for pulsar spectroscopy. The code accepts input data in ASCII format as produced by PSRchive's (ascl:1105.014) psrflux function, a FITS file, or a pickle. If using a notebook, any custom reader can be used as long as the data ends up in a NumPy array. H-FISTA obtains sparse models of the wavefield in a hierarchical approach with progressively increasing depth. Once the tail of the noise distribution is reached, the hierarchy terminates with a final unregularized optimization, resulting in a fully dense model of the complex wavefield that permits the discovery of faint signals by appropriate averaging.

[ascl:1909.005] HADES: Hexadecapolar Analysis for Dust Estimation in Simulations (of CMB B-mode thermal dust emission)

HADES analyzse dust levels in simulated CMB galactic dust maps with realistic experimental noise and lensing configurations. It allows detection of dust via its anisotropy properties in CMB B-modes. It also includes techniques for computing null-tests and a rudimentary technique for dedusting.

[ascl:2306.001] HAFFET: Supernovae photometric and spectroscopic data analyzer

HAFFET (Hybrid Analytic Flux FittEr for Transients) analyzes supernovae photometric and spectroscopic data. It handles observational data for a set of targets, estimates their physical parameters, and visualizes the population of inferred parameters. HAFFET defines two classes, snobject for data and fittings for one specific object, and snelist to organize the overall running for a list of objects. The HAFFET package includes utilities for downloading SN data from online sources, intepolating multi band lightcurves, characterizing the first light and rising of SNe with power law fits, and matching epochs of different bands. It can also calculate colors, and/or construct the spectral energy distribution (SED), estimate bolometric LCs and host galaxy extinction, fit the constructed bolometric lightcurves to different models, and identify and fit the absorption minima of spectral lines, in addition to performing other tasks. In addition to utilizing the built-in models, users can add their own models or import models from other python packages.

[ascl:2002.014] HaloAnalysis: Read and analyze halo catalogs and merger trees

HaloAnalysis reads and analyzes halo/galaxy catalogs, generated from Rockstar (ascl:1210.008) or AHF (ascl:1102.009), and merger trees generated from Consistent Trees (ascl:1210.011). Written in Python, it offers the following functionalities: reads halo/galaxy/tree catalogs from multiple file formats; assigns baryonic particles and galaxy properties to dark-matter halos; combines and re-generates halo/galaxy/tree files in hdf5 format; analyzes properties of halos/galaxies; and selects halos to generate zoom-in initial conditions. The code includes a tutorial in the form of a Jupyter notebook.

[ascl:1402.032] HALOFIT: Nonlinear distribution of cosmological mass and galaxies

HALOFIT provides an explanatory framework for galaxy bias and clustering and has been incorporated into CMB packages such as CMBFAST (ascl:9909.004) and CAMB (ascl:1102.026). It attains a reasonable level of precision, though the halo model does not match N-body data perfectly. The code is written in Fortran 77. HALOFIT tends to underpredict the power on the smallest scales in standard LCDM universes (although HALOFIT was designed to work for a much wider range of power spectra); its accuracy can be improved by using a supplied correction.

[ascl:1010.053] Halofitting codes for DGP and Degravitation

We perform N-body simulations of theories with infinite-volume extra dimensions, such as the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati (DGP) model and its higher-dimensional generalizations, where 4D gravity is mediated by massive gravitons. The longitudinal mode of these gravitons mediates an extra scalar force, which we model as a density-dependent modification to the Poisson equation. This enhances gravitational clustering, particularly on scales that have undergone mild nonlinear processing. While the standard non-linear fitting algorithm of Smith et al. overestimates this power enhancement on non-linear scales, we present a modified fitting formula that offers a remarkably good fit to our power spectra. Due to the uncertainty in galaxy bias, our results are consistent with precision power spectrum determinations from galaxy redshift surveys, even for graviton Compton wavelengths as small as 300 Mpc. Our model is sufficiently general that we expect it to capture the phenomenology of a wide class of related higher-dimensional gravity scenarios.

[ascl:1505.017] HALOGEN: Approximate synthetic halo catalog generator

HALOGEN generates approximate synthetic halo catalogs. Written in C, it decomposes the problem of generating cosmological tracer distributions (eg. halos) into four steps: generating an approximate density field, generating the required number of tracers from a CDF over mass, placing the tracers on field particles according to a bias scheme dependent on local density, and assigning velocities to the tracers based on velocities of local particles. It also implements a default set of four models for these steps. HALOGEN uses 2LPTic (ascl:1201.005) and CUTE (ascl:1505.016); the software is flexible and can be adapted to varying cosmologies and simulation specifications.

[ascl:2011.009] HaloGen: Modular halo model code

HaloGen computes all auto and cross spectra and halo model trispectrum in simple configurations. This modular halo model code computes 3d power spectra, and the corresponding projected 2d power spectra in the Limber and flat sky approximations. The observables include matter density, galaxy lensing, CMB lensing, thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich, cosmic infrared background, tracers with any dn/dz, b(z) and HOD.

[ascl:1407.020] Halogen: Multimass spherical structure models for N-body simulations

Halogen, written in C, generates multimass spherically symmetric initial conditions for N-body simulations. A large family of radial density profiles is supported. The initial conditions are sampled from the full distribution function.

[ascl:2303.020] HaloGraphNet: Predict halo masses from simulations

HaloGraphNet predicts halo masses from simulations using Graph Neural Networks. Given a dark matter halo and its galaxies, this software creates a graph with information about the 3D position, stellar mass and other properties. It then trains a Graph Neural Network to predict the mass of the host halo. Data are taken from the CAMELS hydrodynamic simulations.

[ascl:2009.016] halomod: Flexible interface for the halo model of dark matter halos

halomod calculates cosmological halo model and HOD quantities. It is built on HMF (ascl:1412.006); it retains that code's features and provides extended components for the halo model, including numerous halo bias models, including scale-dependent bias, basic concentration-mass-redshift relations, and several plug-and-play halo-exclusion models. halomod includes built-in HOD parameterizations and halo profiles, support for WDM models, and all basic quantities such as 3D correlations and power spectra, and also several derived quantities such as effective bias and satellite fraction. In addition, it offers a simple routine for populating a halo catalog with galaxies via a HOD. halomod is flexible and modular, making it easily extendable.

[ascl:1604.005] Halotools: Galaxy-Halo connection models

Halotools builds and tests models of the galaxy-halo connection and analyzes catalogs of dark matter halos. The core functions of the package include fast generation of synthetic galaxy populations using HODs, abundance matching, and related methods; efficient algorithms for calculating galaxy clustering, lensing, z-space distortions, and other astronomical statistics; a modular, object-oriented framework for designing galaxy evolution models; and end-to-end support for reducing halo catalogs and caching them as hdf5 files.

[ascl:1210.022] HAM2D: 2D Shearing Box Model

HAM solves non-relativistic hyperbolic partial differential equations in conservative form using high-resolution shock-capturing techniques. This version of HAM has been configured to solve the magnetohydrodynamic equations of motion in axisymmetry to evolve a shearing box model.

[ascl:1201.014] Hammurabi: Simulating polarized Galactic synchrotron emission

The Hammurabi code is a publicly available C++ code for generating mock polarized observations of Galactic synchrotron emission with telescopes such as LOFAR, SKA, Planck, and WMAP, based on model inputs for the Galactic magnetic field (GMF), the cosmic-ray density distribution, and the thermal electron density. The Hammurabi code allows one to perform simulations of several different data sets simultaneously, providing a more reliable constraint of the magnetized ISM.

[ascl:2112.022] hankl: Python implementation of the FFTLog algorithm for cosmology

hankl implements the FFTLog algorithm in lightweight Python code. The FFTLog algorithm can be thought of as the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of a logarithmically spaced periodic sequence (= Hankel Transform). hankl consists of two modules, the General FFTLog module and the Cosmology one. The latter is suited for modern cosmological application and relies heavily on the former to perform the Hankel transforms. The accuracy of the method usually improves as the range of integration is enlarged; FFTlog prefers an interval that spans many orders of magnitude. Resolution is important, as low resolution introduces sharp features which in turn causes ringing.

[ascl:1905.009] HAOS-DIPER: HAO Spectral Diagnostic Package For Emitted Radiation

HAOS-DIPER works with and manipulates data for neutral atoms and atomic ions to understand radiation emitted by some space plasmas, notably the solar atmosphere and stellar atmospheres. HAOS-DIPER works with quantum numbers for atomic levels, enabling it to perform tasks otherwise difficult or very tedious, including a variety of data checks, calculations based upon the atomic numbers, and searching and manipulating data based upon these quantum numbers. HAOS-DIPER handles conditions from LTE to coronal-like conditions, in a manner controlled by one system variable !REGIME, and has some capability for estimating data for which no accurate parameters are available and for accounting for the effects of missing atomic levels.

[ascl:2102.010] hardCORE: Exoplanet core radius fractions calculator

hardCORE calculates the minimum, maximum, and marginal core radius fractions (CRFmin, CRFmax, CRFmarg) for a solid exoplanet using only its mass and radius. Written in Python, the code is an efficient tool that is extremely fast to execute and perform inversions.

[ascl:1209.005] HARM: A Numerical Scheme for General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics

HARM uses a conservative, shock-capturing scheme for evolving the equations of general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics. The fluxes are calculated using the Harten, Lax, & van Leer scheme. A variant of constrained transport, proposed earlier by Tóth, is used to maintain a divergence-free magnetic field. Only the covariant form of the metric in a coordinate basis is required to specify the geometry. On smooth flows HARM converges at second order.

[ascl:2009.022] Harmonia: Hybrid-basis inference for large-scale galaxy clustering

Harmonia combines clustering statistics decomposed in spherical and Cartesian Fourier bases for large-scale galaxy clustering likelihood analysis. Optimal weighting schemes for spherical Fourier analysis can also be readily implemented using the code.

[ascl:2401.009] Harmonic: Learnt harmonic mean estimator

harmonic learns an approximate harmonic mean estimator (referred to as a "learnt harmonic mean estimator") from posterior distribution samples to compute the marginal likelihood required for Bayesian model selection. Using a large number of independent Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) chains from another package such as emcee (ascl:1303.002), harmonic uses importance sampling to learn a new target distribution in order to optimize an approximate harmonic estimator while minimizing its variance.

[ascl:1306.003] Harmony: Synchrotron Emission Coefficients

Harmony is a general numerical scheme for evaluating MBS emission and absorption coefficients for both polarized and unpolarized light in a plasma with a general distribution function.

[ascl:1912.014] HARMPI: 3D massively parallel general relativictic MHD code

HARMPI is a parallel, 3D version of HARM (ascl:1209.005), which solves hyperbolic partial differential equations in conservative form using high-resolution shock-capturing techniques. The code is parallelized using MPI and is fully operational in 3D. HARMPI, like HARM, is capable of using non-uniform grids and solves the relativistic magnetohydrodynamic equations of motion on a stationary black hole spacetime in Kerr-Schild coordinates to evolve an accretion disk model.

[ascl:2302.008] HawkingNet: Finding Hawking points in the Cosmic Microwave Background

HawkingNet searches for Hawking points in large Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data sets. It is based on the deep residual network ResNet18 and consists of eighteen neural layers. Written in Paython, HawkingNet inputs the CMB data, processes the data through its internal network trained for data classification, and outputs the result in a form of a classification score that indicates how confident it is that a Hawking point is contained in the image patch.

[ascl:2307.046] HAYASHI: Halo-level AnalYsis of the Absorption Signal in HI

HAYASHI (Halo-level AnalYsis of the Absorption Signal in HI) computes the number of absorption features of the 21cm forest using a semianalytic formalism. It includes the enhancement of the signal due to the presence of substructures within minihalos and supports non-standard cosmologies with impact in the large scale structure, such as warm dark matter and primordial black holes. HAYASHI is written in Python3 and uses the cosmological computations package Colossus (ascl:1501.016).

[ascl:1109.004] HAZEL: HAnle and ZEeman Light

A big challenge in solar and stellar physics in the coming years will be to decipher the magnetism of the solar outer atmosphere (chromosphere and corona) along with its dynamic coupling with the magnetic fields of the underlying photosphere. To this end, it is important to develop rigorous diagnostic tools for the physical interpretation of spectropolarimetric observations in suitably chosen spectral lines. HAZEL is a computer program for the synthesis and inversion of Stokes profiles caused by the joint action of atomic level polarization and the Hanle and Zeeman effects in some spectral lines of diagnostic interest, such as those of the He I 1083.0 nm and 587.6 nm (or D3) multiplets. It is based on the quantum theory of spectral line polarization, which takes into account in a rigorous way all the relevant physical mechanisms and ingredients (optical pumping, atomic level polarization, level crossings and repulsions, Zeeman, Paschen-Back and Hanle effects). The influence of radiative transfer on the emergent spectral line radiation is taken into account through a suitable slab model. The user can either calculate the emergent intensity and polarization for any given magnetic field vector or infer the dynamical and magnetic properties from the observed Stokes profiles via an efficient inversion algorithm based on global optimization methods.

[ascl:2212.009] Hazma: Compute indirect detection constraints on sub-GeV dark matter

Hazma enables indirect detection of sub-GeV dark matter. It computes gamma-ray and electron/positron spectra from dark matter annihilations, sets limits on sub-GeV dark matter using existing gamma-ray data, and determines the discovery reach of future gamma-ray detectors. The code also derives accurate CMB constraints. Hazma comes with several sub-GeV dark matter models, for which it provides functions to compute dark matter annihilation cross sections and mediator decay widths. A variety of low-level tools are provided to make it straightforward to define new models.

[ascl:1711.022] HBT: Hierarchical Bound-Tracing

HBT is a Hierarchical Bound-Tracing subhalo finder and merger tree builder, for numerical simulations in cosmology. It tracks haloes from birth and continues to track them after mergers, finding self-bound structures as subhaloes and recording their merger histories as merger trees.

[ascl:1711.023] HBT+: Subhalo finder and merger tree builder

HBT+ is a hybrid subhalo finder and merger tree builder for cosmological simulations. It comes as an MPI edition that can be run on distributed clusters or shared memory machines and is MPI/OpenMP parallelized, and also as an OpenMP edition that can be run on shared memory machines and is only OpenMP parallelized. This version is more memory efficient than the MPI branch on shared memory machines, and is more suitable for analyzing zoomed-in simulations that are difficult to balance on distributed clusters. Both editions support hydro simulations with gas/stars.

[ascl:2012.023] HCGrid: Mapping non-uniform radio astronomy data onto a uniformly distributed grid

HCGrid maps non-uniform radio astronomy data onto a uniformly distributed grid using a convolution-based algorithm on CPU-GPU heterogeneous platforms. The package has three modules; the initialization module initializes parameters needed for the calculation process, such as setting the size of the sampling space and output resolution. The gridding module uses a parallel ordering algorithm to pre-order the sampling points based on HEALPix on the CPU platform and uses an efficient two-level lookup table to speed up the acquisition of sampling points; it then accelerates convolution by using the high parallelism of GPU and through related performance optimization strategies based on CUDA architecture to further improve the gridding performance. The third module processes the results; it visualizes the gridding and exports the final products as FITS files.

[ascl:2302.026] HDMSpectra: Dark Matter Spectra from the electroweak to the Planck scale

HDMSpectra computes the decay spectrum for dark matter with masses above the scale of electroweak symmetry breaking, down to Planck scale and including all relevant electroweak interactions. The code determines the distribution of stable states for photons, neutrinos, positrons, and antiprotons.

[ascl:1502.009] HDS: Hierarchical Data System

The Hierarchical Data System (HDS) is a file-based hierarchical data system designed for the storage of a wide variety of information. It is particularly suited to the storage of large multi-dimensional arrays (with their ancillary data) where efficient access is needed. It is a key component of the Starlink software collection (ascl:1110.012) and is used by the Starlink N-Dimensional Data Format (NDF) library (ascl:1411.023).

HDS organizes data into hierarchies, broadly similar to the directory structure of a hierarchical filing system, but contained within a single HDS container file. The structures stored in these files are self-describing and flexible; HDS supports modification and extension of structures previously created, as well as functions such as deletion, copying, and renaming. All information stored in HDS files is portable between the machines on which HDS is implemented. Thus, there are no format conversion problems when moving between machines. HDS can write files in a private binary format (version 4), or be layered on top of HDF5 (version 5).

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